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Dec 12, 2019 - 6:36:35 PM
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Brian T

Canada

15981 posts since 6/5/2008

Originally, this used pecans, almonds and hazel nuts.
My kids wanted all pecans because the wrinkles hold more curry powder.
Shelled ripe walnuts are just about as good and a heap cheaper.
The crust in the pot begins to burn and smoke after the second batch.
You have to stop and clean out the pot with a good soak.

You need a deep pot, say 12" x 12" and preheat the oven to 350*F.
Find a full size sheet pan and a heat proof spatula.
You need little dishes to measure everything = this is done in minutes,
you don't have time to mess with measuring anything before the lot BURNS.
I assume you measured the ingredients.

3 TBSP cooking oil in the pot on high heat.
Add a few mustard seeds and watch for them to pop as the oil gets hot enough.
Dump in 2 tsp cumin seeds and 2 tsp each yellow and black mustard seeds.
Start stirring. Do not stop stirring.
Add 3-4C nuts like unsalted nut mix, pecans or walnuts or a mix.
Keep stirring.
Add 2-4tsp mild & savory curry powder of your choice.
As you stir, add 1 tsp fine salt of your choice.
Add a spray/sprinkle of 3-4 tbsp soya sauce.
This is the glue to stick the seeds and curry powder to the nuts.
>>> Keep your nose out of the fumes, this might start to smoke by now = off the heat.
Spread on a sheet pan and oven-roast for no more than 10 minutes.
Watch carefully, they burn easily.
= = =
I'll crack through 2 batches, takes a whole 30 minutes and I'm done for Christmas.
Store in 1 liter canning jars at room temp.

Dec 12, 2019 - 6:44:17 PM
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rinemb

USA

11846 posts since 5/24/2005

This is new to me...ad far as I can recollect. What is the background to curried nuts on North America. Brad

Dec 12, 2019 - 7:32:22 PM
Players Union Member

Brian T

Canada

15981 posts since 6/5/2008

Once upon a time, long ago and far away, my little kids gave me a curry cookbook.
It had all sorts of recipes for making up my own curry powders.
All sorts of recipes for curried-just-about-anything, if you like that savory sense.

As luck would have it, the book flopped open to the Curried Nuts page.
As luck would have it, I had everything I needed in the house already.

The original was quite pale so most of the quantities have been hyped up over the years.
I'll guess 35 years ago, at least.

I use a cheap bag of curry powder that I buy in an East Indian grocery store in the city.
I can't read the label (makes me feel illiterate) but I recognize the picture
so I know what to buy.
Very savory and aromatic but not pepper/spicy hot, which I no longer have any use for.

Dec 12, 2019 - 7:40:05 PM
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14901 posts since 2/7/2003

Could easily have Caribbean or Jamaican roots, curry is VERY popular in this region

Scott

Dec 12, 2019 - 8:10:09 PM
Players Union Member

Brian T

Canada

15981 posts since 6/5/2008

Likely one of the lasting parts of the influence of the British Imperial aquisition of territories,
included India.
Curried green beans with bacon has been a best seller in season.

Another fine example would be Crab Rangoon from Raffle's Hotel, Rangoon , Burma.
A bit of a fiddle to put together but you can fake it and bake it if you won't deep fry the original.

Dec 12, 2019 - 8:56:05 PM

14901 posts since 2/7/2003

Exactly.

Caribbean Curry is one of my favorites and it pure colonial influenced. Indian laborers sent to Jamaica etc for cheap work

Scott

Dec 12, 2019 - 11:45:38 PM
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Brian T

Canada

15981 posts since 6/5/2008

February in Canada is "Black History" month. In the nearest city, there are weekly African and Carrib cooking classes that are worth any cost to attend. Fine edible entertainment.

What amazed me was their ability to source all kinds of foods and spices locally
that I'd never heard of before.
I have learned a lot and have come home with several almost weekly favorites.

At the same time, I think that this has been a serious driver ( plus TV chef shows)
for herb & spice companies that sell a huge spectrum of herbs and spices.

When I taught economic botany, my first remark was that the most valuable things on earth come from plants. Legal or otherwise, there's the money.

Dec 13, 2019 - 6:02:33 AM
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rinemb

USA

11846 posts since 5/24/2005

I will have to admit that I have never sought out curry flavored anything, but enjoy it a bit when served to me. I have rarely cooked with it. I need to pursue that a bit more. The nuts do sound interesting, though.

Story...Years ago when I was staying in little old local motels in small towns throughout the Midwest, many were being bought out by Pakistan, etc doctors coming to America. They bought them for investment and to bring family members over to run them and have a place to live in USA. Trouble was, all the bedding, and the towels, and the lobbies were so inflitrated with curry fragrance, that it was a bit offensive to me...at the time. I guess I should get over it. Missing some good cuisine me thinks. Brad

Dec 13, 2019 - 6:54:57 AM
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1056 posts since 4/22/2018

Phew - it is a recipe after all....... when I saw the title I was worried that Brian had sat down too quickly in a very hot bath.

You can’t beat a bowl of spicy nuts wit a pint or two - can you guys in the US & Canada get hold of Bombay mix? That’s an awesome spicy snack too have to hand.

Dec 13, 2019 - 9:58:52 AM
Players Union Member

Brian T

Canada

15981 posts since 6/5/2008

Jonty: is that like a mechanic retorquing your lug nuts?
I'm not interested in Vindaloo. Patak's Garlic Pickle can melt your eyebrows.
Biryani and Butter Chicken can keep me happy.

I actually enjoy all the prep to make Pakora.
I have nmade them from scratch a few times.
I was gifted a couple of bags or pakora flour & spice mix to try.
Always suspicious of somebody else's kitchen vision.
Literally, we shall see.

Dec 13, 2019 - 1:13:01 PM
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Mooooo

USA

7328 posts since 8/20/2016

I'm interested in trying this with the curry powder I mixed together for my jamaican patties. The recipe sounds delicious, but I'm probably not going to ask my buddies to try my curried nuts.

Dec 13, 2019 - 4:16:40 PM
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Brian T

Canada

15981 posts since 6/5/2008

Make a batch of curried nuts. I hope that you're pleased with the result.
My guts don't do raw nuts anymore at all. Roasting cooks them = digestible.

The recipe is as much about a coating technique as it is about food.
I'm tempted to use a herb & spice mix meant as a BBQ dry rub for ribs.
Can't see why the Jamaican Pattie seasoning shouldn't work well.

Dec 13, 2019 - 6:24:25 PM

bubbalouie

Canada

13147 posts since 9/27/2007

Brian, You should lay some smoke lay to them. Two hours at 250*. Butter up some raw almonds & mix in your favorite spices. You can do maple sirup/cinnamon, curry, Tex mex whatever you like!

I see we can get that Bombay mix that Jonty mentioned. 

Dec 13, 2019 - 7:13:38 PM
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Brian T

Canada

15981 posts since 6/5/2008

I don't like almonds. Never did. Must have been some traumatic event when I was a little kid.
They are like hazel nuts, don't hardly hold a lick of curry powder compared to a wrinkly pecan.
Plus, they have no chew, just snap into pieces. Not what I'm looking for.

I like the taste of roasted pecans and walnuts. Oil and salt of some kind (Spanish Matiz smoked Mediterranean sea salt) would be worth a try. Same sort of deal as toasting sesame seed for a dish.
Next time I light the smoker, I'll reheat a mesh tray of pecans with the apple wood smoke hour.

Must write some notes in my cookbook. BTW, Curried Nuts is #1.7 in the Hors d'ouvre section.

Dec 14, 2019 - 10:40:25 AM

2105 posts since 4/5/2006

X#3 opened my eyes to the spices by introducing me to East Indian food. That lady definitely had a talent in the kitchen.  I need to learn how to "bookmark" this page on the iPad. Thanks for posting.

Dec 14, 2019 - 11:05:25 AM
Players Union Member

Brian T

Canada

15981 posts since 6/5/2008

I compiled a digital cookbook, more than 30 years ago.
Everything that I was making to feed my kids that they really liked.

It is kept within my little family except for the odd "leak" like Curried Nuts.
The real secrets are the herb and spice mix recipes. I have traded for some of those.
I owe some taste treats to Paddy and Mopick from the BHO.

Probably 250 recipes, some dead wood got carved off over the years and replaced with better things. Cold marinated calamari (#6.4) comes to mind. Deep-fried dessert wonton (#13.25) stuffed with sweet-spiced mango. Garnish of powdered sugar and cinnamon.

Ted & Shemane Nugent's "Kill It & Grill It" is a very good meaty treatise.

Dec 14, 2019 - 1:01:22 PM

figmo59

USA

29769 posts since 3/5/2008
Online Now

Phew ...!

Thought you were gonna say ...
Rocky Mt...oysters.....

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