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Those DNA tests are foolproof, right?

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Jan 14, 2020 - 10:51:24 AM

Paul R

Canada

12053 posts since 1/28/2010

Jan 14, 2020 - 10:53:08 AM
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5549 posts since 3/6/2006

I had mine profiled, then about 300 distant cousins showed up. And they all want money.

Jan 14, 2020 - 11:51:09 AM
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Mooooo

USA

7328 posts since 8/20/2016

I was always told that I was Hinterwald. You can imagine my surprise when I find out I'm 6% Red Angus and 22% Hereford. Now I wonder if there's any truth to any of it.

Jan 14, 2020 - 4:00:13 PM
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Paul R

Canada

12053 posts since 1/28/2010

Our dog was 100% Angus.


 

Jan 14, 2020 - 5:10:27 PM
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Buddur

USA

2716 posts since 10/23/2004

Awesome. Just what I needed for court.

Wish me luck.

Jan 14, 2020 - 5:48:16 PM
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Brian T

Canada

15981 posts since 6/5/2008

My parents are not your parents. So for each of us that's 2 sets of 2 different people in the past.

My grand parents are not your grand parents. So in the past for each of us, we probably had two pairs of progenitors.

The implication is that there was a much bigger population of people in the past to account for the few of us now.
No.

So how far back should we need to go to find common ancestry?
The popular DNA mapping technology supports the claims of the genetics people that going back 10-12 generations puts us under one roof as major genetic streams of inheritance.

Example: all of the First Nations people in all of the Americas can be traced back to 4 distinct lineages that came south from Beringia. Labelled A, B, C and D. On the east coast, there is Type E which is scandanavian. This is all dissected now into dozens of closely related variants called haplotypes.

The cohot of North American males, aged 50-70, are particularly prone to post surgical sepsis.
DNA analysis is trying to find "markers" in the genetic code to predict who might be at great risk to need rapid intervention.

I have it on good authority that there are at least 2 such markers and detection is quick.
Gotta love this genetic code stuff.

Jan 14, 2020 - 7:05:09 PM
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donc

Canada

6116 posts since 2/9/2010

I got my Ancestry.Com results a year ago. It didn't account for my Swedish grandfather. It did give me a 19% as Norwegian. Six months later they sent me an update informing me that I was still 19% Norwegian but now 15% Swedish also. The 2 countries are next door neighbours. Due to the growth of their database they changed my report. They were actually able to pinpoint the province of Angermanland which was the correct birthplace of my grandfather. The rest of me is Irish, Scottish, English, and Welsh. Good luck on anything to do with the British Isles. Those people are so thoroughly mixed it would be like trying to define a New Yorker. One thing that I did find interesting is that I have 352,000 genetic connections to Southern Ontario. My Dad's family arrived there in 1831 so I guess there has been a lot of wink- wink nudge- nudge over the past 190 years. None of this has changed my life but it's been fun and fascinating anyhow.

Jan 15, 2020 - 2:38:05 PM
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53257 posts since 12/14/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Brian T

My parents are not your parents. So for each of us that's 2 sets of 2 different people in the past.

My grand parents are not your grand parents. So in the past for each of us, we probably had two pairs of progenitors.

The implication is that there was a much bigger population of people in the past to account for the few of us now.
No.


So how far back should we need to go to find common ancestry?
The popular DNA mapping technology supports the claims of the genetics people that going back 10-12 generations puts us under one roof as major genetic streams of inheritance.

Example: all of the First Nations people in all of the Americas can be traced back to 4 distinct lineages that came south from Beringia. Labelled A, B, C and D. On the east coast, there is Type E which is scandanavian. This is all dissected now into dozens of closely related variants called haplotypes.

The cohot of North American males, aged 50-70, are particularly prone to post surgical sepsis.
DNA analysis is trying to find "markers" in the genetic code to predict who might be at great risk to need rapid intervention.

I have it on good authority that there are at least 2 such markers and detection is quick.
Gotta love this genetic code stuff.


No further than Toys 'R' Us

Jan 15, 2020 - 2:55:10 PM
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Brian T

Canada

15981 posts since 6/5/2008

I bought some suction-cup little toy frogs from that store.
At random times after you stuck them down, they would pop loose with a BACK FLIP.
Next best thing to origami.

These days, I like the toy stores to shop for stuff for my grandsons to help fill up their house.

Jan 15, 2020 - 3:10:55 PM

Owen

Canada

4661 posts since 6/5/2011

...you sure you spelled it correctly there, Brian?  cheeky

Jan 15, 2020 - 3:26:28 PM
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bubbalouie

Canada

13147 posts since 9/27/2007

Years after my paternal grandfather died I was talking to my uncle about being part Irish . He said we German because he did the test. Just like the commercials we celebrated St.Patricks day & he had all the nick nacks & snuck around to play the Irish sweepstakes! 

Laurance has hit the nail on the head! The family I know is bad enough!

Same with facebook why do I whan to get reaquainted with some dorks I knew in highschool? 

Sorry Mike. No farm animals in my lineage. 

Edited by - bubbalouie on 01/15/2020 15:29:58

Jan 15, 2020 - 3:35:23 PM
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Owen

Canada

4661 posts since 6/5/2011

...geez, bubba...you knew dorks in hi school??? ...I only hung around with the "in crowd" cheeky

Jan 15, 2020 - 4:50:38 PM
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Brian T

Canada

15981 posts since 6/5/2008

Oragami? Origami? I fold.

Jan 15, 2020 - 5:32:14 PM
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bubbalouie

Canada

13147 posts since 9/27/2007

Image result for somebody disagrees on the internet cartoons

Jan 15, 2020 - 5:41:42 PM
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bubbalouie

Canada

13147 posts since 9/27/2007

Jan 16, 2020 - 10:18:35 PM

53257 posts since 12/14/2005

@ Bubbalouie:

"There, their, they're, young man.
You just calm down about people getting words wrong."

Jan 17, 2020 - 11:39:36 AM
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53257 posts since 12/14/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Brian T

I bought some suction-cup little toy frogs from that store.
At random times after you stuck them down, they would pop loose with a BACK FLIP.

Next best thing to origami.

These days, I like the toy stores to shop for stuff for my grandsons to help fill up their house.


===============================

"She shyly handed him a piece of paper, and as she watched him fold it, to caress it with his strong, manly fingers, she began to feel as if she soon might  have an origami, right then, right there. "

==================================

Ok, seriously:

I have seen little folded paper frogs, and if you press down and release, they will HOP.

Jan 17, 2020 - 12:41:37 PM

Owen

Canada

4661 posts since 6/5/2011

Thank you, Mike.

Edited by - Owen on 01/17/2020 12:48:56

Jan 17, 2020 - 1:06:43 PM
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Brian T

Canada

15981 posts since 6/5/2008

Learn to make these. It's a big deal on long plane flights.
You always take some origami paper to make frogs for the little ratty kids to play with.
Then the happy parents ply you with food and drink.

Jan 18, 2020 - 1:57:13 PM
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3246 posts since 12/6/2009

"My old mans a refrigerator repair man, what do you think about that?....he wears a refrigerator repairman’s jacket and a refrigerator repairman’s hat….and every Saturday evening he reads the Saturday evening refrigerator repairman’s news magazine …."

Tom Smothers

Jan 18, 2020 - 3:29:36 PM
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donc

Canada

6116 posts since 2/9/2010

Identity boils down to what a person sees as himself. Nobody else really cares if you are a refrigerator repairman, a lawyer, or a postman. Your friends or family probably don't really care as long as you don't come to them to borrow money. When it comes to my ethnic origin nobody cares about that either. In my case it was me who was curious. I knew that one grandfather was from Sweden and another originates from a Scottish family. I also knew that there could be a few more. Now I know. Being a chronically curious person I found it satisfying to find out. The only danger to having this knowledge is when you run the risk of boring someone to death at your next social gathering.

Jan 19, 2020 - 6:54:35 AM
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Owen

Canada

4661 posts since 6/5/2011

 
Originally posted by donc

<snip> ... When it comes to my ethnic origin nobody cares about that either.  <snip>


Ditto for me;  unfortunately that's not the way all Canadians see it [i.e. both "official" and unofficial].    no

Edited by - Owen on 01/19/2020 06:55:59

Jan 19, 2020 - 7:26:41 AM
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DC5

USA

8669 posts since 6/30/2015
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Family lore says there is some Penobscot Indian in my lineage, The only way I'll find out for sure is a DNA test. My cousin (not the same line) had one done and unknown relatives came out of the woodwork. I don't like most people all that much, especially ones I'm related to so I'm hesitant to do it.

Jan 19, 2020 - 7:48:48 AM
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Owen

Canada

4661 posts since 6/5/2011

... how did the unknown relatives find out that your cousin had had it done?     

Edited by - Owen on 01/19/2020 07:55:37

Jan 19, 2020 - 10:39:09 AM
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DC5

USA

8669 posts since 6/30/2015
Online Now

Whatever service she used, the unknown relatives also used. Apparently they notify you, and anyone you are related to that uses the service, about each other. The more they build their database, the more people they can connect. She heard from the granddaughter of my fathers brother looking for any information my cousin might have about her father. My uncle died in his 40's, and the last I heard about his son he was in jail. Did not know that he had any children.

It's another reason I don't want to use the service. Not sure if I want to find out that my father might not be my father, or my grandfather might not be my grandfather.

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