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Fish and chips - a question for Brits mostly, but all welcome to contribute

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Feb 17, 2020 - 5:53:18 AM
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Hawgfiddle65

Scotland

1196 posts since 9/15/2010

Hi

Late in the queue

Batter most definitely on , salt and malt vinegar, mushy peas, In Scotland ,mainly its haddock but cod is lovely too. Plaice ,lemon sole are great too .Not too keen on rock salmon / rig (dogfish!)

There is a chippie in Pitlochry that does smoked haddock suppers, absolutely divine ,washed down with ginger beer

Deep fried mars bar to follow ? ! Yuk

Jim

Feb 17, 2020 - 7:07:41 AM

bubbalouie

Canada

13424 posts since 9/27/2007
Online Now

I recently read an article that the spiny dogfish were being caught & shipped overseas for the fish & chips market.

That would make our local salmon fishers really happy. Next to mackerel it's their most hated fish.

Dogfish travel in packs (hence the name) & when they get into a school that's all they catch. They excrete urine through their skin & most have the hook ripped out & thrown back to die later.

I guess they hate mackerel because it's not a salmon. I've asked some guys to bring me some because I've eaten them on the east coast & they are great rubbed with salt & cooked over coals. It hasn't happened yet!

Feb 17, 2020 - 7:23:29 AM
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m06

England

8414 posts since 10/5/2006

quote:
Originally posted by bubbalouie

Image result for size of great britain compared to british columbia

I find it funny how you guys in Great Britain look at each other so differently when the borders are so close together! You've been been feuding for thousands of years in that part of the world.

This is our Province of B.C. overlaid on the map. That's only one of them. Maybe you need some elbow room. smiley

 


The identity thing here is like a Russian doll. The deeper you look the smaller, but no less importantly felt, are the distinctions.

National cultural identity - English, Welsh, Scottish and Irish - is actually macro level or the big shape. 

Within England a big cultural distinction is made between northerner and a southerner by birth. As a southerner by birth and residence, I can tell you that there are also strong regional identities; I feel a strong identification with my Somerset roots. That is quite distinct from, for example a Cornish identity. Both southern English counties but with their own landscape, associations and cultural and historical references.

What outsiders often don’t realise is that within our tiny land island regional difference is noticeable over very short distances. Buildings display this regionality very clearly and accurately. The stone and orange terracotta roof tiles of traditional North Somerset houses, alter to Bath stone if you travel 20 miles north-east, become inset flint if you travel 25 miles due east into Wiltshire and onto the chalk upland of Salisbury Plain, and cobb and thatch if you travel 50 miles south toward the undulating hills and valleys of Dorset. Cornwall has it’s characteristic slate roofing material.

That micro level regionality is relevant to the food theme of this topic. Many of our traditional food items have strong regional origins. It’s no coincidence that we refer to a Cornish pasty. That’s the region with a strong association to that food item. Cider is associated with Somerset where I come from as it is a county of apple orchards where most farms used to have a press and agricultural workers liked to work at farms that made the best cider. Many farms here still sell their own scrumpy. Regional food is a long and intensely characterful list here.

Edited by - m06 on 02/17/2020 07:32:50

Feb 17, 2020 - 7:34:50 AM

71277 posts since 5/9/2007

One of these days I want to try deep-fried dogfish.

Feb 17, 2020 - 8:43:51 AM

2470 posts since 4/29/2012

quote:
Originally posted by steve davis

One of these days I want to try deep-fried dogfish.


Trust me. You don't.

Feb 17, 2020 - 8:55:32 AM

bubbalouie

Canada

13424 posts since 9/27/2007
Online Now

Here's a question for you Brits. Why don't the sheep just climb over those picturesque stone fences? 

They're in the goat family right? 

Feb 17, 2020 - 8:59:49 AM
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2470 posts since 4/29/2012

quote:
Originally posted by bubbalouie

Here's a question for you Brits. Why don't the sheep just climb over those picturesque stone fences? 

They're in the goat family right? 


They're sent to special sheep school for training before they let them out into the field. Actually they are different. Goats are browsers sheep are grazers. I'd say they evolved differently but some idiot would then get the thread locked 

Feb 17, 2020 - 9:11:27 AM
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conic

England

717 posts since 2/15/2014

quote:
Originally posted by m06
quote:
Originally posted by bubbalouie

Image result for size of great britain compared to british columbia

I find it funny how you guys in Great Britain look at each other so differently when the borders are so close together! You've been been feuding for thousands of years in that part of the world.

This is our Province of B.C. overlaid on the map. That's only one of them. Maybe you need some elbow room. smiley

 


The identity thing here is like a Russian doll. The deeper you look the smaller, but no less importantly felt, are the distinctions.

National cultural identity - English, Welsh, Scottish and Irish - is actually macro level or the big shape. 

Within England a big cultural distinction is made between northerner and a southerner by birth. As a southerner by birth and residence, I can tell you that there are also strong regional identities; I feel a strong identification with my Somerset roots. That is quite distinct from, for example a Cornish identity. Both southern English counties but with their own landscape, associations and cultural and historical references.

What outsiders often don’t realise is that within our tiny land island regional difference is noticeable over very short distances. Buildings display this regionality very clearly and accurately. The stone and orange terracotta roof tiles of traditional North Somerset houses, alter to Bath stone if you travel 20 miles north-east, become inset flint if you travel 25 miles due east into Wiltshire and onto the chalk upland of Salisbury Plain, and cobb and thatch if you travel 50 miles south toward the undulating hills and valleys of Dorset. Cornwall has it’s characteristic slate roofing material.

That micro level regionality is relevant to the food theme of this topic. Many of our traditional food items have strong regional origins. It’s no coincidence that we refer to a Cornish pasty. That’s the region with a strong association to that food item. Cider is associated with Somerset where I come from as it is a county of apple orchards where most farms used to have a press and agricultural workers liked to work at farms that made the best cider. Many farms here still sell their own scrumpy. Regional food is a long and intensely characterful list here.


Mike talks sense here but forgot to mention a building with no roof at all called stonehenge. 

I had some great food once in Bristol at the grillstock smoked meat outdoor cooking festival. I was a journalist photographer then and got to eat some of the competition food for a blog. 

Feb 17, 2020 - 9:19:17 AM
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Players Union Member

Brian T

Canada

16283 posts since 6/5/2008

Back in the day, my favorite from the Australian Fish & Chip shops was DF "Flake."
That's a $2 word for "Gummy Shark."
There was a really good family shop not 1/2 block around from my flat in Melbourne.
He had 2 little tables and 4 chairs. Good enough for me.
Part of the attraction for me was the crunchy batter coating. Eat all of it.

On the Gold Coast there was a shrimpy/crawfishy thing, a "mud-bug?"
I could eat those all day long with yam fries.

Feb 17, 2020 - 9:33:10 AM
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1264 posts since 4/22/2018

quote:
Originally posted by bubbalouie

Here's a question for you Brits. Why don't the sheep just climb over those picturesque stone fences? 

They're in the goat family right? 


It's simple Bob, basically its because they are too stupid.

Feb 17, 2020 - 10:38:38 AM
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m06

England

8414 posts since 10/5/2006

quote:
Originally posted by bubbalouie

 

>those picturesque stone fences<

 


...that we call drystone walls.

They are a particularly characteristic feature of Mendip in North Somerset. And are all over the place on farmland round here. There is a traditional skill to building and maintaining these drystone walls

Edited by - m06 on 02/17/2020 10:40:20

Feb 17, 2020 - 10:47:30 AM
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1483 posts since 2/12/2009

here in Kent the sheep have demolished all of our drystone walls, one morning in early 1936 all of the local farmers awoke to the realisation that Kent sheep are skilled masons and, expert in the use of tools ! since then they have had total freedom to roam the land, they are called "Freemasons"

Feb 17, 2020 - 7:14:15 PM
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bubbalouie

Canada

13424 posts since 9/27/2007
Online Now

I'm from the limestone city. Kingston Ontario. Many skilled stonemasons from the British isles immigrated there to build the Rideau Canal, https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/building-the-rideau-canal-feature

https://www.thewhig.com/news/local-news/the-walls-just-feel-so-much-a-part-of-what-the-island-is

There's some beautiful churches & municipal buildings & quaint stone farmhouses too.

Old Fort Henry & the Murney/Martello towers & Canada's oldest prison made of limestone there on Portsmouth Harbour.  

Feb 18, 2020 - 12:04:06 AM
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1264 posts since 4/22/2018

quote:
Originally posted by bubbalouie

I'm from the limestone city. Kingston Ontario. Many skilled stonemasons from the British isles immigrated there to build the Rideau Canal, https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/building-the-rideau-canal-feature

https://www.thewhig.com/news/local-news/the-walls-just-feel-so-much-a-part-of-what-the-island-is

There's some beautiful churches & municipal buildings & quaint stone farmhouses too.

Old Fort Henry & the Murney/Martello towers & Canada's oldest prison made of limestone there on Portsmouth Harbour.  


Bob, looking at your article in the Whig, last picture if a wa;l, the one with the guy holding the sheep is most typical of the dry stone walls you  find over here.  I have a dry stone wall all the way around my garden & house and went on a course to learn how to build and maintain them.  I'll never be an expert but in was a real insight into how much skill and effort goes into maintaining them.  We don't have the skilled mason sheep destroying walls that Nick mentioned that they have in Kent.  In my patch, it's hikers looking for shortcuts climbing over them - saving themselves a few hundred metres walk to a gate frequently costs local,farmers 2-3 days hard work putting them back together.  
 

I often look at some of the really long walls here that head up some really steep terrain and wonder how the local farm hand must've felt when he got his instructions and it sank in he was going to spend the next year solely collecting stone and building the wall,in all weathers (mainly rain here).

Feb 18, 2020 - 12:19:11 AM
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m06

England

8414 posts since 10/5/2006

Like most all things source matters.

Of course it's possible to buy a generic, mass-produced 'pasty' here. 'Pastiche' would be a more appropriate name. Flaky, greasy, sunken, flavourless, filled with some disgusting processed goop that is passed off as edible. But more fool the folks who buy that travesty of a food item. Because it bears no relation whatsoever to the real thing, made from wholesome ingredients and baked with love.

Really good local food and love are synonymous. And no nation has a monopoly on - or absence - of love.

The joke is on those folks who fail to understand this and instead, for whatever reason, throw lazy and ignorant 'stereotypes'.

Feb 18, 2020 - 12:29:57 AM

m06

England

8414 posts since 10/5/2006

Another traditional natural food here comes from the ocean that surrounds us.

Sure, the fishing industry here has shrunk to a fraction of what it was. But our harbours in small fishing ports (from Cornwall to Scotland) when boat crews are unloading their catch are still a cornucopia of wonderful seafood.

Freshly caught crab, lobster, mackerel, herring, plaice, sole, sea trout, and an array of shellfish including my favourite - fresh mussels.

Edited by - m06 on 02/18/2020 00:30:53

Feb 18, 2020 - 4:34:39 AM

mander

USA

4214 posts since 10/7/2007

quote:
Originally posted by m06
quote:
Originally posted by mander

That depends on where you live. If you live in any of the British Commonwealths, I would say, go ahead and eat both! If you live in Britain proper, and aren't part of the royal family, I suggest moving.The worst food on the planet is in Britain.


That is such a tired and uninformed cliche.

It depends entirely on the source. And that depends on the person’s local knowledge and access. Traditional British food items such as those mentioned previously and sourced from farm shops or small home-baker stalls or home-cooked are wonderful.

Your silly comment is like me characterising the American diet as the franchised garbage served up on the neon -signed strip into every US  town. An insipid McDonald pap-burger is not representative at all of the burgers my American friends have grilled for me themselves. A comparison and difference that an American above any nationality on the planet is daily culturally exposed to. And a person  who lives in a franchised glasshouse really shouldn’t throw stones. 

 


lol!

Sadly, McD's is representative. You posed the question. 

Feb 18, 2020 - 4:50:43 AM

mander

USA

4214 posts since 10/7/2007

quote:
Originally posted by AndrewD
quote:
Originally posted by mander

That depends on where you live. If you live in any of the British Commonwealths, I would say, go ahead and eat both! If you live in Britain proper, and aren't part of the royal family, I suggest moving.The worst food on the planet is in Britain.


I'm guessing that I've eaten more often in the US than you have in the UK. So when I say  that it's easier to get a good meal here than there i'm basing that on fact not received opinion.


Yes, that is very true. I only spent a mere three months in England. An experience I never want to repeat again. Not one decent meal the entire time, even when I shopped in the grocery stores and cooked at home, and I like my cooking. One would have thought the UK was at war and supplies scare.  Scotland had slightly better food. Ireland was better, too. I spent seven months in New Zealand. The best food on the planet. With the exception of a beet sandwich I ate out of politeness, everything I ate was delightful. A couple of weeks in Canada leaves me to believe the food is good there. 

Feb 18, 2020 - 4:56:50 AM

mander

USA

4214 posts since 10/7/2007

quote:
Originally posted by Wet Spaniel
quote:
Originally posted by mander

That depends on where you live. If you live in any of the British Commonwealths, I would say, go ahead and eat both! If you live in Britain proper, and aren't part of the royal family, I suggest moving.The worst food on the planet is in Britain.


Wow, I didn't have you down as either narrow minded or prone to sweeping generalisations.

every day is a school day I suppose!


Not my mind, it's my taste buds! :-)

Feb 18, 2020 - 5:54:33 AM

tmercks

USA

762 posts since 3/7/2006

I worked at a local chain restaurant (not a pirate's name) making seafood dishes for dine-in and the drive-thru. I always liked the product, and still eat it today, with a splash of vinegar and a good tartar sauce. I use the cocktail sauce on my fries too, instead of just ketchup. All that said, in the 3-4 years I worked there we only had one incident of no-batter eating. Once in a while when the prices were right, the company bought large amounts of fish - north atlantic cod. They would have an all-you-can-eat sale. Of course, you know how this works. The dining room server bringing around all the fries, hush puppies and slaw you could ever not want. And fish when anyone wanted more. But they wanted you to fill up on the side items first. I never saw anyone until two guys came in together and had a plan for beating the system. They removed the batter and ate the fish by itself. They were the only two I ever saw do this. They also passed on all the side items. No one else ever did this, so to see it suggested in this forum is quite unique for me. Oh, there was a large pile of leftover batter, for sure.

Feb 18, 2020 - 6:53:42 AM

71277 posts since 5/9/2007

Many of our quarrymen came here from Yorkshire in the early 1900s.
They brought with them a change in the Maine accent and what we now eat.

Feb 18, 2020 - 10:22:03 AM

1264 posts since 4/22/2018

quote:
Originally posted by steve davis

Many of our quarrymen came here from Yorkshire in the early 1900s.
They brought with them a change in the Maine accent and what we now eat.


I can only apologise about the slop you must have to eat now due to it's English origins Steve.

Feb 18, 2020 - 10:40:06 AM
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1483 posts since 2/12/2009

I was taught many years ago by a very elderly Yorkshire lady how to make real Yorkshire pudding also, a little trick, to stir a little of the pudding mix into the homemade gravy to give it a glaze, I reckon I make the best "Yorkies" hereabouts, and the best gravy !

Feb 18, 2020 - 10:47:12 AM

1264 posts since 4/22/2018

quote:
Originally posted by spoonfed

I was taught many years ago by a very elderly Yorkshire lady how to make real Yorkshire pudding also, a little trick, to stir a little of the pudding mix into the homemade gravy to give it a glaze, I reckon I make the best "Yorkies" hereabouts, and the best gravy !


My Nana did that too Nick, first time I tried to copy her I ended up with small floating dumplings all over my gravy smiley

Feb 18, 2020 - 11:07:31 AM
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1483 posts since 2/12/2009

makes a mighty fine gravy.

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