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Jan 22, 2020 - 5:27:55 AM
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3717 posts since 5/12/2010

Last week a life long freind of mine gave me his wife's guitar. This guitar has been stored in it's case at his mother's house, and untouched since 1983 when his wife died.

Here is what is interesting to me. I took the guitar out of the case and found it was still in tune, and he assured me the case had not been opened in all those years.

It is an Aria classical guitar which plays like a dream and sounds real good. He thinks it is probably from the early seventies, but not real sure about that. Inside the accessory box was a "guitar pitch pipe" which is something you just don't see that often any more.

I don't know much about guitars, but this one seems to be a very nice instrument.

Edited by - OldPappy on 01/22/2020 05:28:28

Jan 22, 2020 - 5:47:56 AM
Players Union Member

rudy

USA

14945 posts since 3/27/2004

quote:
Originally posted by OldPappy

Last week a life long freind of mine gave me his wife's guitar. This guitar has been stored in it's case at his mother's house, and untouched since 1983 when his wife died.

Here is what is interesting to me. I took the guitar out of the case and found it was still in tune, and he assured me the case had not been opened in all those years.

It is an Aria classical guitar which plays like a dream and sounds real good. He thinks it is probably from the early seventies, but not real sure about that. Inside the accessory box was a "guitar pitch pipe" which is something you just don't see that often any more.

I don't know much about guitars, but this one seems to be a very nice instrument.


That's a pretty good indicator that it was "over-built", but that's the tradeoff for producing a good instrument that stays together over time with little or no attention.

A lot of those earlier Pac rim instruments were quite nice.  It's later when they tried to respond to players who were after a more responsive instrument at a bargain basement price point that things went a little pear-shaped.

Jan 22, 2020 - 6:21:39 AM

3717 posts since 5/12/2010

Thanks for the response Randy.

I am not much of a guitar player, but I do like to play around with them some.

The only other guitar I have was also made in Japan. It is an older Yamaha with steel strings, which I bought new back in the 70s. I always liked this Yamaha, it has very nice action and sounds better than it should for the price I paid for it.

I plan on a new set of strings for this Aria guitar, and there may be better choices for synthetic gut strings nowadays than when this one was last strung up.

Any recommendations on a set of strings?

Edited by - OldPappy on 01/22/2020 06:22:11

Jan 22, 2020 - 7:37:06 AM

1523 posts since 6/2/2010

Wow - still in tune with nylon strings. That is pretty amazing.

Jan 22, 2020 - 8:25:44 AM

3717 posts since 5/12/2010

I was amazed.

The Aria brand name is Japanese, so I assumed it was made in Japan. Looking for information I found a couple of sites listing guitars like this for sale, and am now not sure about where they were made.

I read on more than one of these sites that the Aria "AC" series of guitar (mine is an AC80) were high quality guitars hand made in Spain.  

I don't know any more than that. Don't know whether these claims are true or just hype to raise the price, but it is interesting.

I found two AC80 guitars that look like the one I have at home. The link below is one of those I found.

https://reverb.com/item/30372258-aria-ac80-concert-classical-guitar?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI_9n47MyX5wIVjJ-zCh27DQoVEAQYAiABEgJOa_D_BwE&merchant_id=140245125&pla=1&utm_campaign=1953837320&utm_medium=cpc&utm_source=google

 

Jan 22, 2020 - 10:01:03 AM

387 posts since 2/5/2014

I had an Aria that had an amazing sound. Someone gave it to me in the mid 70’s and it was pretty old then. It was literally black and tacky when I got it. A bit of elbow grease and determination showed a glorious richly colored instrument. With a new set of strings, that thing played like butter. I hauled it around with me for years, plunking away on that wide necked beast. Kids and a job took me away from playing and I gave it away to a music school. Needless to say, now I wish I had it back. The school teacher said that the Japanese were using the Arias as a way to learn how to build guitars.
You have a keeper! Enjoy it and please post a video of you playing it, I would love to hear it .

Jan 22, 2020 - 10:49:29 AM

1980 posts since 1/16/2010

Congrats Pap!

A good friend of mine has a 70’s Aria classical guitar. I haven’t played it in a long time, but I know it’s super nice, and is a solid top I believe...sounds deep and good tone.

Pap...I’d slap a set of LaBella 427’s or 820’s on it. Those are what I use, and those are what Jerry Reed used...and we know that he weren’t no slouch when it came to picking.

Jan 22, 2020 - 2:04:46 PM
Players Union Member

rudy

USA

14945 posts since 3/27/2004

quote:
Originally posted by OldPappy

Thanks for the response Randy.

I am not much of a guitar player, but I do like to play around with them some.

The only other guitar I have was also made in Japan. It is an older Yamaha with steel strings, which I bought new back in the 70s. I always liked this Yamaha, it has very nice action and sounds better than it should for the price I paid for it.

I plan on a new set of strings for this Aria guitar, and there may be better choices for synthetic gut strings nowadays than when this one was last strung up.

Any recommendations on a set of strings?


I use D'Addario Pro-Arte EJ46TT strings on my crossover.

The set has Dyna-core multi-strand basses and titanium trebles.  When you get into the better classical string sets the basses and trebles are often sold separately because the wound basses degrade much faster than the trebles and players like to mix and match the qualities that different types of strings bring to the playing experience.

Jan 23, 2020 - 5:20:28 AM

3717 posts since 5/12/2010

Rudy,

Thanks, I always value your experienced opinions. So happens, I dropped by my friend's music store yesterday and asked the same question of him and he made the same recommendation as yours. So, I put the new strings on the guitar when I got home last night and am now getting a pretty bad buzz on the 6th and 5th. Looks like this is due to wear on the nut/saddle. The guitar has evidently been played a lot. I temporarily cured the buzz by placing paper shims on the saddle, so I know what I need to do.

Jan 23, 2020 - 5:24:08 AM

3717 posts since 5/12/2010

I still have the old strings I replaced, so will measure the bass strings to see if they are larger gage than what I put on, but the saddle does look worn.

Jan 23, 2020 - 12:33:14 PM

3890 posts since 11/29/2005

My classical guitar is an early 60's Goya G-10. It's been in and out of the closet several times over the period I've had it, and, if I've put it away in tune with well-used strings, it's always been real close (at least by fret-match tuning) each time I've taken it out.

It once spent about 15 years in the closet while life interfered, and came out in tune. Love that box, and it calls to me sometimes when I've put it away for too long. It seems to like the black-package Augustines low-tension sets best.


Jan 23, 2020 - 12:48:01 PM

johnedallas

Germany

112 posts since 2/18/2005

I have an Aria concert guitar, too, dated 1992. It has a "Made in Spain" label in it, although the Aria company was Japanese at that time. It's a lovely guitar, with a very full bass. I usually have Augustine Blue or Hannabach nylon strings on it.
I used to enjoy using it as an accompaniment for solo vocal gigs, until my banjo playing improved to the point where I could do more with it than with a guitar.
Cheers,
John

Jan 24, 2020 - 5:22:34 AM

3717 posts since 5/12/2010

I haven't played much guitar in the last decade, and never was very good at it. After playing banjo for so long, even with the wider necks I use, the fretboard on this Classical guitar seems wide enough to land a plane, but I have large hands so probably won't be too difficult to get used to.

It is a nice guitar, so I will mostly just keep it in my den for when others are over to play some, I probably won't play it much myself. I have several instruments I don't really play for just that purpose. Now 3 guitars, 3 fiddles (wife plays some), 1 nice dulcimer, and a number of harmonicas which I do play some. Of course I also have banjos in fluctuating numbers.

Jan 26, 2020 - 10:45:28 AM

996 posts since 8/7/2017

If you are looking for an excuse to play it more (your post doesn't read that way), then you could play along with some of your own banjo recordings. I do that, and it's a lot of fun. I use Audacity to record my work, and find I have to time-shift the 2nd instrument a bit (with Audacity) to account for the computer time lag...until I figured that out, I was really disgusted at how poorly I could play in time with another instrument *grin*.

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