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Cheatin' in the Chili Cook-Off

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Oct 17, 2019 - 7:54:27 AM
176 posts since 4/11/2019

So its going to be the First Annual Chili Cook Off at work on the 31st.

There are only about 10 entrants, the Big Boss has a history of winning much bigger competitions than this one.

I haven't made any chili in years, but I will be expected to at least make a showing.

I'm looking for something a little bit exotic, but not too far out there.

Please, no roadkill or more than two ghost peppers.

Oct 17, 2019 - 8:00:40 AM
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878 posts since 4/22/2018

In addition to minced beef, I put some pre cooked small dices of pork shoulder and chorizo in mine. Along with a small amount of wine vinegar, brown sugar and a cinnamon stick. It’s from a recipe I found in a book, but it really does taste very good.

Oct 17, 2019 - 8:01:34 AM
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878 posts since 4/22/2018

I’d love to,go to a chilli cook off - that’s my idea of heaven.

Oct 17, 2019 - 8:02:15 AM
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8949 posts since 8/22/2006

Confuse the judges with white chili. Mmm tasty stuff.

Oct 17, 2019 - 8:03:46 AM

176 posts since 4/11/2019

Post up some recipies, I'm going on vacation until Monday but I will be looking in every now and then. Thanks!

Oct 17, 2019 - 8:11:06 AM
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Dragonslayer

Mozambique

161 posts since 10/9/2019

Oct 17, 2019 - 8:42:38 AM
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Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

23392 posts since 8/3/2003

Use either 80/20 ground round or a lean chili meat. NO BEANS!!! Dave and I used to cook competition chili for CASI and I have a recipe that was a winner in many a CASI cookoff. If you're interested, let me know and I'll either PM it to you or post it here.

Oct 17, 2019 - 10:33:52 AM

Owen

Canada

4232 posts since 6/5/2011

quote:
Originally posted by 5B-Ranch

Confuse the judges with white chili. <snip>


...or white wine?

Oct 17, 2019 - 11:04:48 AM
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Mooooo

USA

7160 posts since 8/20/2016
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Replacing some of the water with a bottle of stout or porter will do wonders for your chili.

Oct 17, 2019 - 11:44:39 AM

Tim13

USA

3107 posts since 4/1/2008

Alton Browns recipe for "Texas Red" no bean chili is pretty good.

Oct 17, 2019 - 2:06:24 PM

8949 posts since 8/22/2006

quote:
Originally posted by Owen
quote:
Originally posted by 5B-Ranch

Confuse the judges with white chili.


...or white wine?


That would probably work! 

Oct 17, 2019 - 7:11:47 PM
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1812 posts since 10/17/2013
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Cheating in a chili cookoff...?

...Make chilly ...from ready-to-heat-up chili cans bought from the grossery store like my Grandma did once. She won 1st pryze. 

Oct 17, 2019 - 7:18:06 PM

1902 posts since 1/16/2010

I’ve got a 100+ year old Texas family chili recipe. While I am not allowed to share it, I will say...make sure you have plenty of fat in it for flavor. A key ingredient in mine is a pound of “ground suet”. In days past, a person could buy suet at the local butcher, it’s a thick yellow, flavorful fat on the kidneys. Think about that for yours. This 100+ year old Texas recipe also has beans in it...go figure.

Good luck and have fun.

Dow

Oct 17, 2019 - 7:29:55 PM

1812 posts since 10/17/2013
Online Now

Hey Dow,

Not to go off topic, but I love your avatar of Earl and Lester poring over the banjo.

Earl: “Wow, it’s really mine! I can’t believe it!”

Lester: “ Wow, I really wish it were mine! I can’t believe it’s yours!”

Edited by - bluegrassbanjopicker on 10/17/2019 19:30:47

Oct 17, 2019 - 9:54:30 PM
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1902 posts since 1/16/2010

quote:
Originally posted by bluegrassbanjopicker

Hey Dow,

Not to go off topic, but I love your avatar of Earl and Lester poring over the banjo.

Earl: “Wow, it’s really mine! I can’t believe it!”

Lester: “ Wow, I really wish it were mine! I can’t believe it’s yours!”


Thanks Luke! It’s Earl’s Vega. I think the captions actually probably read something like this...

Earl: “ What the heck am I really gonna do with this Lester?” 

Lester: “I don’t know Earl,  but you’re stuck with it now!” 

Oct 18, 2019 - 5:50:40 AM
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9055 posts since 2/22/2007

Luke posted---"..Make chilly ...from ready-to-heat-up chili cans bought from the grossery store like my Grandma did once. She won 1st pryze. ---"

We were recently invited to a chili party where everyone was supposed to make chili and everyone tasted all each other's version. It was not a contest, just an excuse for a party. My wife is still very busy with work and I've never made chili from scratch, so I mixed two cans of Skyline Chili, a pound of browned ground beef, one large onion, and random spices and hot sauces from the pantry and let it all simmer awhile. We liked our chili better than any homemade version there and so did many other guests!

Oct 18, 2019 - 5:57:13 AM
Players Union Member

wizofos

USA

5246 posts since 8/19/2012

I like to add some powdered bitter (baking) chocolate to my chili. I like spicy chili but not hot for the purpose of being hot if it does not add to the taste. Anyone can add a bunch of ghost peppers but to me the idea is to add taste not just spice heat. If you think that chocolate is not traditional the Aztecs used to drink hot chocolate with peppers.

Oct 18, 2019 - 6:24:04 AM

tmercks

USA

706 posts since 3/7/2006

I use a crock pot and four beans - pintos, kidney, northern, and black. I start the night before and let the beans heat up in the water, and toss in a bay leaf. Then change the water before bed. In the morning, I drain and add tomato sauce. My daughter says this method takes all the "fun" out of the beans. Get rid of the bay leaf and add sauteed onions cooked in with your meat, diced tomatoes, diced green peppers or the heat of your choice. Use a good seasoning mix in the meat. I also like to dice up mushrooms and add them in. You might add a touch of flavor by using a chicken broth instead of water on the beans. Just some suggestions. The real deal is in the meat seasonings-spices you use. There ya go. Worthless advice from a good man... or vice versa.

Oct 18, 2019 - 7:58:48 AM
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Tobus

USA

1957 posts since 11/17/2015

quote:
Originally posted by Texican65

I’ve got a 100+ year old Texas family chili recipe. While I am not allowed to share it, I will say...make sure you have plenty of fat in it for flavor. A key ingredient in mine is a pound of “ground suet”. In days past, a person could buy suet at the local butcher, it’s a thick yellow, flavorful fat on the kidneys. Think about that for yours. This 100+ year old Texas recipe also has beans in it...go figure.

Good luck and have fun.

Dow


I do wish that suet were easier to find here in the USA.  I have to specially request the butcher to cut me some, and they look at me funny when I explain to them that it's traditional for the puddings that I make.  I don't know why it fell out of favor here, but you're right: it adds excellent flavor to anything it's used for.

Beans in chili, though?  Them's fightin' words.

Oct 18, 2019 - 8:22:34 AM
Players Union Member

Brian T

Canada

15780 posts since 6/5/2008

Chili con carne' is chili with meat. Hard to find real beans to begin with.

The local city Forest Service office decided to have a chili cookoff. Has become an annual charity fundraiser.
Anyway, the recipe for the winner in Year One was published in the newspaper.
I was lookng for a good recipe and that one has been in my book ever since (25+ years).
The two things that made it taste right to me were the cumin and the vinegar.

Oct 18, 2019 - 8:25:06 AM

269 posts since 9/21/2018

I won a chili cook-off at work before. not sure how much you are supposed to bring but you can easily scale the recipe.

I use a pound of ground sirloin, and a pound of ground venison. Season with salt, pepper, garlic, and onion powder, brown and crumble in a large-ish wok.

Add one large diced white onion, and 2 diced poblano peppers. Sate with the meat for a few minutes, don't let the veggies soften too much.

Add 2 cans of the rotel with the green chiles (I think), 2 cans of diced-stewed tomatoes (the kind with basil in it works well too), and a large jar of cheap salsa. Add one can of black chili beans, one can of red chili beans. I don't drain any of this, just dump it in. Add a little water if it looks like it needs it, I usually use the salsa jar so I get any leftovers out of it. It should be thick but workable without too much fuss.

Add dark red chili powder, cumin, garlic powder. I'm a sprinkler, so I don't have quantities, it's a consequence of being a southerner I think. I use more chili powder than cumin. Start by lightly coating the top of the mixture with the chili powder, same for about half with the cumin, mix well and taste.

Cook it down until it looks like chili.

It's an easy recipe.

Oct 18, 2019 - 11:22:27 AM

14356 posts since 12/2/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Tobus

I do wish that suet were easier to find here in the USA.  I have to specially request the butcher to cut me some, and they look at me funny when I explain to them that it's traditional for the puddings that I make.  I don't know why it fell out of favor here, but you're right: it adds excellent flavor to anything it's used for.

Beans in chili, though?  Them's fightin' words.


That's interesting - one can find it in the supermarkets up here pretty much year-round - though I daresay most of the purchasers are hanging it for birds.

I can find enjoyment in a chili with beans, but I make mine without. Have been known to serve a nice pot of flavorful beans on the side, in that they do go together fairly well - but I leave it to the individual as to whether they actually mix them in.

No powder for me. I start my chili with whole dried chiles - Anaheim or New Mexico - soaked, pureed and strained. Cooked with a bit of Mexican oregano, salt and pepper. I'll add some roasted green chiles (usually poblanos - I grow my own chiles). I'll brown the meat (cubed beef and pork) in pork fat and sweat some onions and garlic. Generous dose of cumin at that point. All ingredients into a dutch oven, plus half a bottle of beer and some beef stock, adjust seasonings - including boosting the heat with dried cayenne peppers - then simmer gently for an hour or two. Adjust seasonings again and serve.

You might notice the absence of tomato product.

Oct 22, 2019 - 8:14:34 AM

176 posts since 4/11/2019

Thanks everyone for your input!

I've got some research to do now!

Oct 24, 2019 - 8:39:17 AM
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mander

USA

3867 posts since 10/7/2007

quote:
Originally posted by Knows Picker

So its going to be the First Annual Chili Cook Off at work on the 31st.

There are only about 10 entrants, the Big Boss has a history of winning much bigger competitions than this one.

I haven't made any chili in years, but I will be expected to at least make a showing.

I'm looking for something a little bit exotic, but not too far out there.

Please, no roadkill or more than two ghost peppers.


Not that I would ever do this...

Our son's friend is one of those "must win at all costs" kind of guys. You can try one of the below:

1) have someone distract the BIG Boss while you dump his chili into your pot and your chili into his.

2) put the BIG Boss's chili on HIGH until it's burned on the bottom, then mix the burnt part in with the rest of it.

3) Dump a pound of cinnamon sugar into the pot and stir it in.

You get the idea. If you can't win, make sure the competition loses. ;-)

You did not hear this here.

Oct 24, 2019 - 8:45:31 AM
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176 posts since 4/11/2019

HA !

You are bad.

Oct 25, 2019 - 5:39:20 AM

191 posts since 10/9/2017
Online Now

Chocolate has already been recommended and I’ll second it. Just make sure it’s the unsweetened dark kind. Your local bodega might have the Mexican version of same. I’ve also heard of unsweetened peanut butter, the fresh ground kind, as a secret ingredient, but can’t vouch for it. If I were trying to put together a recipe over several tries I’d definitely experiment with it.

Heat is heat and flavor is flavor. I like my chilis to be toasted for the latter. I put dried ancho and New Mexicans in the toaster oven until they’re fragrant then get them out quick before they burn. Then I grind them to powder.

Don’t hold back on the cumin.

I always use chuck cubes unless I can get boneless short ribs cheap. If I had a ready supply of four-legged game, I’d probably use that too. We don’t eat pork, but I’ve used beef “bacon” to good effect. I’m sure the real thing would be as good or better.

The only time I was in a chili cook off the judge, who was very Texas, said that beans are great, in a bowl, on the side, where they belong.

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