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Dec 15, 2019 - 11:51:23 AM
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1057 posts since 4/22/2018

The only dumplings I’ve had in a US recipe was chicken and dumplings, I was surprised how different they were to what I’d grown up with knowing a dumpling to be. This was the first thing I learned to cook, mum would make the stew and put it in the oven on timer before going to work. My job was to make the dumplings and add them to the stew when I got home from school. The finger hole in the middle is really important to fill with gravy and a little dollop of butter. Made with suet and flour they are another way of padding out a meal - I’m ready for a sleep now smiley




Dec 15, 2019 - 5:19:23 PM
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rinemb

USA

11851 posts since 5/24/2005

Those are mighty dumplings for sure. I imagine that hole also helps for an even cook on that size of dough. But, anything that will hold more gravy is a good thing. Brad

Dec 15, 2019 - 5:24:04 PM

Eric A

USA

351 posts since 10/15/2019
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Yes, without the dimple I think you might get a goopy spot in the middle. With potato dumplings we used to put a square of dry bread in the middle for a similar reason, to take up the space that might otherwise be undercooked.

Dec 15, 2019 - 5:34:15 PM

9216 posts since 2/22/2007
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"Dumpling" has different meanings in different locales. The dumplings I grew up eating were called "slickers", which are closer to pasta than the doughy versions. Those are probably fading away now as they are a lot of trouble to make correctly. My Grandmother was an amazing cook and she labored to roll out VERY thin slickers, which she cooked in pork stock, even when making "chicken and dumplings". The chicken was cooked separately and then combined with the dumplings.
I get something that looks very much like Jonty's photo at the local Brit Pub called "Brixton Beef Stew with Dumplings". Great comfort food on a cold night.

Dec 15, 2019 - 5:55:57 PM
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Brian T

Canada

15992 posts since 6/5/2008

Mom took every recipe she knew with her to the grave.
This reminded me of almost weekly "chicken and dumplings" when I was 12 or younger.
I should learn to make dumplings. She maybe used Bisquick?
Gooey and hot and chicken flavored.

I have lots of really good recipes, might trade for dumplings.

Dec 15, 2019 - 6:36:53 PM

Eric A

USA

351 posts since 10/15/2019
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quote:
Originally posted by Brian T

Mom took every recipe she knew with her to the grave.
This reminded me of almost weekly "chicken and dumplings" when I was 12 or younger.
I should learn to make dumplings. She maybe used Bisquick?
Gooey and hot and chicken flavored.

I have lots of really good recipes, might trade for dumplings.


yup

Chicken and (Bisquik) Dumplings

Dec 15, 2019 - 11:14:32 PM
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Brian T

Canada

15992 posts since 6/5/2008

Thank you, Eric. Have everything but the Bisquik. Buy that tomorrow. Need Mandarin oranges anyway.
I have a sad and lonely Cornish Game hen in the freezer for this. Small bird but just what I like.

Dec 16, 2019 - 12:45:47 AM
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1057 posts since 4/22/2018

quote:
Originally posted by banjo bill-e

"Dumpling" has different meanings in different locales. The dumplings I grew up eating were called "slickers", which are closer to pasta than the doughy versions. Those are probably fading away now as they are a lot of trouble to make correctly. My Grandmother was an amazing cook and she labored to roll out VERY thin slickers, which she cooked in pork stock, even when making "chicken and dumplings". The chicken was cooked separately and then combined with the dumplings.
I get something that looks very much like Jonty's photo at the local Brit Pub called "Brixton Beef Stew with Dumplings". Great comfort food on a cold night.


Bill, that’s the type I had, almost like a ribbon pasta.  I enjoy the surprises of ordering something from the menu in a diner and it not being what you imagined it to be.  I must admit though (and this is no criticism in any way) I had absolutely no idea what to expect when I ordered biscuits and gravy for the first time... who would have thunk it, scones in white sauce !!

Dec 16, 2019 - 3:47:04 AM

tmercks

USA

738 posts since 3/7/2006

Mom's dumplings for her chicken and dumplings were always her homemade biscuit dough rolled out on the counter and cut (actually, she liked to pinch them) before adding to the pot. For me, the shortcut was always to make them slightly wet, so I could drop them from a spoon, like "drop biscuits".

Dec 16, 2019 - 3:50:24 AM
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3038 posts since 7/8/2010

Nothing better than chicken pot pie with bisquick baked on top. Also separate bisquits with butter and honey. Mom knew how to feed her six kids.

Dec 16, 2019 - 3:58:51 AM

Eric A

USA

351 posts since 10/15/2019
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The dumplings I mostly grew up on were more like homemade pasta. Flour, salt, eggs. Mix them up and drop with a spoon into broth. If you want, you can roll them out and cut into actual noodles, or get a gadget that will make them into german spatzle.

A completely different animal from the fluffy biscuit kind.

Dec 16, 2019 - 6:29:50 AM
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rinemb

USA

11851 posts since 5/24/2005

My wife looks for any reason to put spaetzle in soups or use as a buttered side. I think we have 3 utensils for making this type of dumpling. She has never tried her family's method of just using a board and knife.

Brad

Dec 16, 2019 - 6:36:44 AM

Eric A

USA

351 posts since 10/15/2019
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quote:
Originally posted by rinemb

My wife looks for any reason to put spaetzle in soups or use as a buttered side. I think we have 3 utensils for making this type of dumpling. She has never tried her family's method of just using a board and knife.

Brad


Try the board and knife sometime.  You'll be thankful for the gadgets.yes

Dec 16, 2019 - 8:00:27 AM
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rinemb

USA

11851 posts since 5/24/2005

Nice thing about spaetzle size dumblings...is pan frying the next day leftovers in butter to get some scattered browning and crisping! Brad

Dec 16, 2019 - 8:02:46 AM
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14497 posts since 12/2/2005

At the risk of massive thread drift... shall we discuss gnocchi?

Dec 16, 2019 - 8:06:01 AM
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rinemb

USA

11851 posts since 5/24/2005

quote:
Originally posted by eagleisland

At the risk of massive thread drift... shall we discuss gnocchi?


laugh  May we start with just, how do you pronounce gnocchi?  Brad

Edited by - rinemb on 12/16/2019 08:06:51

Dec 16, 2019 - 8:19:48 AM
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Eric A

USA

351 posts since 10/15/2019
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quote:
Originally posted by eagleisland

At the risk of massive thread drift... shall we discuss gnocchi?


I was gonna head off toward chinese potstickers and /or polish pierogi.  So, sure, drift away.

Edit: and russian pelmeni!

Edited by - Eric A on 12/16/2019 08:23:16

Dec 16, 2019 - 8:52:41 AM
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Eric A

USA

351 posts since 10/15/2019
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The really awesome thing about russian pelmeni is now you have an excuse to slam a couple shots of vodka for supper.

Dec 16, 2019 - 9:17:43 AM
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Brian T

Canada

15992 posts since 6/5/2008

Eric found the recipe. Many thanks again. What I'm looking for is the dough/fluffy baked-on-the -chicken-stew kind of dumplings.


There are maybe 800 different terms for pasta, about 500 are local/regional names.
I was in a deli in Melbourne, Australia, back maybe 1971, they had 60 shapes.

I can make several kinds of scratch pasta. Not hard but you need to know some tricks.
Many shapes, I like to buy straight Unico durum semolina.

Dec 16, 2019 - 10:38:53 AM
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14497 posts since 12/2/2005

quote:
Originally posted by rinemb
 

laugh  May we start with just, how do you pronounce gnocchi?  Brad


Know how Curly would say "nyuk nyuk nyuk?"

Sorta like that, only "nyokki."

Dec 16, 2019 - 10:54:11 AM
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14497 posts since 12/2/2005

So gnocchi. One of the classics is a spinach/ricotta one, and I've not tried it for the simple reason I'm not all that fond of spinach.

Potato gnocchi is another story. Forget the pre-made ones you can buy in the grocery store. Too dense and chewy for my taste. I like them so tender they just barely hold together and then pretty much fall apart in your mouth.

It might take a couple of attempts to get a feel for this, but there are two keys to success. First, you don't want to use a mealy potato like a Russet. Those definitely have their place - nothing better for bakers - but old chef's potatoes - once they get a little bit of wrinkle on them - are actually best. I find spuds like Yukon Gold too waxy for this, though they will work in a pinch.

I generally try to cook them in their jackets, then peel them when they're just done (hint: hold them in a kitchen towel. Little bastitches are HOT).

Put them through a ricer or, if you have a stand mixer with a meat grinder attachment, through that. Next, we add flour. How much? JUST ENOUGH, and that's the best I can tell you. You add flour, kneeding, until the dough can hold together but is still slightly sticky. Ball it up. Let it rest at least an hour.

You need a very well-floured surface for this next step (and before taking it, set a large pot of salted water on the stove and start it towards a boil).

Cut a piece of dough. On the floured surface, start rolling it with your hands until you have an elongated piece of dough about1/2" to 3/4" in diameter. Cut this strand into roughly 1/2 inch segments. Make sure everything is well floured.

Now, you can cook them like that. But the classic way is to press them against a fork so there are ridges on the back and a thumbprint on the front. Cooks faster and more surface area to hold sauce.

Once you get them prepped, drop them in batches into the boiling water. They're done cooking when they float. Remove them with a spider or slotted spoon and drop them right into a bowl of ice water to stop the cooking. Takes about four or five minutes per batch, tops.

You can hold them for a bit at this stage. Sauces? a Bolognese is very nice - heat the Bolognese, add your gnochhi, bring to heat and serve.

But here's my favorite way to do them. Butter a casserole dish large enough to hold the gnocchi. Put a cup and a half of heavy cream on the fire to reduce by about 1/3. At that point, whisk in about a cup of grated or shredded Parmesano Reggiano cheese. When incorporated, add whisk in four to six ounces (weight) of goat cheese. Adjust seasonings with salt and pepper; you want this to be slightly on the salty side because the gnocchi themselves are pretty much unseasoned.

Fold the sauce into the gnocchi and place all in the casserole. Bake at around 350 for about 20 to 25 minutes. Finish by hitting it under the broiler until the top starts browning attractively. Serve, garnished with chopped parsley.

This can be either a standalone pasta course or a fabulous side.

Edited by - eagleisland on 12/16/2019 10:57:24

Dec 16, 2019 - 11:49:14 AM
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Eric A

USA

351 posts since 10/15/2019
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Potstickers, pelmeni, and pierogi are all filled dumplings, with a common chinese ancestry. Various waves of invading hordes brought them westward. I love them all, but the only one I make myself is the potsticker, which has become a new year's eve tradition for us. I try to keep it as dirt simple as I can.

I buy pre-made wrappers. Making your own is a big job.  Either Gyoza (round) or Won Ton (square) wrappers will work, but I always get Won Ton wrappers. We don't mind a little extra noodle on the corners. One package (about 12 oz) should be enough for 1 pound of meat.

I use just ground pork. Optional to add some chopped veggies like cabbage, scallion, water chestnut. Again, dirt simple approach it to just buy a small bag of ready to eat cole slaw mix.

Get some Hoisin Sauce, and a bottle of pre-made potsticker or gyoza sauce. Seems like everybody in our family likes a different brand, so our cupboard is always full of various bottles.

Start adding hoisin sauce to your ground pork a hefty tablespoon at a time, and maybe some potsticker sauce, until the whole bowl smells "chinesey" enough for you. Not scientific, but it works.

Then you have to fill and fold your potstickers. Better for you to google how to do it than for me to try to explain. If I'm not cooking them that evening, I freeze them on a cookie sheet with some wax paper under them, then bag them up.

Fry in your best nonstick pan that has a lid. I use a store bought "wok oil" that already has some garlic/ginger flavors in it. Fry a panful just to a little brown on the bottom, then add water to about halfway up the potstickers, cover and simmer until the water is about gone. Remove the lid and fry to a yummy looking brown on the bottom, and serve with potsticker sauce and a bowl for the table of chopped scallions.

While typing this up I found an old link I had saved with a full recipe, including how to fold them and make your own sauce. Mine look pretty much like the ones in the picture, but I saved a lot of labor with shortcuts.  Filling and folding them is the most work, so we usually get two or three of us together to do it.  Many hands make light work!

Potstickers!


 

Edited by - Eric A on 12/16/2019 12:01:06

Dec 16, 2019 - 12:23:50 PM
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1057 posts since 4/22/2018

Drift away chaps, drift away..... There’s some cracking subjects coming up in this thread now.

Dec 16, 2019 - 12:28:04 PM

14497 posts since 12/2/2005

Nice, Eric. That sauce in the recipe you linked is pretty close to how I make it, except that I add a bit of sweetness to it. Mirin (sweetened rice wine) if you've got it; some sake sweetened with some sugar if you don't.

Edited by - eagleisland on 12/16/2019 12:28:32

Dec 16, 2019 - 12:44:11 PM
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Eric A

USA

351 posts since 10/15/2019
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quote:
Originally posted by eagleisland

Nice, Eric. That sauce in the recipe you linked is pretty close to how I make it, except that I add a bit of sweetness to it. Mirin (sweetened rice wine) if you've got it; some sake sweetened with some sugar if you don't.


Yeah.  If I hadn't found that link, I would have said mostly soy sauce, maybe a little water to cut the saltiness, with a dash of sesame oil, a dash of rice vinegar, some chopped garlic, scallion, ginger.  From there, my wife and I disagree.  I like some heat, she likes some sweet.  Sometimes we compromise with both.  Last new year's I made my own, and the guests loved it, practically drinking it right down, the barbarians! 

The sauce is critically important.  To be brutally honest, the whole thing is going to taste mostly like your chosen sauce.  Better to refine the sauce recipe, or find bottled you really like, than stress too much about the filling.  I like some heat, wife some sweet, daughter just straight up salty.

Edited by - Eric A on 12/16/2019 12:54:46

Dec 16, 2019 - 12:58:53 PM
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14497 posts since 12/2/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Eric A

Potstickers, pelmeni, and pierogi are all filled dumplings, with a common chinese ancestry.


Pierogi I know, though I've never made them - and wouldn't mind a tutorial! Never even HEARD of pelmini and would like to know more.

On the subject of Chinese dumplings... which I HAVE made (both from scratch and using wonton wrappers)... there's a lovely scene involving the making of dumplings in a hit movie from a year or two ago. It's a rom-com called Crazy Rich Asians - if you haven't seen it, it's both rather silly and a lot of fun.

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