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Oct 20, 2019 - 10:57:01 AM
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Brian T

Canada

15754 posts since 6/5/2008

Poached eggs on toast. S&P. Then what? Jam, ketchup or syrup or ???
A jar of Rose's Lime Marmalade is calling to me.

Oct 20, 2019 - 11:53:11 AM
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bubbalouie

Canada

12764 posts since 9/27/2007

Every long weekend Terry makes her special Eggs Benny on potato latkes.

She uses Bernaise sauce instead of Hollandaise because we like to add fresh chives & tarragon from the backyard.

I've never cooked poached eggs just for myself. Do you have one of those deals with the little cups in the water cooker thingy?

I've only tried doing them in water with a little vinegar once & never again!

  

Oct 20, 2019 - 12:52:01 PM
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Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

23360 posts since 8/3/2003

Wonder what you did wrong? Get the water to a good simmer ( not a boil), crack the egg in a small container and then gently drop the egg into the water and swirl it around, let it cook for about 2 to 3 minutes and that's it. Always worked well for me.

Oct 20, 2019 - 1:14:02 PM

bubbalouie

Canada

12764 posts since 9/27/2007

I think I had it boiling too hard & didn't drain it enough & ended up with a soggy English muffin.

I used to cook brunch for my friends on Sundays & would cook everything but the toast & eggs & then do everyone's individually. 

I'd do eggs to order & used an egg poacher with great results. 

On of my best days when I was cooking for the riff raff & one guys parents showed up.

He told me later that his Mom said " That guy knows his way around the kitchen"!

Oct 20, 2019 - 2:00:05 PM
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Players Union Member

Brian T

Canada

15754 posts since 6/5/2008

Break 3 eggs into simmering salted water in a fry pan.
When the tops over the yolks go white, get 3 pcs toast going.
Plate the eggs on buttered toast, then what? S&P then ???????
I won't say what I used for toppings, I'm trolling for opinions.

Oct 20, 2019 - 3:06:34 PM
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Players Union Member

Chris Meakin

Australia

2471 posts since 5/15/2011

I cook poached (in a poacher) or scrambled/creamed eggs for breakfast pretty much every morning.

Bob - I've only done the "poached eggs in vinegar and water" a couple of times. I think the trick is to only add a smidgen of vinegar; too much vinegar tastes a little overwhelming.

To answer Brian - I only add a dash of ground black pepper about every second day. I really like the taste of well cooked eggs as they are.  (Properly cooked, not over cooked and rubbery). We buy ours from the farmer's market. They seem to taste better than cage eggs from the supermarket duopoly. When I retire we'll probably get a trio of hens for the backyard.

Oct 20, 2019 - 3:09:48 PM
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70280 posts since 5/9/2007

Once or twice a week.Two english muffins...one pair for the 2 eggs and the other for jam or honey.
Grated cheddar and basil on the eggs.
Pumpkin pie for dessert.

Oct 20, 2019 - 3:10:38 PM

figmo59

USA

29377 posts since 3/5/2008

Put a cap full of vinigar..in the water first...

Makes the egg firm up better n more white..on the white part..

Btw..
On buttered toast... :0)

Oct 20, 2019 - 3:13:32 PM
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figmo59

USA

29377 posts since 3/5/2008

Oh....
No toppings...
EL NATURAL...! :0o

Oct 20, 2019 - 3:34:56 PM
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14346 posts since 12/2/2005

Back in my line cooking days, we'd poach off a mess of eggs before brunch service, bring just to done and shock them in ice water, then bring them back to heat for service by putting them into simmering water for a few minutes.

The keys to successful poached eggs are as follows:

1) The eggs must be VERY fresh. Older eggs just don't hold together.

2) The poaching water should be very gently acidulated - with either vinegar or lemon juice. The acidity helps the white form a skin that holds everything together.

3) The water temperature should be kept just below the boil. It's the violent motion of the water when it's boiling that creates a problem for the eggs holding together.

In other words, it's a technique.

Haven't made them since I was in Paris in the mid-80s, but while there we'd sometimes make Ouefs a la Muerette. These are essentially eggs poached in red wine with a sauce containing lardons (bacon) and other goodness. They looked absolutely disgusting - the eggs turn a weird dingy drab brownish-pinkish color - but they were tasty beyond words.

Oct 20, 2019 - 3:39:47 PM
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70280 posts since 5/9/2007

Mine stay together on their own as long as I don't let the water boil.
Big strainer spoon and cooked in the bacon skillet.
We called them "dropped eggs" growing up.

Oct 20, 2019 - 4:17 PM
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Players Union Member

Brian T

Canada

15754 posts since 6/5/2008

I'm using large size local farm eggs, the big taste is there for sure. Birch syrup if I had any.
I make no effort for them to be really "pretty" in the pan. Just get them cooked.
On the toast, I mash them with a fork. Just a little too cooked this time.
Home raspberry or strawberry jam next time with extra coffee.

I am eating probably 50% more food than I really need.
Lost so much weight pre-op, I need to make up for it.
Seems to be working!

Oct 20, 2019 - 5:11:06 PM

9026 posts since 2/22/2007

I guess that I don't think in terms of topping the eggs. To me, the eggs ARE the topping. So I'll have bacon or ham or sausage on that toast before the eggs top them. And I'm going to be lightly frying those eggs instead of poaching.

Oct 20, 2019 - 6:20:21 PM
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2249 posts since 4/29/2012

I have successfully poached eggs the traditional naked way. But the success rate is not high enough. Big problem if you're doing 2 eggs each and one of the 4 breaks up. I'm the cook so I have to have the broken one. I've got some of those silicon rubber cups that you float in simmering water. Not as pretty but taste just the same and zero failure rate.

Oct 20, 2019 - 11:31:18 PM

Paul R

Canada

11730 posts since 1/28/2010

quote:
Originally posted by bubbalouie

Do you have one of those deals with the little cups in the water cooker thingy?


We have my parents' Revere Ware thingy - and have never used it. The Mrs. orders poached - soft when we go out for brekky. I have scrambled. So the frying pan with the four cup attachment sits lonely and unused.

Oct 21, 2019 - 7:17:45 AM

870 posts since 4/22/2018

Apart from butter on my toast, I don’t add anything else to my poached eggs. They come from our hens which have a varied diet and roam the garden and taste great just as they are - the eggs not the hens smiley

Oct 21, 2019 - 7:27:06 AM

14346 posts since 12/2/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Wet Spaniel

Apart from butter on my toast, I don’t add anything else to my poached eggs. They come from our hens which have a varied diet and roam the garden and taste great just as they are - the eggs not the hens smiley


Yabbut what about the older hens that are nearing the Great Coop in the Sky? A true Coq au Vin can really only be made with an old rooster, but a pretty close approximation can be made with a fowl.

Oct 21, 2019 - 8:25:27 AM
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870 posts since 4/22/2018

quote:
Originally posted by eagleisland
quote:
Originally posted by Wet Spaniel

Apart from butter on my toast, I don’t add anything else to my poached eggs. They come from our hens which have a varied diet and roam the garden and taste great just as they are - the eggs not the hens smiley


Yabbut what about the older hens that are nearing the Great Coop in the Sky? A true Coq au Vin can really only be made with an old rooster, but a pretty close approximation can be made with a fowl.


Oh, I’m ready for that day Skip, it’s just these are our first hens so none of them have made it to that age just yet.  As and when, there’ll be a bottle of red for them to have a nice warm bath in.

Oct 21, 2019 - 11:48:25 AM
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Players Union Member

rinemb

USA

11626 posts since 5/24/2005

If poaching is so tricky. Why not just over easy them in a dry non-stick pan. According to the tv commercials you burn an egg in one of those and they still slide right out. Or is there a flavor diff to a poached egg?
Brad

Oct 21, 2019 - 12:13:22 PM
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bubbalouie

Canada

12764 posts since 9/27/2007

I used to use the pan as described above to poach eggs. No fuss no muss. And yes Brad, why would a guy go to all that trouble to poach an egg for himself when over easy works just fine!

I guess if you were health conscious poaching doesn't add any oil but butter & eggs are in the same food group right?  

Edited to add: I don't have to worry about it now that I have a wonderful wife that makes perfect poached eggs using the "Proper Method".

Edited by - bubbalouie on 10/21/2019 12:18:41

Oct 21, 2019 - 12:31:08 PM

14346 posts since 12/2/2005

quote:
Originally posted by rinemb

If poaching is so tricky. Why not just over easy them in a dry non-stick pan. According to the tv commercials you burn an egg in one of those and they still slide right out. Or is there a flavor diff to a poached egg?
Brad


Difference in both flavor and texture, just as there is a difference in flavor and texture between fried and scrambled.

Oct 21, 2019 - 1:02:54 PM
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70280 posts since 5/9/2007

I find poaching to be the easiest way to cook an egg.Not that there's a particularly difficult way.

Oct 21, 2019 - 4:45:55 PM

figmo59

USA

29377 posts since 3/5/2008

Soft boiled is good too...

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