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Nov 13, 2019 - 12:28:57 PM
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539 posts since 9/10/2003

3 weeks ago we were down in Virginia, exploring the Shenandoah valley after attending our sons wedding. We stopped for lunch at Michie’s tavern right outside of Jefferson’s Monticello. After lunch as my wife was cleaning up I was chatting with the cashier.

Cashier: Y’all aren’t from around here, where are you from?
Me: Upstate N.Y.
C: Are you enjoying your trip?
Me: Quite nice. It’s a lot like upstate except you don’t get the cold and snow we do.

C: Oh we get snow! Last winter we had one day it snowed all day.....the snow was over my ankles! laugh?

Nov 13, 2019 - 12:30:21 PM
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mander

USA

3871 posts since 10/7/2007

Heavens! That must have been something to see! :-)

As a side note, Hubby and I also always clean up our table for the waitress. Don't know why, we just do.

Edited by - mander on 11/13/2019 12:31:42

Nov 13, 2019 - 12:32:17 PM
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chuckv97

Canada

44647 posts since 10/5/2013
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Ha... last winter in Arizona it went below 32* one night. My friend came in and said,”Wow! You should see your car ; it’s all covered in frost!”

Nov 13, 2019 - 1:14:14 PM
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Brian T

Canada

15834 posts since 6/5/2008

T-shirt:
"Visit Tuktoyaktuk for Christmas and freeze your a$$ off."

Nov 13, 2019 - 2:22:16 PM
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Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

23463 posts since 8/3/2003

Our weatherman did a little report last night on our wintertime weather. Last 7 years..... yes, 7 years, we've had less than 1" of snow all winter. Back in 2014 we had a total of 12 inches!!! That was a record. The only record even near it was 6" back in the '90s. That's the kind of winter I prefer: the one with less than an inch of snow.

We do, however, have frigid weather with temps in the 20s and howling wind but that seldom lasts more than a day or two and then it's back to the 60s and maybe 70s.

And when I go to a restaurant, I also clean the table, put the silverware and napkins in the plate and make it easy for the waitress to clean up.  I know why.  My youngest daughter was a waitress while she was in college and listening to her tales about how messy and nasty people were made an impression on me.

Edited by - Texasbanjo on 11/13/2019 14:24:30

Nov 13, 2019 - 2:36:23 PM

Paul R

Canada

11834 posts since 1/28/2010

Hoo boy, I'll bet everyone was hunkered down like Armageddon was here.

Nov 13, 2019 - 7:00:57 PM
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Chris Meakin

Australia

2501 posts since 5/15/2011

quote:
Originally posted by Brian T

T-shirt:
"Visit Tuktoyaktuk for Christmas and freeze your a$$ off."


A high school friend of mine in Darwin, Jan VanderHoek, her father was the headmaster at Tuktoyaktuk in the late 60s/early 70s. She loved growing up there, but from her stories and photos, it clearly was about as different to monsoonal tropical Darwin as you could get.

Nov 13, 2019 - 7:42:11 PM

dmiller

USA

23680 posts since 7/22/2007
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Up here in Duluth Minnesota, the "liberal genteel folk" who are in charge of school closings when a big storm is coming - - have been ordering school closings immediately the last 5 or so years now, from just a mere prediction of a possible storm headed our way.  This isn't a political statement about our local school governmental decisions concerning winter school closings - - it's a statement of fact.  I won't go the "I walked 5 miles to school uphill both ways" route - - but folks sure are getting wimpy these days when it comes to snow, and will shut down with nothing more than the weatherman's "prediction"

Nov 13, 2019 - 8:32:49 PM
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Brian T

Canada

15834 posts since 6/5/2008

She loved growing up there, but from her stories and photos, it clearly was about as different to monsoonal tropical Darwin as you could get.

There's finally an all weather highway into Tuk.
It's changed everything from construction to food and tourism.

Nov 13, 2019 - 9:43:13 PM
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Tommy5

USA

3434 posts since 2/22/2009

quote:
Originally posted by dmiller

Up here in Duluth Minnesota, the "liberal genteel folk" who are in charge of school closings when a big storm is coming - - have been ordering school closings immediately the last 5 or so years now, from just a mere prediction of a possible storm headed our way.  This isn't a political statement about our local school governmental decisions concerning winter school closings - - it's a statement of fact.  I won't go the "I walked 5 miles to school uphill both ways" route - - but folks sure are getting wimpy these days when it comes to snow, and will shut down with nothing more than the weatherman's "prediction"


It's not about being tough or wimpy or political considerations. It's about legal liability. Today weather forecast while not always accurate are much better then they used to be. Also more parents work as opposed to the old days. Timing is everything, if the school superintendents wait  till morning to see  if the snow flies, parents will have a difficult time finding someone to watch their kids  on short notice or will have to take off work themselves. It's not so much the depth of the snow as it is the winds ,blowing, whiteout hazardous conditions. If the weather bureau issued a winter storm warning and the schools  ignore it and stay open anyway, they could face legal jeopardy if some kid gets hurt coming to school, and it looks bad in the papers.Schools have built in snow days , an extra day of school in June is a small, price to pay for saving  a youngster from being killed by a skidding ,sliding auto.

Nov 13, 2019 - 11:07:39 PM

dmiller

USA

23680 posts since 7/22/2007
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by Tommy quote:

It's not about being tough or wimpy or political considerations. It's about legal liability. Today weather forecast while not always accurate are much better then they used to be. Also more parents work as opposed to the old days. Timing is everything, if the school superintendents wait  till morning to see  if the snow flies, parents will have a difficult time finding someone to watch their kids  on short notice or will have to take off work themselves. It's not so much the depth of the snow as it is the winds ,blowing, whiteout hazardous conditions. If the weather bureau issued a winter storm warning and the schools  ignore it and stay open anyway, they could face legal jeopardy if some kid gets hurt coming to school, and it looks bad in the papers.Schools have built in snow days , an extra day of school in June is a small, price to pay for saving  a youngster from being killed by a skidding ,sliding auto.


Edited by - dmiller on 11/13/2019 23:22:11

Nov 13, 2019 - 11:54:26 PM

Paul R

Canada

11834 posts since 1/28/2010

quote:
Originally posted by Tommy5
quote:
Originally posted by dmiller

Up here in Duluth Minnesota, the "liberal genteel folk" who are in charge of school closings when a big storm is coming - - have been ordering school closings immediately the last 5 or so years now, from just a mere prediction of a possible storm headed our way.  This isn't a political statement about our local school governmental decisions concerning winter school closings - - it's a statement of fact.  I won't go the "I walked 5 miles to school uphill both ways" route - - but folks sure are getting wimpy these days when it comes to snow, and will shut down with nothing more than the weatherman's "prediction"


It's not about being tough or wimpy or political considerations. It's about legal liability. Today weather forecast while not always accurate are much better then they used to be. Also more parents work as opposed to the old days. Timing is everything, if the school superintendents wait  till morning to see  if the snow flies, parents will have a difficult time finding someone to watch their kids  on short notice or will have to take off work themselves. It's not so much the depth of the snow as it is the winds ,blowing, whiteout hazardous conditions. If the weather bureau issued a winter storm warning and the schools  ignore it and stay open anyway, they could face legal jeopardy if some kid gets hurt coming to school, and it looks bad in the papers.Schools have built in snow days , an extra day of school in June is a small, price to pay for saving  a youngster from being killed by a skidding ,sliding auto.


We used to have to come in to school during blizzards (for me it was a combination of subway and bus). Then we'd take attendance and have the students phone home (from the office - they didn't carry cell phones yet). The few who couldn't contact parents/guardians would stay. Administrators (principal, vice principals) would supervise them in the gym and we would be given the rest of the day off - and head back into the blizzard to make our way home..

One time, when I took attendance, the whole class got a laugh because one of the students who didn't show up ... lived across the street from the school.

Another time, we were scheduled to go downtown to see the National Ballet of Canada. We took transit (bus and subway). In a raging blizzard, we emerged from the subway onto Front street to see - a bicycle courier. When we got to the hall, it must have been less than half full. The suburban school boards had closed their schools in advance. We had balcony seats, but, during intermission, came down to the better seats nearer the stage.

I don't recall ever having a snow day declared until after I'd arrived at school. We were an urban school board. At that school, most of the kids walked to school.

Nov 14, 2019 - 3:04:38 AM
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OM45GE

USA

90574 posts since 11/7/2007

“...the snow was over my ankles!”

That’s a “dusting”

Edited by - OM45GE on 11/14/2019 03:05:18

Nov 14, 2019 - 4:17:19 AM
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3195 posts since 12/6/2009

I'm an old guy and when we was kids we walked to school in 15 feet of snow 20 miles both ways in our bare feet.....

Nov 14, 2019 - 8:50:50 AM

1352 posts since 2/10/2013

In regard to school closings. I was raised in the Adirondack Mountains in the northeastern part of New York State. In the winter temperatures dropped to -30's and moisture from Lake Ontario dumped very large amounts of snow. The central school system was never closed for weather conditions. Those big "Mac" buses were powerful and reliable.

That was back in the days when schools had truant officers. Anybody remember who they were ?

Nov 14, 2019 - 9:06:03 AM
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Brian T

Canada

15834 posts since 6/5/2008

Most we ever got here in one dump overnight was a measured 44" off the front edge of my doorstep. Search & Rescue, with the aid of the Snowmobile Club, were ready for anything.

The trail groomer got 2 of his Tucker SnoCats into town and us residents just waited it out.
The snow settled and got plowed and pushed and piled and life went on.
Took 48 hours but who can you complain to?

Nov 14, 2019 - 3:05:07 PM
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DRH

USA

85 posts since 5/29/2018

I moved from Idaho to upstate NY in 1989. We hit black ice in Ohio so I pulled into a motel parking lot, left the engine running, and told my wife not to get out. She is from Malaysia and had never seen black ice.

When I came out with the room key my wife was sprawled on the ground and was trying to reach the truck door. I tried to help but she was so scared she crawled 200 feet from the truck to the door of the motel.

To this day if the weatherman says anything about snow or ice she cancels all appointments and rolls back into bed.

Nov 14, 2019 - 3:25:45 PM
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RonR

USA

1544 posts since 11/29/2012
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I like cleaning up a couple of lots with my snow blower and going home to a grilled cheese and a bowl of tomato soup in front of the electric fire place,or the wood stove in the mancave.




Nov 14, 2019 - 3:32:19 PM
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donc

Canada

6087 posts since 2/9/2010

quote:
Originally posted by overhere

I'm an old guy and when we was kids we walked to school in 15 feet of snow 20 miles both ways in our bare feet.....


Don't forget to mention it was uphill both ways. 

Nov 14, 2019 - 3:34:34 PM

donc

Canada

6087 posts since 2/9/2010

My first year of school was 1953-54. We actually got 1 day off due to a snowfall. For the following 11 years it was no such luck.

Nov 14, 2019 - 5:57:03 PM

oly

USA

1382 posts since 5/27/2006

I remember only one (1) day off from school. We lived in Aurora Il. (about 40 miles from Chicago). The winter blizzard of "68-69".

Nov 14, 2019 - 7:10:53 PM
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Tommy5

USA

3434 posts since 2/22/2009

Yeah the good ole days, mothers smoked all through pregnancy, no seatbelts, drunk driving was just a joke, autos had no padded dashes, no collapsible steering columns, no airbags, playgrounds had metal swings , slides, monkey bars built on cement ,kids walked through blizzards to get to school, the death rate for children under 16 was double what it is today , sometimes things do get better over time.

Nov 14, 2019 - 8:38:25 PM
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Brian T

Canada

15834 posts since 6/5/2008

I can still recall a few days of elementary school called off because of sudden blizzards.
Panic-stricken parents (including mine) to collect us so we didn't get lost in the storms.
All the buildings on the farm were connected with ropes, not to be taken lightly.

Nov 15, 2019 - 7:23:59 AM
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1352 posts since 2/10/2013

Areas that get lots of snow and cold have the necessary equipment to handle snow on the highways, and the material to deal with ice. The areas in borderline areas (i.e. areas that normally don't receive snow/ice) have the most dangerous driving conditions. The get winter conditions, but can't do much to improve driving conditions.

Nov 15, 2019 - 1:16:52 PM

3195 posts since 12/6/2009

quote:
Originally posted by Richard Hauser

Areas that get lots of snow and cold have the necessary equipment to handle snow on the highways, and the material to deal with ice. The areas in borderline areas (i.e. areas that normally don't receive snow/ice) have the most dangerous driving conditions. The get winter conditions, but can't do much to improve driving conditions.


yep. years ago a friend moved from up here in North Jersey to Johnson City Tenn. The first year down there they got 2 inches....he said it crippled the city.

Nov 15, 2019 - 3:11:24 PM
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DRH

USA

85 posts since 5/29/2018

When I first moved down here the locals told me to stay off the roads if we get snow or ice. I told them I had been driving in it most of my life. They all had the same reply:

It ain't you - it's us!

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