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Dec 13, 2019 - 12:04:45 PM
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Bribak

USA

439 posts since 8/18/2010

Hello all.  Thought some of you might enjoy this.  Each band member talks about some aspect of his instrumentation.  Enda goes into the design of his Nechville banjo.  His segment starts at about 11:55.  I do like the tone of this banjo.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZrGVI430pi0

Dec 13, 2019 - 12:09:11 PM

Bribak

USA

439 posts since 8/18/2010

Just curious...he talks about the longer neck giving more resonance. But then he capoes up two frets. Wouldn't that negate any extra resonance he gained by the longer neck?

Dec 13, 2019 - 12:16:17 PM

2444 posts since 3/9/2006

Excellent! I've been waiting to hear Enda play this banjo and explain how it was designed.

Dec 13, 2019 - 12:20:21 PM

2444 posts since 3/9/2006

quote:
Originally posted by Bribak

Just curious...he talks about the longer neck giving more resonance. But then he capoes up two frets. Wouldn't that negate any extra resonance he gained by the longer neck?


 Not as I understand it. I believe the longer neck will give you that tone regardless of where you capo. Of course, your pitch will be raised as you go up the neck.  When I capo my five string banjo I do not hear a huge difference in tone, only pitch. 

Dec 13, 2019 - 2:05:42 PM

Bribak

USA

439 posts since 8/18/2010

quote:
Originally posted by captbanjo
quote:
Originally posted by Bribak

Just curious...he talks about the longer neck giving more resonance. But then he capoes up two frets. Wouldn't that negate any extra resonance he gained by the longer neck?


 Not as I understand it. I believe the longer neck will give you that tone regardless of where you capo. Of course, your pitch will be raised as you go up the neck.  When I capo my five string banjo I do not hear a huge difference in tone, only pitch. 


Interesting.  I'm in the process of ordering a tenor guitar and will be making a decision as to the desired scale.  I've been wrestling between 23 and 22 inches.  My main goal is to get the most resonant full-size guitar tone I can but still keep it left-hand playable.  Sounds like it is a no-lose situation if I order the 23 inch.  I could always tune down a 1/2 step and capo up one fret if I wanted a little easier fingering down the road - and still benefit from gained resonance.  Does that make sense?

Dec 13, 2019 - 2:48:44 PM

631 posts since 2/19/2012

I really enjoyed watching that. Thanks for posting, OP.

As for scale length, I doubt if you will see much difference in playing. The actual difference in span between the frets isn't much. I'd go for the likely better sound and intonation with the longer scale, everything else being equal.

Dec 13, 2019 - 4:55:05 PM

Bribak

USA

439 posts since 8/18/2010

quote:
Originally posted by Parker135

I really enjoyed watching that. Thanks for posting, OP.

As for scale length, I doubt if you will see much difference in playing. The actual difference in span between the frets isn't much. I'd go for the likely better sound and intonation with the longer scale, everything else being equal.


Enda is just amazing.
I have both 23 inch and 22 inch scale banjos. The 22 is a little easier, but not significantly. Tone is priority. 

Dec 14, 2019 - 4:20:46 AM
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DSmoke

USA

785 posts since 11/30/2015

Please be aware that his banjo was designed to NOT sound like an Irish tenor. As for scale length, you must also consider the width and profile of the neck. I've had 23" scale banjos that were easier to play the first 5 frets with moving than 21" scale banjos. The neck wood and length are very important to the tone and resonance of a banjo. I'm not sure if that is as true with guitars though due to a different construction, but definitely worth looking into.

Dec 15, 2019 - 11:17:59 AM
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Bribak

USA

439 posts since 8/18/2010

It's funny. Coming from a flathead bluegrass banjo background, I miss the "growl" and sustain of the flathead tone. I don't find the archtop sharper percussive tone as pleasing to the ear - especially when playing alone. I have a really nice Irish Clareen banjo but find myself sometimes wishing I'd opted for the flathead tonering version of it. I know that's not the standard traditional Irish sound and I'm sure it wouldn't have "cut through" as well when playing with other instruments - but 95% of the time I'm playing at home by myself anyway. I also have a 12 inch Ome Juniper open-back tenor that has a deep sound and is really sweet and buttery played closer to the neck - especially for slower tunes. I find myself constantly switching back and forth for variety. We're lucky to have so many choices. I don't think I've yet found my Holy Grail of tenors though. Maybe it doesn't exist with the shorter scales we're dealing with.

Dec 15, 2019 - 6:17:34 PM

149 posts since 4/5/2016

I think he he means that when he plays it upcapoed (to back up songs and the like, as he demonstrates in the vidoe) is when he gets the greater resonance. I can't imagine how the extra frets down the neck would increase the resonance while it's capoed.

Dec 15, 2019 - 6:21:53 PM

149 posts since 4/5/2016

I prefer the flathead sound too. There are professionals that play a flathead. Angelina Carberry for one.

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