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Jan 23, 2020 - 12:50:26 PM

easy

USA

220 posts since 1/23/2009

Hello friends. I need to shave a bit of wood off of a rim in order to fit a tone ring. While I have no lathe in my "work shop" (garage), I do have a router. Is there any kind of router bit that is adjustable on how much it shaves off, so that I may take off just the 1/16 to 1/8 that I need? Thanks,
David

Jan 23, 2020 - 12:52:54 PM

12620 posts since 6/29/2005

quote:
Originally posted by easy

Hello friends. I need to shave a bit of wood off of a rim in order to fit a tone ring. While I have no lathe in my "work shop" (garage), I do have a router. Is there any kind of router bit that is adjustable on how much it shaves off, so that I may take off just the 1/16 to 1/8 that I need? Thanks,
David


Are you talking about shaving down the height, or the rabbet where the tone ring skirt fits?

Jan 23, 2020 - 12:58:55 PM

2769 posts since 2/18/2009

I don't know of a bit that is adjustable to that extent, the only way I know to adjust them is by putting on different sized bearings. How I do it when I need to fit a tone ring to a rim that is not able to go back on the lathe is with a router in a table. I put a straight bit in the router and find a board about the same length as the router table. I cut an arc out of the board so that the remaining board fits closely against the banjo rim. Then I use the router to cut out a small area in the center of the arc. Then I clamp the board to the router table so that the bit is inside the small area that was cut out. By moving the board and reclamping it I can make the bit cut an infinite range of depths into the side of the rim. I usually make at least 3 passes and make the cut just slightly deeper each time, rather than trying to figure out how much to take to get the ring fitted in one pass. If this doesn't make sense the way I have described it I can take a picture in the shop tonight.
Zach

Jan 23, 2020 - 2:56:15 PM

easy

USA

220 posts since 1/23/2009

Thanks guys. Ken, I am talking about the rabbet for the skirt. And thanks Zach: I'll likely be going the bearing route. I just ordered a rabbet router bit with different sized bearings: smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...TF8&psc=1
Hopefully this will make short work of it.

Jan 23, 2020 - 3:43:05 PM
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heavy5

USA

1081 posts since 11/3/2016

Maybe a bit unusual , but I've done quite a few of these using a table saw , a fine tooth blade , & a good rip fence . It's all in the set up & steady hands .

Edited by - heavy5 on 01/23/2020 15:43:43

Jan 23, 2020 - 4:22:51 PM

beegee

USA

21474 posts since 7/6/2005

you may be able to do it with a cabinet scraper. In the past, i have clamped my router inverted in a Workmate and clamped a temporary fence to allow a thin cut by feeding the rim into the bit.

Jan 23, 2020 - 4:33:54 PM

2769 posts since 2/18/2009

This is just my opinion and may not be relevant, but it looks to me like the shallowest cut you can take with that set is 1/8". I wonder if that may be a bit deeper than you want to go, but not knowing what kind of tone ring you have in mind I can't say for sure. I hope your router is variable speed, a bit that big in a single speed router will be more than I would want to handle. I experienced that when I built my first canoe and had to put a cove and bead on all the strips of wood, in my usual router the vibration was scary so I ended up buying a used one that could be run a lot slower and then it was fine. Best of luck with whatever you decide to do.
Zach

Jan 23, 2020 - 5:10:31 PM
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rudy

USA

14968 posts since 3/27/2004

quote:
Originally posted by easy

Hello friends. I need to shave a bit of wood off of a rim in order to fit a tone ring. While I have no lathe in my "work shop" (garage), I do have a router. Is there any kind of router bit that is adjustable on how much it shaves off, so that I may take off just the 1/16 to 1/8 that I need? Thanks,
David


You can set up a router table and straight router bit to cut your rim rabbet to any dimension or size you need.  You set a guide finger to ride on the side of the rim, it's quite simple.

Jan 24, 2020 - 3:49:02 AM

1978 posts since 2/7/2008

StewMac has a router bit -

stewmac.com/Luthier_Tools/Type..._Bit.html

And various bearings to rout a variety of channel depths.

stewmac.com/Luthier_Tools/Type...J3yPD_BwE

Jan 24, 2020 - 3:53:08 AM

1178 posts since 2/2/2008

quote:
Originally posted by rudy
quote:
Originally posted by easy

Hello friends. I need to shave a bit of wood off of a rim in order to fit a tone ring. While I have no lathe in my "work shop" (garage), I do have a router. Is there any kind of router bit that is adjustable on how much it shaves off, so that I may take off just the 1/16 to 1/8 that I need? Thanks,
David


You can set up a router table and straight router bit to cut your rim rabbet to any dimension or size you need.  You set a guide finger to ride on the side of the rim, it's quite simple.


You are brilliant yes 

Jan 24, 2020 - 11:15:34 AM

2769 posts since 2/18/2009

quote:
Originally posted by rudy
quote:
Originally posted by easy

Hello friends. I need to shave a bit of wood off of a rim in order to fit a tone ring. While I have no lathe in my "work shop" (garage), I do have a router. Is there any kind of router bit that is adjustable on how much it shaves off, so that I may take off just the 1/16 to 1/8 that I need? Thanks,
David


You can set up a router table and straight router bit to cut your rim rabbet to any dimension or size you need.  You set a guide finger to ride on the side of the rim, it's quite simple.


I like your homemade fence system better than mine, mine requires a different board for each diameter of rim I work on but your design works for any size rim.  It's brilliant.

Zach

Jan 24, 2020 - 11:55:06 AM
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7530 posts since 1/7/2005

I use Rudy's method and it works perfectly. If the guide block is clamped to the table with moderate pressure, you can adjust the feed by tapping lightly on the block with a small hammer or mallet. I can make adjustments of just a few thousanths of an inch with each tap.
Also, since the rim isn't clamped down, or mounted on a lathe, you can frequently check the fit without altering your setting.

The method works not only for fitting tone rings, but also for cutting binding channels on rim or resonator--etc.

DD

Jan 24, 2020 - 12:15:46 PM

easy

USA

220 posts since 1/23/2009

Yes Zach, you are correct in thinking that 1/8 may, in fact, be more than I want to shave off at once. I'm thinking I might add a layer or more of electrical tape around the circumference of the bearing in order to thicken it up just a bit, maybe bring it down to 1/16" or even less: whadya think?

Jan 24, 2020 - 12:17:51 PM

easy

USA

220 posts since 1/23/2009

Rudy, a DIY router table is an enticing idea: let me look up some designs and what not so I might think about the logistics. Thanks

Jan 24, 2020 - 1:05:26 PM
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2769 posts since 2/18/2009

For a quick temporary router table all you need is a flat piece of plywood or particle board (or aluminum plate if you have some) with a large hole drilled for the bit and three small holes (usually it's 3 in my experience) for the screws that hold the router. If you look at the bottom of your router it will have a shoe held on with screws, if you take them out it will come off and you can use it as a template to mark for where to drill the holes in the plywood. Once you have the router mounted to the table top you can screw on temporary legs from construction lumber scraps, or clamp the plywood to the edge of your workbench, or do anything else that will hold it up for you. Then it would only take a few minutes to make a thing like Rudy shows in his picture.
Zach

Jan 24, 2020 - 1:54:11 PM

conic

UK

635 posts since 2/15/2014

Great thread and grateful for your knowledge sharing again but as much as Rudys image looks interesting I just cant see what your explaining, a bit in a quiz they show you a small portion and you guess what it is

Im assuming that the top left corner is the guide fence, but the part over the router bit does not look like a rim to me

Jan 24, 2020 - 2:09:17 PM
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228 posts since 1/28/2011

quote:
Originally posted by conic

Great thread and grateful for your knowledge sharing again but as much as Rudys image looks interesting I just cant see what your explaining, a bit in a quiz they show you a small portion and you guess what it is

Im assuming that the top left corner is the guide fence, but the part over the router bit does not look like a rim to me


You are looking at it backwards.  The top left corner shows the rim.  The piece over the router bit is the guide

Jan 24, 2020 - 2:10:51 PM
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7530 posts since 1/7/2005

"Im assuming that the top left corner is the guide fence, but the part over the router bit does not look like a rim to me"

 

No, In the top left corner of the picture is the rim. The jig that the rim is spun against is shown on the lower right. When cutting, the rim is pressed against the jig.

I use the same method but rather than making the jig, I just clamp a couple short pieces of wood to the router table in a "V" shape. Or I just clamp one piece of wood on the table and use the guide fence as the second bearing surface.

DD

Edited by - Dan Drabek on 01/24/2020 14:14:23

Jan 24, 2020 - 2:30:32 PM
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7530 posts since 1/7/2005

Of course, much of the above assumes you have a router table. If not, they're not expensive, and every shop should have one.
I built my own in a few hours and for less than $20. It does the same job as a store bought table, but is quieter and has less vibration than a sheet metal model. It's a good weekend project and mine has done it's job very nicely.


Jan 24, 2020 - 3:17:49 PM

conic

UK

635 posts since 2/15/2014

Aha, OK thanks I see it now, it was that there did not seem much surface area on the jig for the rim to be stable, I have built several temporary router tables and jigs in the past so I may the try the V shaped jig sounds like a good idea.

Always interesting threads on here and much appreciated

Jan 24, 2020 - 3:49:07 PM

2769 posts since 2/18/2009

Here's the board I use for 12" rims(less the clamps, of course). I also have 11" and 10" versions but I think Rudy's idea is much better. It doesn't have to steer the rim perfectly, there's no way the rim can get too close to the bit, and if you miss a spot while going around you can just go round again till you get everything. I got this table for $10 at an auction, and bought two more like it for $2 and $1 in the following couple of years at other auctions. This table is aggravating because it has to be clamped to the workbench or else it walks around while it's running.

The second picture is what is going to be my new router table someday, I drilled the hole a month ago but have not worked on it since. Online Metals had a really good deal on 18-1/4" square by 3/8" thick 6061 aluminum plate and I bought 4 last winter, one for this, two for the bottom of the go-bar press I was building at the time, and one for future reference, or something.
Zach




Jan 24, 2020 - 4:12:01 PM

HarleyQ

USA

3078 posts since 1/31/2005

@Zachery Hoyt , Who won your Banjo? I never get email's of the winners. Thanks, Hoyt

Jan 24, 2020 - 4:14:24 PM
Players Union Member

rudy

USA

14968 posts since 3/27/2004

quote:
Originally posted by Dan Drabek

Of course, much of the above assumes you have a router table. If not, they're not expensive, and every shop should have one.
I built my own in a few hours and for less than $20. It does the same job as a store bought table, but is quieter and has less vibration than a sheet metal model. It's a good weekend project and mine has done it's job very nicely.



Dan, Your solutions are always deluxe!  A very nice job on your table, and I agree that a home brew is often far superior to the stamped steel tables that are less than desirable on a number of fronts.

I was recently asked about my router table on another forum and posted a quick shot of it.  The person asking the question was particularly interested in my "quick clamp" router retainer.  The table is made from 2 sections of laminate covered plywood (courtesy the local big box store sink cut out bin...).  There are 1/4"-20 tee nuts added and sliding wood blocks that overlap the router base and lock it into the recess cut out from the bottom.  Thar enables me to retain or remove the router in seconds if I need it for another purpose.

The router in the photo is being controlled with the foot switch so I can route using both hands and not have a neeed to start or stop the router by hand.  The foot control is something I use frequently for a variety of tools and tasks.

The fence is simply added (and adjusted) with a couple of quick clamps.  It has a port connected to my shop vac.

There's also a dedicated trim router that is dropped into the table and stays there most o the time for all those quick round-over tasks.  It can be pulled out of the routed recess to use it free hand.

Here's another of my famous "Not clear enough to understand and creating general befuddlement" photos:

Edited by - rudy on 01/24/2020 16:26:36

Jan 24, 2020 - 4:22:32 PM
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Players Union Member

rudy

USA

14968 posts since 3/27/2004

quote:
Originally posted by conic

Aha, OK thanks I see it now, it was that there did not seem much surface area on the jig for the rim to be stable, I have built several temporary router tables and jigs in the past so I may the try the V shaped jig sounds like a good idea.

Always interesting threads on here and much appreciated


The guide is made with a convex shape that matches the rim outside diameter and in combination with the table serves as a stable support for the rim as it is presented to the router bit.  The nice thing about this type of jig is that  it becomes impossible to cut too deeply.  It's quick and easy to set the cutting depth of the bit in both directions and as Dan said, it is easy to adjust the depth of cut by slightly loosening the C clamp that holds the jig to the table and giving it a love tap with a small hammer.  It is much better to sneak up on your depth with light passes rather than hogging off material.

Jan 24, 2020 - 6:23:10 PM

7530 posts since 1/7/2005

Ah, a foot switch! Gotta add one to mine.

I keep a full sized Porter Cable permanently mounted in my table, and have a nice compact DeWalt for free-handing. Well worth the expense to not have to mount and remove a lone router. I hate doing setup with my power tools. I could never deal with a ShopSmith.

Jan 24, 2020 - 7:25:53 PM
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2769 posts since 2/18/2009

I have one of those old Craftsman 1 hp routers in my current table that I got cheap at an auction years ago, but for my new table I will be using my 'good' router, a Makita RD1101. I bought another one with a burnt up motor on eBay for not very much, and am planning to mount its base to the underside of the router table. Then I should be able to pop the motor out of the base it's in now and into the base in the table pretty easily, it's designed for quick changes between a plunge base and a fixed base and I sometimes take it out of the base to make bit and collet changes easier.
Zach

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