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thinking of getting a guitar.i have been playing my banjo for some 48 years

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Nov 19, 2019 - 9:27:24 AM

100 posts since 1/7/2019

Ibanez Artwood would be worth a look. Most of them have solid spruce tops. However, I don't care for the "OPN" suffix on certain model numbers, which stands for "Open Pore Finish". I played one that sounded good, just didn't like the thin satin finish. I would want to choose one in person, not buy online, unless you get a good return policy. Reason being, you want to avoid the Friday afternoon or Monday morning-made guitars, or the one with not so good intonation. This is with any brand, not only Ibanez.

My main two guitars are a Gibson J35 reissue, and an Ibanez Artwood AC-300 (000 size body). The Gibson is very nice but cost over a grand slightly used a few years back. The Ibanez AC-300 I found used in a music store for $150. Solid spruce top. I don't care so much that the back and sides are laminated. The one I found is great. Superb tone and playability.

Nov 19, 2019 - 9:59:07 AM

conic

UK

591 posts since 2/15/2014

I have owned tons of guitars over 45 years and the best one for quality, tone, feels good to hold and play as well as price is a Big Baby Taylor. try one out and dont confuse it with the smaller baby taylor which is naff.
They sell very cheap second hand

Nov 19, 2019 - 10:10:29 AM

kjcole

USA

1191 posts since 4/21/2003

I went the same route as a few others here - played banjo first, and then added guitar and mandolin. It's great to have options at jams when banjo already is covered, and/or when you want to lead a vocal tune. Plus they are both great fun. Regardless of buying a guitar new or used, you'd do well to get a good setup from a luthier experienced in setting up steel-string acoustic guitars for flatpicking. Besides neck relief and action at the 12th fret, playability benefits immensely from proper action at the nut-first fret (which an experienced luthier will examine). Don't rely on factory setup if you are looking at $1000 guitars - I've picked some up that were torture to play in first position. And don't fall back on light, low-tension strings to improve playability - picking mushy strings will hold you back. Instead have that setup checked by someone who knows what they are doing.

Nov 19, 2019 - 11:45:44 AM

155 posts since 11/21/2015

Thanks for the info, huh. I was going to try mandolin but I heard it was hard... heck I stuck with banjo and I thought that was hard the first few years...

Edited by - Gary r voigt on 11/19/2019 11:47:47

Nov 21, 2019 - 5:49:09 AM

kjcole

USA

1191 posts since 4/21/2003

I find some things about the mandolin easier than guitar or banjo, and other things harder (coming from the perspective of someone who learned BG banjo first, guitar much later, and then started mandolin even later). First, the easier part: because the mando is tuned in perfect fifths (G-D-A-E -- D is a 5th above G, A is a 5th above D, etc) scales and hence melodies lay out on the fretboard nicely, and chord shape 'maps' on the neck are more systematic. G-tuned banjos and standard guitar tuning has that 'pesky' B string. So if you are one keen on playing 'by ear' and improvising breaks, the mando puts up less of a fight. Now to the harder part: to get those great chop rhythms and sounds (beyond the basic chop) requires a wrist looseness that you don't gain from guitar necessarily. And then there's the tremolo - getting one that sounds beautiful at a variety of speeds is something you don't get overnight (singularly frustrating for me). But the upside to the mandolin is its unique sounds compared to banjo or guitar - from the powerful rhythm chop to the shimmering sounds of rippling waters on a Western North Carolina mountain stream. I'm just a beginner but it is seductive.

Nov 21, 2019 - 7:42:24 AM

155 posts since 11/21/2015

Thanks so much for the great imput.

Gary

Nov 25, 2019 - 1:55:33 PM

3196 posts since 12/6/2009

I have a 1967 Martin D18....you can't have.

Nov 25, 2019 - 2:12:48 PM

155 posts since 11/21/2015

Your about 2 months behind dude... your way to slow on your redponse... I ended up buying a 1953 martin... so stick that up your pipe and smoke it.... lol. If you don't have any helpful info then keep comments to yourself...

Nov 26, 2019 - 1:41:41 PM

3196 posts since 12/6/2009

quote:
Originally posted by Gary r voigt

Your about 2 months behind dude... your way to slow on your redponse... I ended up buying a 1953 martin... so stick that up your pipe and smoke it.... lol. If you don't have any helpful info then keep comments to yourself...


it was a joke slowpoke....smile you're on candid camera......older years don't matter its what the year produced that does....I had a 52 triple 0 18....I like the 67 much better...deeper cleaner playing and great intonation all up and down the neck....I've been picking g-tar for over 60 years...... anyway good luck with the 53 ....what model is it?

Nov 26, 2019 - 2:05:52 PM

155 posts since 11/21/2015

I know it was a joke... I was not in a mood for jokes that day... have a good one..

Gary

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