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Oct 19, 2019 - 6:37:19 PM
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3174 posts since 9/13/2018

This was the 1st tractor I ever got to use for farm work. After awhile, dad upgraded to an old ford 8n. Once we could master that.... then we were allowed to drive the JD 4020. The workhorse. 6 cyl. With 8 forward speeds and 2 Rev. I loved this machine. My uncle bill in Michigan bought the pair. Shortly after, he died of cancer. Rats! His older son now uses both of them on his small farm. Mostly to tend his weed, and a few horses. It’s nice to know they’re both still running.

Oct 19, 2019 - 6:46:46 PM
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3174 posts since 9/13/2018

Farmall cub


 

Oct 20, 2019 - 7:49:47 AM

1318 posts since 2/10/2013

Hey. I worked with a gal who owned one of those. Her late husband had bought one. On his initial attempt to ride it, he did a "wheely", and never got on it again.
One day in a discussion, my workmate told me her late husband had loaned the tractor to a friend, and this person had it for several years. I told her to have it hauled back to her place, put it in her big front lawn, and hang a "for sale" sign on it. That baby sold right away. Great for mowing big yards and plowing driveways.

Oct 20, 2019 - 8:37:42 AM

52632 posts since 12/14/2005

Speaking of tractors:

It would have been SUCH a publicity stunt, to have a caravan of Minneapolis-Moline tractors go FROM Minneapolis Minnesota TO Moline, IL.

About 362 miles.

But,  it would actually be LONGER, because they would not be allowed on the freeways.

Oct 20, 2019 - 8:49:06 AM

chuckv97

Canada

44246 posts since 10/5/2013
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To segue from Moline, the Farmall was manufactured at the IH plant in Rock Island, IL, a neighbor of Moline.

"On February 1, 1974, at 9:00 A.M., the 5,000,000th IH tractor came off the assembly line at the Farmall Works plant in Rock Island, Illinois. IH was the first tractor manufacturer to officially accomplish this production threshold". 

Edited by - chuckv97 on 10/20/2019 08:51:40

Oct 20, 2019 - 9:05:43 AM

2394 posts since 9/12/2016

Those Ms and Hs are still sitting around a lot My neighbor has a cub.A lot of them also. In tobacco country, a cultivating light weight tractor was the best choice.I like the old governed gas engines .They have personality. About a dozen great names in the vintage class ,in this area. Fine example when running.D@#$ piece of junk ,when it refuses.
As far as red,when it rains I would put the Persian Orange ones in the barn first.2 1949 Bs on my mowing crew

Oct 20, 2019 - 9:11:16 AM
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Owen

Canada

4232 posts since 6/5/2011

Link to some specs for the Farmall Cub: http://www.tractordata.com/farm-tractors/004/6/8/4686-farmall-cub.html

Along with my siblings, the first tractor I operated (?)  was a  '42 John Deere "B" [hand clutch, no fenders*].  From that we graduated to the big (?) tractor... a Co-op "E4" [same as Cockshutt 40].  

* =  my mom seemed very concerned about the "no fenders" and continually reminded us to be careful.  Apparently it worked... 9 kids and no tractor accidents.

Edited by - Owen on 10/20/2019 09:24:14

Oct 20, 2019 - 4:35:14 PM

3174 posts since 9/13/2018

There were 7 of us Owen. Only one with a flat foot ! Backing the wagon up miscue .....

Oct 20, 2019 - 5:37:25 PM
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1812 posts since 10/17/2013
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Speaking of Farmalls and tractors in general:

A snapshot from Old Iron Days 2019 - Fredonia, KS
















 

Edited by - bluegrassbanjopicker on 10/20/2019 17:45:19

Oct 20, 2019 - 6:17:12 PM

Owen

Canada

4232 posts since 6/5/2011

Thanks Luke.  On the pic of the crawler with "THIRTY" on the radiator, does "Cold weather kit" refer to the sheet metal shroud, or is there more to it?  I'm guessing it was to hold heat to the engine to make it run more efficiently... rather than for operator comfort (?). 

For winter "comfort" (?) on the "E4" we had a "Heat Houser" ...a far cry from a real cab, but also a far cry from nothing at all.

.Heat Houser For Farmall Ih

That JD "B" looks like a "new and improved" model.  Ours had cast iron (?) engine frame rails, tin pan seat, no elec. system [i.e. lots of hand pulling on the flywheel.  ...somehow it looked much easier when an older brother was doing it].   My younger brother still has it... turns it over a couple of times each year, but hasn't had it actually running in probably 20 years [I think it needs a replacement magneto??]

Edited by - Owen on 10/20/2019 18:18:25

Oct 20, 2019 - 7:06:50 PM
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1812 posts since 10/17/2013
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I think the “cold weather kit” just refers to the engine shroud. Anything more, would be a fully enclosed cab, and there was no evidence of that tractor ever having one. I can’t say it didn’t, but it’s not likely.

Edited by - bluegrassbanjopicker on 10/20/2019 19:15:48

Oct 21, 2019 - 6:07:48 AM

2394 posts since 9/12/2016

Mid 30s those guys came up with the little tractors to take to the fields and turn in and out of rows with the brakes. Allis WC -or farmall F12 poppin john A's etc. machines weighing in less than 2 tons vs.the giants (many tons). already around.The big ones were too big for any thing but stationary work I think.With my b allis and hitting the brake ,I can turn even more acute than so called zero turn

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