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Jan 17, 2020 - 5:12:32 PM
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70902 posts since 5/9/2007

I'm enjoying this run of the mega car auction.
Around 2000 cars going under the hammer.
The incredible strides in paint and engineering have eclipsed the value of many all-originals.

I like Barrett Jackson more than Mecum Auctions.
Mecum allows a "reserve" minimum limit which shows a lot of vehicles heading off-stage,unsold.
BJ doesn't have a minimum and everything sells.

Barrett also has more complete descriptions of each car from very experienced car guys.

Jan 17, 2020 - 6:45:39 PM
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slammer

USA

2788 posts since 12/30/2008

Thanks for the reminder Steve !!! I love the BJ auction, except I hate wiping up all my drool !!! It also makes me sick when I see cars that I used to own that I sold for next to nothin .

Slammer!!!

Jan 18, 2020 - 2:44:10 AM
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3080 posts since 7/8/2010

Steve, those auctions sure bring back a lot of memories. Thinking about my '53. Hudson Hornet. 308 straight six. Twin dual carbs. Heavy car. Couldn't be more comfy. Thanks for tweaking my memory.

Jan 18, 2020 - 3:39:15 AM
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OM45GE

USA

93694 posts since 11/7/2007

My only issue with the auctions is seeing cars like ones I used to own going for huge money. I had a 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 that I sold (for a profit) for $5,000. Now they regularly bring over $100,000. I’ve had two different Jaguar XKE roadsters that are going for similar amounts. Then there’s the Alfa Romeo, the ‘67 Ford pickup, and the ‘70 Mustang convertible, and...

Jan 18, 2020 - 5:15:50 AM
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70902 posts since 5/9/2007

My first car could have been a '58 Alfa Romeo Giulietta.
It had 38k on the odometer and was owned by Bill Thon who traded it in to Shepard's Chevrolet for a new '67 Toronado.
Bill's home had a steep driveway and he liked the front-wheel drive traction of the big Olds.
The Alfa ran and drove pefect,but Dad stepped in and said "No" as I would have a tough time finding parts.
The asking price for the little Alfa was $600.
I went with a garage-kept '63 BelAir w/25k on the odometer and bought for $300.
It still had its original set of tires.

A buddy of mine bought the Alfa and seized the motor a month later.Couldn't even find somebody to work on it and sold it for junk money.
My second car was a '67 Mustang.289/225 hp/3 sp. manual.Paid $800 for that.
If I had a place to keep them I could have stored some good cars back then,but the expense of doing so was unthinkable.
What gets me with these auctions is knowing they spent 200k on the refurbishing and sell for 100k or less.

Jan 18, 2020 - 5:56:39 AM
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1046 posts since 12/2/2013

Bill, you're an example of youth wasted on the young; OMG, owning a '67 Shelby GT350 and then selling it; WTF!!!!????!!!!. Well, your secret is safe with me:):):(

Jan 18, 2020 - 6:54 AM
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OM45GE

USA

93694 posts since 11/7/2007

Steve, my Alfa was a 1960 Guiletta Spider Veloce. It sat FAR more than it ran because of parts availability. Fun car when it was drivable though. I’ve heard it’s easier to get parts now than it was 40 years ago.

David, at the time I needed the money more than the car but I wish I had found another way.

Jan 18, 2020 - 7:16:44 AM

1046 posts since 12/2/2013

Bill, I've done the same thing in other areas; re: selling first edition photo books from the 1960s or NOT buying an original signed Ansel Adams print for $75 in 1970. Oh well.

Edited by - flyingsquirrelinlay on 01/18/2020 07:17:22

Jan 18, 2020 - 7:22:29 AM

70902 posts since 5/9/2007

Cars are so hard to save for the future.
Every molecule of moisture attacks anything metal and varmints eat everything else.

Jan 18, 2020 - 8:37:59 AM
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9255 posts since 1/15/2005

Steve ..... I love those auctions too. My first "collectible" car was a '67 GTO that I bought when I graduated from Marine Corps OCS. There was a Gunny Sgt. that worked in the mess hall who moonlighted selling used cars just outside the gate at Quantico. His lot was full of hot cars, probably repossessed from Marines that couldn't make payments! In our class guys bought a 1968 GTO Judge, 1967 Shelby Mustang GT 500, a Daytona Blue '67 Corvette, and a '68 Camaro SS convertible. I paid $1900 for my GTO. I would love to have all of them now!

Jan 18, 2020 - 8:47:01 AM
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3080 posts since 7/8/2010

Oh to still have my '59 MGA Paid $750 in 1965. The most fun car to drive. Even fun at night. It felt like I was in a small airplane. The world was my oyster.

Jan 18, 2020 - 9:30:32 AM
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heavy5

USA

1081 posts since 11/3/2016

I've been addicted to cars , bikes , aircraft , etc , all of my motor head life . Right now it's the Chrysler Crossfire built by Mercedes & Kamann 04 thru 08 in Germany . Some how I overlooked these incredible affordable pocket rockets till now ! I think they will be very collectable ,hopefully in my life time :0)
youtube.com/watch?v=a_uJT7666Y8

Jan 18, 2020 - 12:17:23 PM

1046 posts since 12/2/2013

Hi Bob, far be it for me to criticize another man's esthetic, but I much prefer the style of something like the Dodge Viper to the Crossfire.

Jan 18, 2020 - 1:55:45 PM
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heavy5

USA

1081 posts since 11/3/2016

quote:
Originally posted by flyingsquirrelinlay

Hi Bob, far be it for me to criticize another man's esthetic, but I much prefer the style of something like the Dodge Viper to the Crossfire.


Hi Dave ,

Good to see you posting as I think for awhile illness was taking taking its toll w/ you .

Well being a long time hot rodder , I too like the looks of the Viper & respect Chrysler for the accomplishment of bringing both the CF & Viper to market .      

Jan 18, 2020 - 2:06:08 PM

1046 posts since 12/2/2013

Hi Bob, thanks for the best wishes; I was recovering from a partially collapsed lung. And while I'm feeling better, no need to be on oxygen, the docs give me about two years. That's why I'm selling my RB4. Still. so nice to hear from you. Thanks, Dave

Jan 18, 2020 - 3:38:02 PM

70902 posts since 5/9/2007

We have an excellent auction around 10 miles from here called "The Owl's Head Transportation Museum".
They have shows and auctions every year.In the 80s a friend of mine bought a '32 Pontiac with a Camaro underneath.Tilt wheel,350/350 turbo,wire wheels and a gorgeous medium blue paint job with a very narrow pair of dull red pin stripes.
New frame was wrapped (overlapping turns back to front) in black electrical tape.

Whenever a hole is found in the wrap (inspected at each oil change or rough going) the tape in that section is rewrapped.
Powder coating has made frame maintenance obsolete.

Jan 19, 2020 - 9:58:58 AM

70902 posts since 5/9/2007

They got 3million for the first rear-engine Corvette off the line.

Jan 19, 2020 - 11:58:18 AM

9255 posts since 1/15/2005

Steve, I was a little surprised at the 1965 AC Cobra that only went for $215,000 (or close to that). I know the 427's bring (or used to ) closer to a million, but thought the small blocks were closer to 500k. I didn't hear the entire description, so maybe there were a few issues.

Jan 19, 2020 - 12:40:24 PM
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1046 posts since 12/2/2013

Steve, that car collection ranks right up there with Larz Anderson museum in Brookline and Sandwich Museum on Cape Cod. I nice afternoon wherever you spend it if you're a motorhead.

Jan 19, 2020 - 1:05:57 PM

70902 posts since 5/9/2007

I'll put those on my "Go to" list,David.

Our SMVTI class trip (Automotive Technology) went to the Framingham Chevy plant in '72 and watched much of the operation culminating with watching an obvious pro leading C-pillar seams in '73 Nova bodies.
He had hot lead on a kind of pallet in his left hand and a narrow spatula in the other,picking up hot lead and kind of slatting it onto the seam.
No wasted moves and done with each seam in a matter of seconds.

Some seriously powerful Corvettes and SSs came out of there.
Back then New England Speed Equipment (Boylston Ave.?) and kept their C Gas rail right in the room with the business.Tall Hilborn injector stacks on an sbc.

We stayed at Chestnut Hill overnight and got so drunk wandering on "The Common".

Jan 19, 2020 - 1:09:34 PM
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1046 posts since 12/2/2013

Steve, you were clearly just a regular visitor.

Jan 19, 2020 - 1:58:40 PM

3277 posts since 12/6/2009

I refuse to watch auctions. I had a super clean 49 ford coup with a full race engine (flathead)….I sold for 50 dollars. I had a 54 Mercury Sun Valley with the glass roof I sold for 200 dollars….I had a 53 Studebaker Commander with 55 Packard engine auto on the floor I sold for 150 dollars to my brother in law who still owes me 25 dollars of it…… I had a 55 T bird I sold for 700 dollars so I could buy a 65 Mustang coupe brand new with a 270 (2200.00)…we rebuilt it in 84 and my son took it over (free)…..now when I see auctions ,,,I cry in my boots at all the thousands they bring today. …saw the Merc go for 75 thou at an auction not too long ago…eeesshhhhh

Jan 19, 2020 - 2:49:45 PM

1923 posts since 7/23/2015

back home that Mercedes Benz coupe was the greatest shifter ever, out of three that I'd owned, and shared with my late mother. never been to an auction...

Jan 19, 2020 - 3:06:44 PM
Players Union Member

heavy5

USA

1081 posts since 11/3/2016

Steve , Mentioning the leading of seams , etc , I wonder how many younger car people know that before the Bondo type fillers , that was how body repair people filled most irregularities in sheet metal & believe me , having watched some do this , it was an art form using wood paddles & a heat source especially on a vertical surface .

Edited by - heavy5 on 01/19/2020 15:07:57

Jan 19, 2020 - 6:49:05 PM

9255 posts since 1/15/2005

quote:
Originally posted by heavy5

Steve , Mentioning the leading of seams , etc , I wonder how many younger car people know that before the Bondo type fillers , that was how body repair people filled most irregularities in sheet metal & believe me , having watched some do this , it was an art form using wood paddles & a heat source especially on a vertical surface .


Yes ..... cars that were done right use lead.  Bondo is fast and much easier, but the last thing I want is a restored car full of Bondo!

Jan 20, 2020 - 3:42:46 PM

3277 posts since 12/6/2009

quote:
Originally posted by BanjoLink
quote:
Originally posted by heavy5

Steve , Mentioning the leading of seams , etc , I wonder how many younger car people know that before the Bondo type fillers , that was how body repair people filled most irregularities in sheet metal & believe me , having watched some do this , it was an art form using wood paddles & a heat source especially on a vertical surface .


Yes ..... cars that were done right use lead.  Bondo is fast and much easier, but the last thing I want is a restored car full of Bondo!


thats where the term Lead Sled came from. Customizing before the bondo days. I did a little lead work in my day. you had to bang out what you could then  grind it....Tinned it with wiped on off lead  then apply the lead melted and pushed around with a wood paddle or Paddles....tedious for sure....learned later on bondo stayed better if you could put it on with thin layers amd mix every thing properly and also make sure gave it enough time to set up and harden properly a lot of guys didnt know that you had to water proof the inside /backside of what it was you were covering with bondo....bondo actually sucked in water over time....inside fenders especially. we still brazed in sheet metal  patches though where ever possible then used the bondo. Over the bondo to fill in scratches and dings we used body putty . That helped keep it solid a long long time. aaahhhh the good ol' days...the apprentices got the job of sanding it all.

Edited by - overhere on 01/20/2020 15:43:20

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