Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

1157
Banjo Lovers Online


Want to hide these Google ads? Join the Players Union!
Nov 14, 2019 - 2:58:51 AM
293 posts since 10/3/2006

Hey can anybody tell me what the angle is between the fretboard and the end of the neck that attaches to the pot? I'm making my own neck and the wood is cut at a 90° angle but from what I can see the neck needs to be at a slight angle with regard to the pot, like about 86° I'd guess, but I'd like to get it right. I can't find a schematic drawing that has the angle written. Thanks!

Nov 14, 2019 - 5:20:05 AM
likes this

1513 posts since 10/12/2011

The neck heal should be about 3 degree.

Nov 14, 2019 - 5:44:29 AM

3667 posts since 5/12/2010

As already said the angle plane of head to the plane of the fretboard is usually cut at about 3 degrees of lean, sometimes a little less. I cut mine at about 2 degrees but my banjos are clawhammer specific, and a slighter angle works for the action I want.

The way you must be measuring, front of heel to fretboard, to come up with 86 degrees would translate to 87 degrees to get that 3 degree tilt.

A lot of the cheaper Asian imports have a "flat cut" heel with no angle.

This is a compound angle as the neck of a 5 string has to be rotated clockwise to align the 3rd string as center line else the stings will not be properly aligned on the board.

Nov 14, 2019 - 6:10:45 AM
like this

12466 posts since 6/29/2005

I use the same angles as Andy has mentioned—Here's a drawing showing the angles for scooped and unscooped necks that might help visualize what's happening—you can round up the 2.9 degrees to 3 degrees

Nov 14, 2019 - 12:20:30 PM
Players Union Member

rudy

USA

14808 posts since 3/27/2004

Neck heel angle requires a bit more than throwing you out a number.  Here's information I recently posted on calculating heel angle correctly.

https://www.banjohangout.org/topic/356683

Nov 14, 2019 - 1:44:46 PM

70656 posts since 5/9/2007

I had Jimmy Cox cut mine a tad over 3* for a low action 11/16" bridge.

For the past year I've gone to a .650 bridge for a wicked low setting of .092/12th fret and .098/22nd fret.Very comfortable and strong tone.

I prefer the taller bridges because I have basket ball palming,long fingers.5/8 bridges feel way cramped for my hand.Sometimes I dream of having a 1" bridge.Going to have to shim one in place one of these days.It would have to be a huge improvement to ever recut this Cox neck.

Edited by - steve davis on 11/14/2019 13:54:41

Nov 14, 2019 - 2:39:59 PM
likes this

12466 posts since 6/29/2005

quote:
Originally posted by steve davis

I had Jimmy Cox cut mine a tad over 3* for a low action 11/16" bridge.

For the past year I've gone to a .650 bridge for a wicked low setting of .092/12th fret and .098/22nd fret.Very comfortable and strong tone.

I prefer the taller bridges because I have basket ball palming,long fingers.5/8 bridges feel way cramped for my hand.Sometimes I dream of having a 1" bridge.Going to have to shim one in place one of these days.It would have to be a huge improvement to ever recut this Cox neck.


I'm on your page Steve, I like tall bridges and low action.

Nov 15, 2019 - 4:02:41 AM

439 posts since 4/13/2011

quote:
Originally posted by Ken LeVan

I use the same angles as Andy has mentioned—Here's a drawing showing the angles for scooped and unscooped necks that might help visualize what's happening—you can round up the 2.9 degrees to 3 degrees


Ken, I'm having a hard time understanding how scooping the end of the fretboard impact the action at the 12 fret. I'm not doubting you, I'm just seeking more explanation. Hypothetically, if you took the fretboard off the banjo in the diagram with a 3° heel cut, scooped the fretboard, then reinstalled it on the neck - how would that impact the string action at the 12th fret?

Nov 15, 2019 - 5:22:18 AM

12466 posts since 6/29/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Stephen45710
quote:
Originally posted by Ken LeVan

I use the same angles as Andy has mentioned—Here's a drawing showing the angles for scooped and unscooped necks that might help visualize what's happening—you can round up the 2.9 degrees to 3 degrees


Ken, I'm having a hard time understanding how scooping the end of the fretboard impact the action at the 12 fret. I'm not doubting you, I'm just seeking more explanation. Hypothetically, if you took the fretboard off the banjo in the diagram with a 3° heel cut, scooped the fretboard, then reinstalled it on the neck - how would that impact the string action at the 12th fret?


Look closely at the drawing which shows how it works. Scooping the fingerboard makes the fretted part of the fingerboard higher relative to the surface of the head because the scooped part, which is 1/8" lower is what lines up with the head surface as opposed to the fretted part.

Scooping the fingerboard has NO impact on the action at the 12th fret.  You position the neck so that you have the desired string action at the 12th (or any) fret and the desired bridge height.

With string action, bridge height as constants, the variable is the neck angle needed to maintain those in the face of a different level of the fingerboard that is connecting to the pot.

 

Here is a picture of an unscooped fingerbpoard and a scooped one.  In both cases, the bridge height is the same and the string action is the same.  The difference is the height of the strings off the head due to the different level of the fretted part of the fingerboard and the angle of the neck.

Nov 15, 2019 - 5:43:23 AM

439 posts since 4/13/2011

Ken, thank you. That helped me understand.

Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.171875