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Dec 6, 2019 - 8:01:04 AM
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70681 posts since 5/9/2007

It was,I believe 1979 and I was living in Lincoln R.I.
While reading a Boston Globe I found a Bill Keith/Jim Rooney concert in the Entertainment section.They were playing that very afternoon at the Brockton Performing Arts Center.

We called a music loving pair of friends and all decided to go see them.
When we got there it was only about 20 minutes 'til showtime,line outside the front door and already a full house standing all around the inside walls.

We were worried that the capacity limit was going to make us hang around outside in hopes of hearing what we could.

As our turn came to wait at the doorway we were approached by the well-dressed usher.
He asked,"Four?" and we meekly nodded our heads thinking we'd probably get split up where he said,"Follow me,please."

We lined up behind said usher and walked down the aisle,all the way to the front row.
He stood in front of the first row of "pews" and indicated a four person space in the seat.
"Mister Rooney's parents and friends couldn't be with us today...please accept their places."

Around 5-10 minutes later out steps Bill,Jim,the bass player with the straight sided flat hat and Peter Rowan...about 10-15 feet in front of us.

We could hardly believe what had just occurred.

Dec 6, 2019 - 8:06:45 AM
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1056 posts since 4/22/2018

You jammy sod (that’s a good/nice thing). Stuff like that never happens to me......if I fell in a bucket of boobs, I’d come out sucking my thumb!

Dec 6, 2019 - 8:30:57 AM
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figmo59

USA

29760 posts since 3/5/2008

Best post i seen in ah while..Mr. Spaniel... :0)

Dec 6, 2019 - 8:32:09 AM
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figmo59

USA

29760 posts since 3/5/2008

Oh.. n what ah memory you have to cherish Steve... :0)

Dec 6, 2019 - 8:39:30 AM
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3014 posts since 7/8/2010

Steve, what a precious memory. You definitely fell into that aforementioned bucket.

Dec 6, 2019 - 8:44:04 AM
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raybob

USA

13440 posts since 12/11/2003

I went to a Jackson Browne benefit show once where John Sebastian was also playing. David Lindley was playing with Jackson, and John was solo, no bands behind them. Personally I love seeing performances like this where the music is as close to the root as you can get. Anyway, I was visiting a friend in South Carolina and didn't have tickets to the show. We drove into Columbia the afternoon of the show to see about tickets. I went up to the box office of the auditorium and asked about a pair of tickets, and the person in the booth told me they just had some tickets returned by the promoter, and would I be interested ? I couldn't believe it. Instead of sitting in the nosebleed I was 4th row center. And I bought two tickets... so my friend's girlfriend called one of her friends and I also got a companion for the evening. She was a very nice lady studying art at the university there where the concert was. I completely lucked into the whole thing. And the show was great!

Dec 6, 2019 - 8:52:31 AM

3014 posts since 7/8/2010

Dec 5, 2016 a premiere event was held in my small town. It was to sponsor by the county board of disabilities. The show featured Shawn Camp and Lauren Mascitti. I bought a ticket which included a meet and greet event. What gracious people Shawn and Lauren were. Shawn showed me his Tony Rice guitar and let me have a picture taken with them. They had guitars and I had my banjo. Great show. Good cause and a memory to last me a lifetime

Dec 6, 2019 - 9:00:57 AM
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1056 posts since 4/22/2018

My wife and I went to see Beth Nielsen Chapman at a fairly small venue. After the show she came out to sign CDs and talk to people. For middle aged folks there was lots of argy bargy to get to her. She happened to be stood close to the disabled access lift. My wife I\uses a wheelchair and we were heading that way to get out of the place, but it was chaos. Beth spotted her, and put two and two together. She cleared the crowd with a couple of words and then took a good long time to chat to my wife and then called the lift for her - much to the chargrin of one guy who was virtually climbing over my wife’s chair to get to her. Lovely woman.

Edited by - Wet Spaniel on 12/06/2019 09:01:15

Dec 6, 2019 - 11:00:40 AM

130 posts since 8/25/2009

Around 1990, I happened to look at the local library newsletter in McLean Virginia, one of the suburbs of Washington D.C. and noticed that there was going to be a show called "Masters of the Banjo, a national tour of banjo styles" in the local library auditorium. I no longer remember whether it was absolutely free, or just cheap, but I do remember that the lead off player was Seleshe Damessae a native of Africa, who played songs of his people and the finale was the first time I ever heard Will Keys (my all-time favorite banjo player), followed by Dr. Ralph Stanley's bluegrass group. Damessae told the audience that his people were horseback riders,who played their instruments to pass the time on long trips, and even though I have never ridden a horse I could sense the horses' gait in the rhythm of his banjo! When the concert ended, I loped out to the lobby to make sure I got a copy of Will Keys' cassette, before they sold out.

A few weeks later when the show came back to downtown Washington D.C. in a large auditorium, both Damessae and Will Keys were missing. I have always wondered whether Dr. Ralph got annoyed by being upstaged by a little guy in a brown derby and red suspenders (Keys). Unfortunately the album does not have Damessae's pieces with the rhythm of the horses' gait, but I still remember enjoying them. In later years. I did get to hear Will Keys at the Smithsonian Festival of American Folklife, on the Mall in D.C.

When Will got out of the Marine Corps at the end of WWII, he bought a very nice Paramount plectrum banjo and added a fifth string tuner and pip.

Dec 6, 2019 - 12:59:47 PM
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9188 posts since 2/22/2007

My "lucky seats" story---in 1976 went with a friend to see Deep Purple, still in the age of general admission rock shows where people lined up early to get in first. We were not early and there was a huge line around the block. We walked up to the doors to peer through the glass, I'm still not sure why, but the security cop saw us and in a case of mistaken identity yelled "I told you to stay in line!" and pushed us right into the front of the line, and RIGHT THEN, before the legitimate front-of-liners could protest, they opened the doors and we found ourselves at the front of the mob making a mad dash for front row, which we attained. If we had tripped we would have been crushed!

Dec 6, 2019 - 1:11:46 PM
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2183 posts since 7/20/2004

Not exactly a lucky seats story, but when we first started going to Merlefest back in the early 90s, most folks were trying to get good seats for the main stage. We discovered we could get much better seats, usually in the front row, at the Old Time Herald stage, 15' from the performers. One day we wound up seated next to Rosa Watson, Doc's wife.

Dec 7, 2019 - 12:22:59 PM

130 posts since 8/25/2009

Around 1990, I happened to look at the local library newsletter in McLean Virginia, one of the suburbs of Washington D.C. and noticed that there was going to be a show called "Masters of the Banjo, a national tour of banjo styles" in the local library auditorium. I no longer remember whether it was absolutely free, or just cheap, but I do remember that the lead off player was Seleshe Damessae a native of Africa, who played songs of his people, followed by 4-5 frailers (Laurie Lewis accompanied one of them on fiddle, while doing a jig) and the finale was the first time I ever heard Will Keys (my all-time favorite banjo player), followed by Ralph Stanley's bluegrass group.

After a few pieces, Damessae told the audience that his people were horseback riders,who played their instruments to pass the time on long trips, then played a couple, and even though I have never ridden a horse I could sense the horses' gait in the rhythm of his banjo! When the concert ended, I loped out to the lobby to make sure I got a copy of Will Keys' cassette, before they sold out.

A few weeks later, when the show came back to downtown Washington D.C. in a large auditorium, both Damessae and Will Keys were missing from the newspaper advertisement. Since it was a cold, rainy night and parking around G.W. University is always dodgy, I decided to stay home. I have always wondered whether Dr. Ralph got annoyed by being upstaged by a little guy in a brown derby and red suspenders (Keys). When an album was released, unfortunately it did not have Damessae's pieces with the rhythm of the horses' gait, but I still remember enjoying them. In later years. I did get to hear Will Keys several times at the Smithsonian Festival of American Folklife, on the Mall in D.C, and I still treasure his "Evergreen" cassette..

When Will got out of the Marine Corps at the end of WWII, he bought a very nice Paramount plectrum banjo and added a fifth string tuner and pip. He really wanted to play banjo his way!

Dec 7, 2019 - 3:53:44 PM
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oly

USA

1386 posts since 5/27/2006

Greeting and marshalling airplanes to parking spots, I've gotten to meet The Greatful Dead, Charlie Pride, Dan Thompson( the Illinoise govenor) and numerous other dignataries. The best one I know of came from my dad. He and his brothers had gone to see the Marx Brothers at a local theator near Chicago. After the show, they went out to have dinner, as they were sitting at their booth, all of a sudden some food come flying over from the neighboring booth and hitting one of the brothers. My dad (also John) and his two brothers (Don and Jim) got up to teach some manners to whoever was throwing the food. As they came around the side of the booth, there sat Harpo, Groucho, and the other brother (who's name escapes me) having their very own food fight.

Dec 7, 2019 - 11:36:37 PM

Paul R

Canada

12035 posts since 1/28/2010

The Mariposa Folk Festival, 1972. I was running the information centre. On the boat on the way over to the Toronto Islands I overheard a board member asking another, "What should we do about the lady?" I realized she meant Joni Mitchell. I also had been on another boat and realized that the guy sitting across from me, who looked like a hippie garage mechanic, was Neil Young.

I figured that Murray McLauchlan would most likely give half of his hour set over to Joni. I figured right. My staff badge got me right behind the platform stage. I could have reached out and touched Joni when she played the electric piano. I was standing beside Jackson Browne.

Since Murray and Bruce Cockburn had the same manager, it seemed logical that Bruce would give half his set to Neil. I was right again.

Plus, back at the hotel I had fried chicken with John Prine. We talked about Steve Goodman's guitar playing.

Here in Kingston there's a series of concerts called Live Wire. You can chat with the musicians after the show, get them to sign CD's, and such. I was able to arrange a sound check photo shoot with John Sebastian, and, just lately, to talk with Claire Lynch.

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