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[FF] How Much Chili, In Your Chili?

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Nov 17, 2019 - 6:12:13 AM
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rinemb

USA

11679 posts since 5/24/2005

I am considering hacking a soup recipe to make a batch of chili. Reason for this, is to come up with a more unique version to the other many other chili pots that will be at the event. Chili powder, etc is the one ingredient nearly all agree is the ingredient that must be included to call it chili. So, how much chili powder do you add to your chili? Do you base it on how much liquid, how much meat, or how much heat you desire??? I will want a fairly mild spicing.

Brad

Nov 17, 2019 - 6:14 AM
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Owen

Canada

4347 posts since 6/5/2011
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...do it like tightening a banjo head.... add 'til it's too hot and then back off a bit.  cheeky

Edited by - Owen on 11/17/2019 06:19:05

Nov 17, 2019 - 6:30:21 AM
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DC5

USA

7810 posts since 6/30/2015
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Can't say I've ever measured. Kind of like what Owen said, except I add a touch more rather than backing off.

Nov 17, 2019 - 6:57:49 AM
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rinemb

USA

11679 posts since 5/24/2005

Sorry guys...that is what I am avoiding. I want to enough to be noticed, but not enough to be hot. This one's gotta be mild-I will be using the "mild" word in the description. I will put some Slap Ya Mama, or similar weapons I have in the pantry out on the table for those that want to fire it up. Brad  (But I did ask how much chili in YOUR chili, didn't I)

Edited by - rinemb on 11/17/2019 06:59:56

Nov 17, 2019 - 7:28:50 AM
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215 posts since 10/9/2017

There are chilis that are more flavor than heat. I'm particularly fond of toasted ancho chilis in my chili. Here's a reference

fivethirtyeight.com/features/r...-on-fire/

I'd avoid the Carolina Reaper.

Nov 17, 2019 - 7:38:05 AM

Owen

Canada

4347 posts since 6/5/2011
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Well, Brad, MY chili is actually my WIFE'S chili.... so I asked her.  "Well, I dunno...I just kinda look at the pot and put some in."  

So there you have it!   

[FWIW, I like mine on the mild side, but should I find it too mild, I just add  a few shakes of powder from the can to my bowl, and repeat as necessary. KISS.]

Edited by - Owen on 11/17/2019 07:44:49

Nov 17, 2019 - 7:49:12 AM

14396 posts since 12/2/2005

I tend not to use chili powder, which is actually a spice blend consisting of ground dried chiles, paprika, cumin, Mexican oregano and a few other ingredients (including anti-caking chemicals) depending to the brand.

I typically start by rehydrating dried whole red chiles (usually a mix of NuMex and guajillo, which is actually a ripened and dried poblano) by covering them with boiling water, pureeing with the liquid and straining them. This produces a liquid paste that ends up with a viscosity similar to A1 steak sauce. I add the other spices individually from there. If you use this approach you can test it for heat prior to cooking anything in it; you can back off on the amount of chile puree and freeze the rest. Not that I would, of course.

Nov 17, 2019 - 7:49:21 AM

Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

23449 posts since 8/3/2003
Online Now

We used to cook competition chili at CASI and the judges LOVED the spice of chili powder (not hot, spicy). We usually put in 1 heaping tablespoon of chili powder per pound of meat. We also purchased a specific chili powder that was way superior to what you buy in the store.

However, if you're making homemade chili, you may not want that much spice in it. Judges just got one taste and it had to be excellent or you'd lose out. Homemade chili, on the other hand you want to have a big bowl full, so you might not want that much spice. Maybe a teaspoon per pound or..... as has already been said.... add chili powder until you like the taste.

I also add beans to my homemade chili and that was an automatic disqualifier at CASI.

Nov 17, 2019 - 7:58:56 AM

raybob

USA

13416 posts since 12/11/2003

I use 1 tablespoon of Hot New Mexico and a generous teaspoon of Chili de Arbol. This is a batch made with about 2.25 lbs of tri-tip or chuck roast. Enough for 2-3 people with some leftover.

I cube the meat then sear it in the pot in EVOO. A bit before the meat is done I toss in the spices, including the chili powders, to cook them before the liquids start going in. It’s a long simmer, and it’s done when I taste a piece of meat and it falls apart in my mouth.

It comes out medium hot. People can always add more heat at the table if they like. 

Edit:  I used to use Mohave powders until they went out of business. Now I do the best I can. 

Edited by - raybob on 11/17/2019 08:02:10

Nov 17, 2019 - 11:41:17 AM

2670 posts since 7/28/2015

Use medium hatch green chiles - Big Jims. They can basically be eaten straight without killing you and have more flavor than kick. Ideally you'd have gotten them roasted from your supermarket in September and have some still frozen. Barring that, canned or jarred is okay. I wouldn't be afraid to put a whole cup or so in a pot of chili, but then I live here.

Nov 17, 2019 - 12:05:23 PM
Players Union Member

rinemb

USA

11679 posts since 5/24/2005

quote:
Originally posted by prooftheory

Use medium hatch green chiles - Big Jims. They can basically be eaten straight without killing you and have more flavor than kick. Ideally you'd have gotten them roasted from your supermarket in September and have some still frozen. Barring that, canned or jarred is okay. I wouldn't be afraid to put a whole cup or so in a pot of chili, but then I live here.


Spoken like good New Mexican Homer.  It was living where you live that took the heat out of me.  Too many times, Manning up against other jocks to see how much heat we could injest.   I ended up in the hospital.  Took the fire out of me ever since.   I do like roasted hatches though.  Buy em every year at our local lawn and garden store from the roaster that comes through.  Brad

Nov 17, 2019 - 12:08:14 PM
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rinemb

USA

11679 posts since 5/24/2005

I will not be entering a contest, just a community fund raiser event. So I am free to do as I please.
Other than I do want to please. The only thing bad is going home with most of your chili. Brad

Nov 17, 2019 - 1:15:13 PM
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Brian T

Canada

15826 posts since 6/5/2008

Let's see if copy and paste work with this.
The biggest risk is to over-do the chili powder.
Just about impossible to repair.


4.10 PG FOREST SERVICE CHILI The Forest Service office in Prince George held a chili cook-off. This winner appeared in the paper. To be correct, this really is chili with beans and really better than that all that I’ve tried. My guess is that it’s the vinegar and cumin make it taste right.
ORIGINAL RECIPE: WHAT I DO:
1 lb ground beef........................3 lb
1 onion (chopped).......................2 3
1 stalk celery..........................3 stalks
1 green pepper (chopped)................3
2 28 oz cans red kidney beans
(drained)..........................4 X 24 oz, or so
1 14 oz tin tomatoes....................2 3 cans
1 5 oz tin tomato paste.................3 tins
1 cup water.............................don't bother
1 can tomato soup.......................3 cans
2 TBS chili powder......................4 5 TBS
1 TBS ground cumin......................2 3 TBS
1 TBS sugar.............................3 TBS
2 TBS vinegar...........................6 TBS
1 level tsp mustard powder..............2 3 tsp
1/2 tsp salt............................1 1/2 tsp
1/4 tsp ground black pepper.............3/4 tsp
Baked beans. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 cans
Kernel corn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4 cans

Brown the beef on high heat until really well cooked.
Add onion, celery & green peppers, cook until
onions soften & start to go transparent.
Drain fat, lower temperature.
Open all cans, add everything.
Stir and simmer over low medium heat for an hour.

Nov 17, 2019 - 3:07:20 PM
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9073 posts since 1/15/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Brian T

Let's see if copy and paste work with this.
The biggest risk is to over-do the chili powder.
Just about impossible to repair.


4.10 PG FOREST SERVICE CHILI The Forest Service office in Prince George held a chili cook-off. This winner appeared in the paper. To be correct, this really is chili with beans and really better than that all that I’ve tried. My guess is that it’s the vinegar and cumin make it taste right.
ORIGINAL RECIPE: WHAT I DO:
1 lb ground beef........................3 lb
1 onion (chopped).......................2 3
1 stalk celery..........................3 stalks
1 green pepper (chopped)................3
2 28 oz cans red kidney beans
(drained)..........................4 X 24 oz, or so
1 14 oz tin tomatoes....................2 3 cans
1 5 oz tin tomato paste.................3 tins
1 cup water.............................don't bother
1 can tomato soup.......................3 cans
2 TBS chili powder......................4 5 TBS
1 TBS ground cumin......................2 3 TBS
1 TBS sugar.............................3 TBS
2 TBS vinegar...........................6 TBS
1 level tsp mustard powder..............2 3 tsp
1/2 tsp salt............................1 1/2 tsp
1/4 tsp ground black pepper.............3/4 tsp
Baked beans. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 cans
Kernel corn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4 cans

Brown the beef on high heat until really well cooked.
Add onion, celery & green peppers, cook until
onions soften & start to go transparent.
Drain fat, lower temperature.
Open all cans, add everything.
Stir and simmer over low medium heat for an hour.


I really like this recipe, but I would leave out the corn and baked beans.  I am sure it would still be good with it, but with the Kidney beans, I don't think you would need the baked beans.  My mouth is starting to water now!  Wew usually put a bowl or sour cream, shredded cheese and, and chopped onion in a bowl in case someone wants them.  I usually use the sour cream and cheese.

Nov 17, 2019 - 3:42:53 PM
Players Union Member

Brian T

Canada

15826 posts since 6/5/2008

I think it can be modified any old which way you please.
The corn and the green peppers add color. Mexicans are corn-walking.
Remember this was a competition-winning recipe.
The original quantities are on the left, my scale-up on the right makes a dozen servings to freeze.

So you get a big bag of good corn tortilla chips.
Leave out the baked beans.
Slice the green peppers lengthwise and clean.
Add lots of smashed tortilla chips to the chili, load the green pepper shells and bake.

Nov 17, 2019 - 4:07:35 PM

oly

USA

1380 posts since 5/27/2006

I don't have a recipie. I will use store bought chile seasoning, one pack per lb of burger, one can of Rotel tomatoe's with green chiles, one can of diced green chiles, and a small can of spicy V-8. I also add onion, salt and pepper. A 14 oz, can of kidney beans, (drained) and a 14 oz can of black beans(drained). You can add Tobasco (green or red) as needed. Of course you add or subtract as needed to any of the ingredients.  ( of course this is all secret, don't tell anyone)

Edited by - oly on 11/17/2019 16:09:57

Nov 17, 2019 - 10:22:58 PM

Paul R

Canada

11825 posts since 1/28/2010

Just FYI, my buddy Hal (from Lubbock, Texas) chimed in some time ago about beans in chili:

How’d Paul; well, I’ll tell ya … as a native Texan and whose family hails from somewhere between Texas, Oklahoma, and Arkansas, via Virginia (and somewhere in Ireland, England, and Germany – I need the DNA test to pinpoint); and, as someone who has won 2nd Place in a chili cook-off at St. Mary’s University in San Antonio …

Any chili from Texas can have beans in it, but traditional Texas chili does not have beans! The basic ingredients in Texas chili are meat (usually beef, but could be anything) and spices (chili peppers being the primary). My particular Texas chili (secrete recipe, make from scratch [yes, I do a lot of that too]) I call High Plains Texas Chili and DOES NOT have beans.

Guess in the long run, beans don’t amount to a hill of them when it comes to Texas chili. However, a good bowl of beans (prefer pinto) with onions and green pepper sauce is always good – especially with pan-fried cornbread. Or, rice and beans (usually black) is nice too.

Now I’m hungry and gonna go fix my supper now – Texas style baked ziti (just add Tabasco [I know, that’s Louisiana] and wash down with a Texas beer [well, maybe an ON craft brew this time]). Yee haw! Hal

Nov 18, 2019 - 2:12:43 PM
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Mooooo

USA

7185 posts since 8/20/2016

My recipe calls for 2TBS chili powder and 1 Red Hot Chili Pepper, de-seeded per pound of meat. But the ingredient that sets this off is the dark beer - 1/2 cup per pound of meat. Good luck with your chili.

Nov 18, 2019 - 5:10:49 PM

figmo59

USA

29518 posts since 3/5/2008

Liz has made...
Hemeroid Hollowcost.....

Nov 18, 2019 - 7:20:02 PM

14846 posts since 2/7/2003

I do as Skip aid, if Im making chile thats worth the effort I NEVER use chile powder. I keep on hand dried chiles and can creat endless versions by varying the types and quantities

Important chiles to havew on hand

Ancho, the workhorse chile
Cascabel, unique flavor and heat
New Mexico, again unique flavor and adds volume and richness to the chile
Chipotle, ebough said. I make my own

There are more but I cant make chile without these

Scott

Nov 19, 2019 - 6:28:06 AM
Players Union Member

rinemb

USA

11679 posts since 5/24/2005

I plan to turn an Eastern Euro soup into a chili. I want to present a unique chili that the event. But I still want it to taste good, even if some folks pronounce "That ain't chili, son!" I figure, as long as its fairly thick, got meat in it and beans and chili spice....ITS CHILI,eh.

The other flavoring will be "Vegeta." My meat will either be chopped smoked beef rib meat, with beef sausage, or chopped smoked hocks and smoked kielbasa. Beans likely cranberry beans and/or similar.

MILD...a lot of folks show up at these chili fundraiser events around here, and don't like much heat and are not fans of more typical chili.

I like the thought of pulverizing peppers instead of using  jarred straight chili powder.  I will have to think about that.

Brad

Edited by - rinemb on 11/19/2019 06:29:35

Nov 19, 2019 - 7:13:11 AM
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14846 posts since 2/7/2003

Ancho, dried anchos are usually available in many supermarkets, its the chile base of... chile and not too hot. Add it to any soup and it becomes a rich chile. If you can get the dried ones, soak them in warm water until they soften then put them in the blender with some of the soaking water to creat a paste

Scott

Nov 19, 2019 - 11:40:11 AM
Players Union Member

Brian T

Canada

15826 posts since 6/5/2008

I like savory, not hot. In the decades that I worked, I needed hot food that I could produce at any time when I got home, whether it was 4PM or 11PM. That Forest Service Chili is typical of the recipes that I made up to freeze. I used one particular brand of chili powder for its predictability.

Big batch, two big pots, stir constantly so the bottom doesn't burn ( it will, every time if left to stagnate on the stove.)

I know the recipe isn't exactly what Brad was looking for but with all the other stuff, I couldn't figure out how to explain how much chili powder I used.

Nov 19, 2019 - 12:55:14 PM

2670 posts since 7/28/2015

quote:
Originally posted by Paul R

Just FYI, my buddy Hal (from Lubbock, Texas) chimed in some time ago about beans in chili:

How’d Paul; well, I’ll tell ya … as a native Texan and whose family hails from somewhere between Texas, Oklahoma, and Arkansas, via Virginia (and somewhere in Ireland, England, and Germany – I need the DNA test to pinpoint); and, as someone who has won 2nd Place in a chili cook-off at St. Mary’s University in San Antonio …

Any chili from Texas can have beans in it, but traditional Texas chili does not have beans! The basic ingredients in Texas chili are meat (usually beef, but could be anything) and spices (chili peppers being the primary). My particular Texas chili (secrete recipe, make from scratch [yes, I do a lot of that too]) I call High Plains Texas Chili and DOES NOT have beans.

Guess in the long run, beans don’t amount to a hill of them when it comes to Texas chili. However, a good bowl of beans (prefer pinto) with onions and green pepper sauce is always good – especially with pan-fried cornbread. Or, rice and beans (usually black) is nice too.

Now I’m hungry and gonna go fix my supper now – Texas style baked ziti (just add Tabasco [I know, that’s Louisiana] and wash down with a Texas beer [well, maybe an ON craft brew this time]). Yee haw! Hal


This is a linguistic issue rather than a food issue.  There are two dishes that have similar flavoring - chile con carne and chuckwagon beans.   For most of the country the word "chili" refers to chuckwagon beans, so when someone says "Real Texas chili has no beans" that makes about as much sense as "Real Texas chuckwagon beans has no beans".   Why people started using the word "chili" to refer to chuckwagon beans in most of the country is an interesting question but chuckwagon beans is a traditional food in Texas and they actually know how to make it so it is always weird when Texans or "chili" experts say that "chili should have no beans" when what they mean is "chile con carne should have no beans" - a sentence that would be understood and agreed with almost everywhere.  

Nov 19, 2019 - 1:54:43 PM
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rinemb

USA

11679 posts since 5/24/2005

quote:
Originally posted by desert rose

Ancho, dried anchos are usually available in many supermarkets, its the chile base of... chile and not too hot. Add it to any soup and it becomes a rich chile. If you can get the dried ones, soak them in warm water until they soften then put them in the blender with some of the soaking water to creat a paste

Scott


Thank you, for the suggestion.  Brad

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