Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

320
Banjo Lovers Online


Want to hide these Google ads? Join the Players Union!
Jan 14, 2020 - 8:05:13 AM
likes this
4510 posts since 1/5/2005

Jan 14, 2020 - 8:26:42 AM

3717 posts since 5/12/2010

Wow Bart you must be a mind reader.

I was just in the shop doing some final turning on a rim and again realizing the Shopsmith machine is just not the best option for a lathe. I have two of them, and the one I use for turning rims has started to wobble which is the quill bearings wearing out again. These things turn too fast even at the lowest setting, and they are not the easiest machines to work on either. replacing the quill bearings is a complete tear down.

So, I decided it is time to get a better lathe for this kind of work, came up to post a question on recommendations, and found you have beat me to the punch..

Jan 14, 2020 - 8:33:14 AM

3717 posts since 5/12/2010

Well, not exactly what I was hoping to see, but it was entertaining!

Those guys have a lot more guts than I do, especially the one turning that wonky log. I wouldn't get within 30 feet of that operation.

What I am interested in is some suggestions for a decent lathe for turning banjo rims that doesn't cost as much as a car.

Jan 14, 2020 - 8:43:52 AM

7518 posts since 1/7/2005

I like he first one with all that weight hanging off a few screws driven into end grain. But what do I know. :->
Funny stuff.

DD

Jan 14, 2020 - 9:38:21 AM

WesB

USA

215 posts since 12/17/2014

Kinda makes your Shopsmiths look like precision tools, Andy. I like mine, but I don't turn rims on it.

Jan 14, 2020 - 9:40:59 AM

2765 posts since 2/18/2009

That is an interesting video, I like the mass production bowl making setup. I've only done a little bit of non-banjo related turning, a few bowls, chess pawns, table legs and such but someday I'd like to try more.

OldPappy, I was thinking about upgrading to a real lathe, but I have concluded that as long as I am in my current workshop space I don't really have room for a Shopsmith and a separate lathe. I found a very helpful spreadsheet that someone at Sawmillcreek.org has put together that shows all of the specs of a lot of lathes for easy comparison. The link to the spreadsheet is a few posts down the thread, but you might find the whole thread interesting, possibly.
Zach
https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?260733-Mid-Priced-Lathe-Comparison-Shopping-Results

Jan 14, 2020 - 10:00:07 AM

12595 posts since 6/29/2005

Amazing stuff!

The guy making the giant porch posts from entire tree trunks, and not even wearing a face mask was pretty incredible.  I liked the use of a section of railroad track as the tool rest.

Jan 14, 2020 - 10:20:34 AM

Bart Veerman

Canada

4510 posts since 1/5/2005

I figured you guys would get a kick out of that. I love the lamp shade :)

Jan 14, 2020 - 11:15:05 AM

12595 posts since 6/29/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Bart Veerman

I figured you guys would get a kick out of that. I love the lamp shade :)


The lamp shade is amazing.  I Thought he was shining a light through it to get a uniform wall thickness without having to stop and use a long caliper until the end where you see it's a lampshade.

Jan 14, 2020 - 11:28:09 AM

292 posts since 5/29/2015
Online Now

Some pretty scary stuff in that video. I had looked around for a lathe that was well suited to turning rims that also had a small footprint. Found this-- grizzly.com/products/Grizzly-1...the/G0844 . What do you think?

Jan 14, 2020 - 3:34:21 PM
Players Union Member

rudy

USA

14945 posts since 3/27/2004

quote:
Originally posted by OldPappy

Well, not exactly what I was hoping to see, but it was entertaining!

Those guys have a lot more guts than I do, especially the one turning that wonky log. I wouldn't get within 30 feet of that operation.

What I am interested in is some suggestions for a decent lathe for turning banjo rims that doesn't cost as much as a car.


Dan Pennington posted details about his home brew rim lathe a few years ago.  You can find it as an archived topic.  It's probably the best rim lathe build I've seen on the Hangout.

Jan 14, 2020 - 8:50:19 PM

11143 posts since 4/15/2012

Remember:

That Grizzly lathe, advertised as having a 14" capacity (or 'swing') means that there is 7" between the axis and the lathe bed. It DOESN'T mean that you can turn a 14" rim on it (should you desire to); you meed to allow for the waste that gets trimmed off when roughing out.

You might look at lathes that have a pivoting headstock, so that larger diameter non-spindle pieces can be turned beside the lathe bed. Check out the offerings by Record and Nova.

What I did was to have a faceplate drilled and tapped to take a 1"x 8 thread, and used it to replace the handwheel on a JET midi lathe, which has a much more limited swing, allowing me to turn blanks larger than 10" in diameter.

Jan 14, 2020 - 9:36:04 PM
likes this

Bart Veerman

Canada

4510 posts since 1/5/2005

quote:
Originally posted by OldPappy

Wow Bart you must be a mind reader


 

hey Andy: this morning, one heck of a screeching racket - so that was you thinking out loud? devil

Jan 15, 2020 - 6:03:03 AM
likes this
Players Union Member

rudy

USA

14945 posts since 3/27/2004

quote:
Originally posted by Meles_Meles

Remember:

That Grizzly lathe, advertised as having a 14" capacity (or 'swing') means that there is 7" between the axis and the lathe bed. It DOESN'T mean that you can turn a 14" rim on it (should you desire to); you meed to allow for the waste that gets trimmed off when roughing out.

You might look at lathes that have a pivoting headstock, so that larger diameter non-spindle pieces can be turned beside the lathe bed. Check out the offerings by Record and Nova.

What I did was to have a faceplate drilled and tapped to take a 1"x 8 thread, and used it to replace the handwheel on a JET midi lathe, which has a much more limited swing, allowing me to turn blanks larger than 10" in diameter.


I added riser blocks to my Delta Midi lathe to give it enough swing to handle banjo tasks.  I very seldom use a lathe, but it's nice to have the option if the lathe turns out to be an easier route.  The lathe was sale priced at $200 new so I thought I'd pick it up for occasional spindle work and such.

Jan 15, 2020 - 7:21:11 AM

3717 posts since 5/12/2010

A face mask would probably not provide much protection from being hit with a log anyway.

I know this from experience cutting timber.

Jan 15, 2020 - 9:40:49 AM
Players Union Member

Helix

USA

12195 posts since 8/30/2006



I met Dan. He used one cross slide and a stationery tool at a right angle to the rotation. Then he used a boring bar to do the inside and outer walls
It’s brilliantly simple
The rim is glued to a backing plate and removed with a 1/4” router
That way the rim is complete when taken off the lathe

I have a rim lathe with 2” square tubing and two cross slides
My lathe Head is readily available and has a 7” throw
I can raise my lathe head to increase throw. I made extensions like Pennington did.


Edited by - Helix on 01/15/2020 09:45:29

Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.28125