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Nov 3, 2019 - 4:46:56 PM

howsy-bee

Thailand

978 posts since 8/16/2003

I recently moved to Thailand and noticed that all nickel-plated banjos here have heavily corroded parts - while chrome is not affected. This corrosion happens regardless of whether the instruments are kept on stands or in closed cases. Can this be prevented with some invisible coating like acrylic?

Edited by - howsy-bee on 11/03/2019 16:49:58

Nov 3, 2019 - 7:35:02 PM
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10850 posts since 4/15/2012

Camphor, man. Foe resisting corrosion on ferrous metals (iron, cobalt, nickle, steel, etc.), keep a chunk of cvamphor in the case. If you use mothballs, make sure that they're the okd-fashioned kind, made of real camphor. It sucks up yhe humidity in the air. I use it to protect my chisels, gouges and planes.

Nov 3, 2019 - 9:41:27 PM

howsy-bee

Thailand

978 posts since 8/16/2003

Thanks, will give it try!

Nov 4, 2019 - 4:41:43 AM
Players Union Member

rudy

USA

14627 posts since 3/27/2004
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by Meles_Meles

Camphor, man. Foe resisting corrosion on ferrous metals (iron, cobalt, nickle, steel, etc.), keep a chunk of cvamphor in the case. If you use mothballs, make sure that they're the okd-fashioned kind, made of real camphor. It sucks up yhe humidity in the air. I use it to protect my chisels, gouges and planes.


My father-in-law was a tool and guage maker and kept his fine tools in drawers lined with felt.  He added a single diaper pail deodorizer to the drawers to displace the oxygen to prevent fine rust from forming.  They used to be easy to find at any grocery store, but I don't know how widely available they are.  Moth balls are probably easier to find.

Nov 4, 2019 - 8:59:33 PM

10850 posts since 4/15/2012

Yeah, they're easier to find but nowadays most aren't made of camphor. I buy my camphor in 1" by 1" blocks about 1/4" thick. They come individually wrapped in cellophane, and I just make a 1/4" slit in a block's wrapper and toss it into the case loose; that way, it lasts about a year.

Nov 5, 2019 - 7:37:51 AM

wtalley

USA

230 posts since 7/2/2010

Dirt particles on metal attract moisture. As a result, a small voltage difference occurs between the dirt and the metal causing a galvanic reaction which, in turn, causes the corrosion. So...keep the metal parts clean (wiping down your instrument with a clean, dry cloth after every time you play it would be a good front line defense) and away from humidity. When not playing the banjo keep it in a case with either a dessicant or champhor, as suggested above. Air conditioning helps as well as a dehumidifier.

If you apply wax, make sure it is everywhere on the metal, otherwise corrison will still occur. If you use some kind of coating, again, it has to be everywhere to prevent corrision. If it gets nicked or scratched, corrision will occur.

Nov 5, 2019 - 7:45:57 AM

howsy-bee

Thailand

978 posts since 8/16/2003

Thanks everybody for your advice!

Nov 5, 2019 - 11:02:11 AM

6326 posts since 8/28/2013

That camphor trick is good to know. I'd never heard that tip before. Although I haven't really had any corrosion issues with tools or banjos, I'll be looking into this.

Nov 6, 2019 - 5:55:55 AM

1313 posts since 10/5/2006

For decades I have used narrow leather straps. On many hot gigs the straps would get wet with perspiration. I learned the hard way that if put back in the case wet and left that way, the evaporating moisture would apparently carry some acids from the leather tanning process thereby creating a corrosive atmosphere in a closed space.
On one occasion, the folded wet strap came in contact with the prewar flange causing severe corrosion.

Nov 6, 2019 - 11:56:29 AM

888 posts since 8/7/2017
Online Now

Seems to be a 2-sided problem: keep banjo dry to protect metal from corrosion, and keep banjo damp (45% humidity or so, per Taylor Guitars) to protect wood from shrinkage/cracking. I see wood shrinkage problems in dry Montana with my Indiana-built banjo if I don't keep the case humidified. And I've seen metal corrosion in my Stelling that lived in it's case for decades (I was not playing then), with no in-case humidifiers. The humidity of the storage room varied quite a bit over a year, w/o me realizing the implications for the stored banjo, sigh.

Renaissance Wax is a product used by museums to protect metal artifacts from corrosion. I've seen it (on youtube) used as finish for wood (solid wood electric guitars). I've held off using on my banjo's wood, though, since it has a solvent in it that may be hard to remove when refinishing the wood (I don't know, just am cautious). I've not used it on the Stelling metal either as I've not bought any yet (it is a little spendy). I have no interest in the company, just reporting some of what I've researched.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renaissance_Wax

Edited by - BrooksMT on 11/06/2019 11:58:44

Nov 6, 2019 - 2:22:29 PM

2364 posts since 4/16/2003

Thailand...???
What's the relative humidity there most of the time?

Near the ocean, too...???

You're gonna need chrome plating on everything...

Nov 6, 2019 - 4:29:47 PM

howsy-bee

Thailand

978 posts since 8/16/2003

quote:
Originally posted by J.Albert

Thailand...???
What's the relative humidity there most of the time?

Near the ocean, too...???

You're gonna need chrome plating on everything...


80 - 90%. Yes, near the ocean.


Nov 6, 2019 - 6:56:51 PM
Players Union Member

RioStat

USA

4997 posts since 10/12/2009

The picture above is just tarnished nickel plating.

Oldtwangers picture of the flange shows corrosion.

Nov 6, 2019 - 8:52:21 PM

howsy-bee

Thailand

978 posts since 8/16/2003

quote:
Originally posted by RioStat

The picture above is just tarnished nickel plating.

Oldtwangers picture of the flange shows corrosion.


Oh, then my wording was wrong. Would that affect the validity of the replies?

Nov 6, 2019 - 9:25:39 PM

Blackjaxe47

Canada

1450 posts since 6/20/2014

Yes it will affect the validity of most of the replies, fact is people are paying extra $$$ to get that tarnished aged appearance on their nickel plated parts. If you want that shiny nickel than any good metal polish will bring it back to like new. Personally I prefer the aged look, it has mojo.

Nov 6, 2019 - 10:16:44 PM

888 posts since 8/7/2017
Online Now

Ah, I too meant tarnish, not corrosion, on the Stelling. However, if the corrosion was due to humidity, then a wax coating should reduce corrosion.

Hope this helps/clarifies.

Nov 7, 2019 - 7:22:37 AM

6326 posts since 8/28/2013

I'd be careful not only about moisture, but about other corrosives carried in the atmosphere. I've seen small springs in piano actions that fell apart due to being in homes heated with coal or in coal mining regions, and I once encountered an otherwise well cared for piano that had been ruined by corrosive elements while spending years in Panama (screws were so crusty--it wasn't rust, but some kind of white gunk-- they couldn't be removed in most cases). Air anywhere near the ocean is generally salty and salt can be very corrosive. Defoliants and insecticides can also be carried in the air.

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