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Sep 23, 2019 - 9:30:21 AM
1835 posts since 2/7/2008

I know this sounds silly, but I'm looking for input on what type of air hose people use with their finish spray guns. I was having trouble with oil getting in to my air and now that I've gotten a new, oil less compressor, I figured I'd get new hose in case the old hose was contaminated. For air tools, I've always used whatever I had on hand, but if I'm going to get new hose, I'll dedicate it to my spray rig. As I'm shopping, I see all kinds - Hybrid (whatever that is :), polyurethane, PVC, polymer, rubber. My total run is only about 30 feet, so even the best stuff shouldn't break my budget.


Also, I'm assuming I should get 3/8" to ensure adequate air flow, but opinions on that are welcome too.

Does anyone have any favorite hose for using with a spray rig?

Sep 23, 2019 - 2:09:34 PM

12136 posts since 6/29/2005

I have my air compressor right next to where I spray, and use use one of those yellow slinky-spring-like hoses that stretch out—works great, and I am spraying with a DeVilbiss siphon type "touch-up" gun at between 40 and 50 PSI.

Sep 23, 2019 - 2:51:17 PM
Players Union Member

rudy

USA

14472 posts since 3/27/2004

I have a 1/4" by 50 foot hybrid hose attached to the 30 foot 3/8" that came on my compressor.  I like it a lot and the smaller size makes it much more like using an extension cord for power tools.

It depends a bit on what kind of volume and distance you are looking to use.  If you're going to run a HVLP gun then it's different than using a brad nailer.

Spray finishes are a general PITA, so I go for other finish options.  I used to have a large tank compressor, water/ oil separator, large and small touch up finish guns and spent more time trying to get consistent results than I wanted to invest.  A part time builder often ends up getting sucked down the wormhole of trying out various finishes and then wondering how to deal with blushing ,fisheyes, etc. every time the weather changes.

I DO NOT regret sending all that stuff off to the humane society garage sale. 

Sep 23, 2019 - 6:31:27 PM

beegee

USA

21326 posts since 7/6/2005

I use whatever I have. I have some rubber, some PVC. I don't like the yellow springy ones. I like for my air hoses to behave themselves. I try to use hard lines to supply air to very short hoses, except for the hose that blows dust out of the shop. Use oil and moisture traps and water drops in your hard lines.

Sep 23, 2019 - 8:12:41 PM
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14806 posts since 2/7/2003
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You MUST have a moisture and oil trap in line when spraying

Scott

Sep 24, 2019 - 4:54:46 AM

12136 posts since 6/29/2005

You never said but I am assuming you are spraying lacquer.

Ever since I started spraying the newer water borne finishes, a lot of the problems associated with moisture and humidity have ceased to be problems.

Sep 25, 2019 - 6:53:50 PM

1835 posts since 2/7/2008

quote:
Originally posted by Ken LeVan

You never said but I am assuming you are spraying lacquer.

Ever since I started spraying the newer water borne finishes, a lot of the problems associated with moisture and humidity have ceased to be problems.


Actually, I had been trying to spray lacquer, but my lack of success and the flammability and toxicity caused me to give up. Recently, I've discovered Crystalac Brite Tone water based which has re-kindled my interest in spraying. I still can't get an "off the gun" finish, but I feel like I'm closer to getting it dialed in. 

Sep 26, 2019 - 4:54:57 AM

12136 posts since 6/29/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Quickstep192
quote:
Originally posted by Ken LeVan

You never said but I am assuming you are spraying lacquer.

Ever since I started spraying the newer water borne finishes, a lot of the problems associated with moisture and humidity have ceased to be problems.


Actually, I had been trying to spray lacquer, but my lack of success and the flammability and toxicity caused me to give up. Recently, I've discovered Crystalac Brite Tone water based which has re-kindled my interest in spraying. I still can't get an "off the gun" finish, but I feel like I'm closer to getting it dialed in. 


In terms of an "off the gun finish", both with lacquer and poly, you have to do many coats, wet-sanding or 3-M cloth in between and then buff it down with compound.  It will never look good right "out of the gun".

Here are my steps, which are EXACTLY the same as when I used nitro

I first stain it with alcohol based aniline stain, maybe 3 or 4 coats depending on the color, brushed on, 3-M in between.

Then use de waxed shellac (sealcoat), brushed on the seal the stain as a sanding sealer and sand and 3-M that.  I like the 3M flexible sandpaper .

Then spray, as amny coats as it takes.  Here's the "out-of-the-gun" finish before compounding.  I stop short of the very plastic looking finish for aesthetic reasons, but that depends entirely on what you want and how many coats.,

Hret is the compounding:

Sep 26, 2019 - 5:41:37 AM

1835 posts since 2/7/2008

Ken,

That’s beautiful work.
Do you sand between each and every coat? If you accidentally sand through on the early coats, how do you fix or disguise it?

Sep 28, 2019 - 6:00:21 PM

12136 posts since 6/29/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Quickstep192

Ken,

That’s beautiful work.
Do you sand between each and every coat? If you accidentally sand through on the early coats, how do you fix or disguise it?


I do sand between nearly every coat.  At the end, when I am building up thickness, I may spray 2 coats before sanding, and I never use rougher than 220 or a gray 3M cloth.  Just before the final buffing, I usually wet sand with 320 3M flexible paper (which is called "SandBlaster"

The waterborne spray finishes are considerably tougher and more durable than lacquer, so it's difficult to accidentally sand through except maybe around the edges of pegheads.

If I accidentally sand through I just use a little more alcohol stain with my finger to restore the color and maybe touch it up with a brush (same thing I would do with lacquer).

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