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Jan 25, 2020 - 5:32:52 PM
1075 posts since 4/13/2017

I have a two-way LMII rod. I do not wish to install it with a strip on top, because on my last neck, it was installed as such and it busted through the back of the neck. Do I just set it in the slot and glue the fretboard on, letting the tension of the rod hold it in, or should I add some two part epoxy?

Jan 25, 2020 - 6:20:41 PM

roydsjr

USA

645 posts since 5/17/2007

What I have learned about Recording King Necks is they are put in the slot and the fretboard glued on. I've bought several banjos over the last 3 or 4 years and I was able to pull them out ( they had broken Necks) with a pair of vise grips. I've made the New Necks that way and it works fine for me.

Jan 25, 2020 - 7:06:37 PM
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2799 posts since 2/18/2009

I don't glue or fasten mine, sometimes some glue squeezes into the slot when the fretboard goes on, and sometimes the rod is easy to slide out. I think Rudy posted recently about gluing his fretboards on with the truss rod out of the hole, poking a piece of brass through the hole to clean out the glue, and putting the rod in after the glue is dry, but I may be misremembering. it seemed like a good idea to me, though not one i can emulate since I mostly make necks with the truss rod slot ending at the nut and thus there is not a good way to clean out the glue.
Zach

Jan 25, 2020 - 8:16 PM
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rudy

USA

14988 posts since 3/27/2004

quote:
Originally posted by Zachary Hoyt

I don't glue or fasten mine, sometimes some glue squeezes into the slot when the fretboard goes on, and sometimes the rod is easy to slide out. I think Rudy posted recently about gluing his fretboards on with the truss rod out of the hole, poking a piece of brass through the hole to clean out the glue, and putting the rod in after the glue is dry, but I may be misremembering. it seemed like a good idea to me, though not one i can emulate since I mostly make necks with the truss rod slot ending at the nut and thus there is not a good way to clean out the glue.
Zach


I did indeed post that recently.

I have photos of the process and it's part of an entire open back build topic I'm going to post in the foreseeable future. 

I cut the 1/4" wide by 13/32" channel extending all the way from the heel to the peghead so the rod can be installed from whichever end the maker wants to use.  The through channel makes it easy to completely clean excess glue out so the rod can be inserted from the chosen end after the neck is completed, and that also allows the rod to be easily removed or replaced later if it should be necessary.

I also use the rod to "ram-rod" small pieces of moistened cloth or paper towel to assist in cleaning out the squeeze out.  I don't often use adjustable rods for banjo necks but I've been doing a series of guitar and bass necks where they are more useful, so I incorporated the two way rod into the banjo build documentation because so many feel that neck adjustability is something they want to incorporate.

Shown below is a longer guitar neck (...notice that 9th fret marker!) that has the clean out bar below it.  Also shown is how the two way rod can simply slip into the channel later on in the neck construction process, or be pulled out in the future should it be desired.

Edited by - rudy on 01/25/2020 20:32:41

Jan 26, 2020 - 4:49:54 AM

4454 posts since 11/20/2004
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A narrow strip of masking tape over the slot will help keep glue out of the channel when installing the fretboard. I have not found it to create any issues with the fitting of the fretboard.

Jan 26, 2020 - 5:45:30 AM
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rudy

USA

14988 posts since 3/27/2004

quote:
Originally posted by lightgauge

A narrow strip of masking tape over the slot will help keep glue out of the channel when installing the fretboard. I have not found it to create any issues with the fitting of the fretboard.


The problem with using tape to cover the slot is that the adhesive side of the tape is left over the channel.  It's obvious how that will effect sliding the truss rod in or out  of the channel.

The "official" StewMac rod installation directions call for laying down a wider piece of tape, spreading glue, and pulling the tape off before adding  the board.  The theory is that the glue will spread toward the channel under clamping pressure and won't go into the channel provided you are using just the right amount of glue.  (Right... frown)

I prefer to use methods that are a bit less hit-or-miss.

Jan 26, 2020 - 5:55:42 AM

Fathand

Canada

11568 posts since 2/7/2008

Did you get the low profile rod? These are only 3/8" deep, I don't see them s likely to break through the back and are available pretty cheap on Amazon, etc.

Jan 26, 2020 - 7:20:12 AM

12729 posts since 6/29/2005

It's hard for me to imagine one of these breaking through the neck on the back unless the neck is too thin or so crooked that the truss rod would be cranked way beyond its intended use attempting to straighten it.  I could more easily imagine one popping the fingerboard off.

Jan 26, 2020 - 7:48:16 AM

1075 posts since 4/13/2017

quote:
Originally posted by Ken LeVan

It's hard for me to imagine one of these breaking through the neck on the back unless the neck is too thin or so crooked that the truss rod would be cranked way beyond its intended use attempting to straighten it.  I could more easily imagine one popping the fingerboard off.


This if for Fathand too...

I did indeed make the neck thinner than I intended, but only about 1/16" thinner around the 3rd fret area. The truss rod is 3/8", and was installed a little deeper, with a filler strip on top. The whole truss rod channel was approximately 7/16" deep, and in the area is busted out, only about 1/16" or less of wood was left. The mistake was accididentally making the neck too thin, but if the truss rod didn't have a filler strip on top, it wouldnt have busted through, I dont think. That's why I dont want to use a filler strip anymore.

Jan 26, 2020 - 8:14:24 AM

12729 posts since 6/29/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Blue20Boy17
quote:
Originally posted by Ken LeVan

It's hard for me to imagine one of these breaking through the neck on the back unless the neck is too thin or so crooked that the truss rod would be cranked way beyond its intended use attempting to straighten it.  I could more easily imagine one popping the fingerboard off.


This if for Fathand too...

I did indeed make the neck thinner than I intended, but only about 1/16" thinner around the 3rd fret area. The truss rod is 3/8", and was installed a little deeper, with a filler strip on top. The whole truss rod channel was approximately 7/16" deep, and in the area is busted out, only about 1/16" or less of wood was left. The mistake was accididentally making the neck too thin, but if the truss rod didn't have a filler strip on top, it wouldnt have busted through, I dont think. That's why I dont want to use a filler strip anymore.


I have never understood the filler strip thing, except in the case of the old one-way tension rods where the filler strip was curved and would facilitate making the neck bend at a certain curve, so it was a necessity.
It's always a good idea to make a drawing, and then you can see where the truss rod is going to sit in the neck. 

In cases of super thin necks, it might be a good idea to go the other way and cut a dado on the bottom of the fingerboard and use a shallower groove in the neck to make the truss rod sit higher.

In either case you need to have some kind of drawing or notion as to where it's going to sit in the cross-section.

 

Jan 26, 2020 - 3:01:39 PM

1075 posts since 4/13/2017

Ken LeVan I am using the same neck specs as my '59 100. At the first fret, using the 3/8" two-way truss rod, I have a 3/8" of wood left under it, and of course from there, it just gets more.

Jan 27, 2020 - 5:13:32 AM
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14964 posts since 2/7/2003

If you used the hot rod and put a filler strip of wood on top of it you completely disregarded the instructions of how its installed and designed to work.

No getting around that, sorry

 

https://www.stewmac.com/How-To/Online_Resources/Learn_About_Truss_Rod_Installation_and_Repair/Hot_Rod_Adjustable_Truss_Rods.html

Scott

Edited by - desert rose on 01/27/2020 05:18:04

Jan 27, 2020 - 9:03:45 AM

jamesinkster

Canada

227 posts since 5/25/2010

The first neck i ever built was a bit too chunky, so a few necks later I decided to rasp it down to a more reasonable profile. Boom, I exposed the truss rod.

The only reason this happened was that my fingerboard was far too thick -- I'm guessing it was 1/4" at least... (I remember I had bought a fingerboard blank from a supplier and I wouldn't be surprised if I left it at full thickness... :) )
How thick is your fingerboard?
My tastes have changed -- initially I thought a big thick fingerboard looked great, now I prefer them much thinner. Even down to 1/8" on the edges for a radiused neck...

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