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Geminid meteor shower.....

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Dec 8, 2019 - 6:40:28 AM
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Owen

Canada

4661 posts since 6/5/2011

...for those so inclined:  https://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/geminids-2019-1.5382843?fbclid=IwAR3vnOXUbxtoMAV5M5PRtnfWFxIc4h7ZSoazIneFWnZOiDSIkqddG9qPj9M

Edit: Well, I suppose it's happening whether one is/isn't inclined.......

Edited by - Owen on 12/13/2019 15:13:39

Dec 8, 2019 - 10:22:04 AM
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Tommy5

USA

3444 posts since 2/22/2009

I don’t think I have actually seen a meteor from the Gemini shower , the thing happens when it is very cold and cloudy here in Chicagoland. The full moon this year doesn’t help. The Peruses shower in August is much easier to see as the weather is generally better.

Dec 9, 2019 - 9:14:06 PM

Paul R

Canada

12053 posts since 1/28/2010

I've never seen a meteor. Could have come close - our parents owned a 1950 Monarch convertible.

(BTW, thanks for the link/info.)

Dec 10, 2019 - 12:57:46 AM

1056 posts since 4/22/2018

They peak here over the coming weekend. I’ll be heading up a nearby mountain to watch them with a hot flask and a hip flask. The Persids in the summer I can watch from my back garden but the gemenids require a trip out due to their direction and my neighbours penchant for illuminating his lawn all night.

As an aside, on a recent trip to Scotland, on two separate nights I saw two of the most impressive shooting stars I’ve ever seen whilst sitting in a high seat. They were visible with streaks/tails for what seemed an incredibly long time.

Dec 10, 2019 - 5:50:02 AM
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DC5

USA

8663 posts since 6/30/2015

The weather here, combined with the full moon, will not be cooperative. I use to go out and watch the Geminids from my hot tub, which offered pretty good viewing, and some warmth - though the steam would give some distortion. The towns around me, along with the race track next door have created so much light pollution over the last 15 years or so that viewing from here is no longer optional.

Dec 10, 2019 - 6:51:21 AM
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Owen

Canada

4661 posts since 6/5/2011

Clear sky last nite, but  too c-cc-co-ld.    Will try it again, but next time I'll put a coat on. [Edit: that's regular stuff PLUS a coat, not just a coat.]

Edited by - Owen on 12/10/2019 06:52:21

Dec 10, 2019 - 7:15:40 AM
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1056 posts since 4/22/2018

quote:
Originally posted by Owen

Clear sky last nite, but  too c-cc-co-ld.    Will try it again, but next time I'll put a coat on. [Edit: that's regular stuff PLUS a coat, not just a coat.]


Owen, I’ve just been checking out the current temps in your neck of the woods - I can thoroughly understand how you’d not want to be hanging around outside too much.  We would grind to a halt at half those temperatures.

Dec 10, 2019 - 6:14:57 PM
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Brian T

Canada

15981 posts since 6/5/2008

Nice idea, I'll look out if the sky finally clears. Thanks for the reminder.
My neighborhood is not well lit, I might be able just to look out a window.

I used to have the chance to watch the Perseid meteor shower in August from out at the lake on the great plains.
One year, must have been a big one every 5 seconds? 30 minutes and everybody wanted to go back down into the valley and into the house.

Dec 10, 2019 - 6:26:41 PM

bubbalouie

Canada

13147 posts since 9/27/2007

I didn't post here because i'm choked that it's always overcast or there's a full moon for every meteor shower here on the wet coast. I've seen maybe half a dozen shooting stars in years of checking out meteor showers.

You might see that many on a normal night in Alberta! 

Dec 10, 2019 - 11:26:18 PM

Paul R

Canada

12053 posts since 1/28/2010

I had hours to check tonight - back and forth to Prince Edward County for music. But the danged "clouds got in my way".

Dec 11, 2019 - 3:02:07 AM
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Helix

USA

12135 posts since 8/30/2006

We have a great sky field here in the desert. There's a meteor shower for each sign of the zodiac, so I guess there are Virgids and Leonids.

Then one night a few years ago we saw a big green meteor come apart and scatter.

Then there were these "others", two of them in fact from the security footage, that blasted in and lit up the entire desert sky with WHITE light. I saw them. I was VERY impressed. It was like the archangel Gabriel putting on the brakes. The authorities went out looking for debris, but none was found, darn. There were palm tree shadows, everything was silhouetted from Northern Arizona to Phoenix.

No drift: several objects have sailed between the moon and the earth lately, like bus-sized rocks, then a skyscraper went by, like an extinction event. The first one in '92 wasn't disclosed until '97, but lately we're being more candid about "events."

Like playing at the jam: "stay tuned." If we get nuclear winter, use your banjo to signal with, that's what they're for.


Edited by - Helix on 12/11/2019 03:03:58

Dec 11, 2019 - 6:48:39 AM
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DC5

USA

8663 posts since 6/30/2015

The predicted cyclic meteor showers are the remnants of commits and are little more than dust particles that burn up high in the atmosphere. The bigger meteorites that actually hit the Earth are pieces of rock and asteroids left over from the beginning of the solar system. There are a lot of these orbiting between Earth and Mars. These also break up either in the atmosphere, or upon contact with the planet surface. I visited the meteor crater in Arizona last December. A lot of money was spent trying to mine down to find the meteor as these are mostly composed of iron. It was never found, because it wasn't there, the debris was scattered all over the desert floor. The same would be true of the dinosaur killing asteroid, it would have been completely shattered, similar to a nuclear explosion. Lots of dust and pieces, but no remaining big chunk.

Dec 11, 2019 - 7:15:39 AM

bubbalouie

Canada

13147 posts since 9/27/2007

Years ago I was in a park with friends & somebody said Look at that! We all looked & it was so big & long that we all saw it! It was about 8:30 PM. The sun was still up. Lot's of other people saw it & reported it as a jet crash.

Turned out to be  meteor.

Dec 13, 2019 - 1:54:51 PM
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Helix

USA

12135 posts since 8/30/2006

DC5 It turns out when they were excavating Meteor crater, they went straight down. A meteor coming in at an angle also leaves a round hole, they proved it with a Winchester, so they began to excavate at an angle and that's where they found the nickel core, it's still there,but they had run out of money at that time. The displaced mantle is all over the place.

Dec 13, 2019 - 3:40:55 PM
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bubbalouie

Canada

13147 posts since 9/27/2007

I have a piece of the Odessa Meteorite a friend got for me in Texas. 

The Tunguska meteorite or comet that hit Siberia flattened 2000 sq. Km. of forest & didn't leave much debris!

 http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20160706-in-siberia-in-1908-a-huge-explosion-came-out-of-nowhere

Edited by - bubbalouie on 12/13/2019 15:43:26

Dec 13, 2019 - 4:04:25 PM
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bubbalouie

Canada

13147 posts since 9/27/2007

I lived in Ontario & remember this one hitting a Chev Malibu. It really increased the sale resale price!

https://www.usatoday.com/story/travel/nation-now/2017/10/05/peekskill-meteorite-car-paris-25th-anniversary-show/737238001/

I'll look a little more but I think this one was part of a string of metoerites from the same source.

Dec 13, 2019 - 4:22:38 PM

bubbalouie

Canada

13147 posts since 9/27/2007

This was in our local news when I lived back there too. The guys cows showed him where it hit!

https://www.cbc.ca/archives/entry/1994-a-farmers-five-billion-year-old-meteorite

Edited by - bubbalouie on 12/13/2019 16:25:01

Dec 13, 2019 - 4:55:15 PM

bubbalouie

Canada

13147 posts since 9/27/2007

Owen you might have heard of the prairie meteorite hunt. They used to go to small towns & put up posters about what they were looking for & come back & meet the locals with their rocks.

This article is from around 2000 but they have been doing it for years. I heard of a guy that used to use a really heavy rock to hold his barn door. He took it in & it was a meteorite. Farmers are familiar with rocks.

https://cseg.ca/technical/view/the-prairie-meteorite-search

Edited by - bubbalouie on 12/13/2019 16:55:57

Dec 13, 2019 - 5:18:18 PM

bubbalouie

Canada

13147 posts since 9/27/2007

My GoogleFu is strong tonight! I found this & he's from Manitoba!

https://www.explore-mag.com/the-meteorite-hunter 

Dec 13, 2019 - 6:51:14 PM
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Brian T

Canada

15981 posts since 6/5/2008

There was a TV series that I watched not so many years ago:
Two guys with metal detectors, 10' x 15', that they could tow behind a quad.
They travelled all over the world, digging up iron meteorites.
About the only hand held analytical equipment they needed was a magnet.

One must have been nearly 24" across. It was about 6' down in the dirt in a farm field.
They got it out with a back-hoe.
Some place in South America, they just walked around picking up marble sized pieces.

Apparently BIG BUCKS from collectors and jewellry makers.

Find Reindeer Lake in central-northern part of the Canadian province of Saskatchewan.
Near the south end is a circular bay, Deep Bay. Crater.

Dec 13, 2019 - 7:51:38 PM
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Owen

Canada

4661 posts since 6/5/2011

Nope, Bubba, I hadn't heard of either the Prairie Meteorite search, or the dude in the Whiteshell.  As a kid, we got our fill of picking rocks [by hand onto a trailer, and then tossed off by hand onto "the rock pile*"], although our area wasn't considered stoney land, not by a long shot.  By the time I got to farming on my own, I had a "rock picker," so it was a relatively easy couple of afternoons.   I'm not aware of us or any of our neighbours having come across any meteorites.   [Edit: One of our neighbours would regularly refer to rock picking as "...going out to pick watermelons."]

I checked a couple of hours ago, and it was nice and clear, although the sky wasn't particularly dark [i.e. stars still "coming out"].   Checked again just now and it's so cloudy the moon is a fuzzy blob.   Will check again before bedtime.

* = and at the time I hadn't heard of "Gotta Do My Time," although I doubt it would have made the job any more palatable.  sad

Edited by - Owen on 12/13/2019 19:58:37

Dec 14, 2019 - 8:00 AM
Players Union Member

DC5

USA

8663 posts since 6/30/2015

quote:
Originally posted by Helix

DC5 It turns out when they were excavating Meteor crater, they went straight down. A meteor coming in at an angle also leaves a round hole, they proved it with a Winchester, so they began to excavate at an angle and that's where they found the nickel core, it's still there,but they had run out of money at that time. The displaced mantle is all over the place.


Hmmmm, that's not what our tour guide said when I was out there.   Road Trip!

Dec 14, 2019 - 3:57:35 PM
Players Union Member

Helix

USA

12135 posts since 8/30/2006

The photos of them with the Winchester are in the museum.

Dec 16, 2019 - 3:58 AM
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tmercks

USA

738 posts since 3/7/2006

NASA has a site you can watch live. Actually, there are meteor showers almost every month, but none like those from August thru December. The problem for me this year in trying to show my grandson, is that we have had rainy or cloudy weather at their peaks all fall this year in my area. It's nice to see live online, but nothing like watching from your own back yard when possible. If I had a clear night, I would drive up to the Foothills Parkway in Tennessee, just a few miles away. Being elevated over all the surrounding area over darker skies is always great for watching meteors.

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