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Sep 17, 2019 - 1:15:05 PM
74 posts since 3/19/2018

I've seen this design in a few banjos. Looked through the archives and couldn't find much about how to carve this. I would think you take a bandsaw to it and the sand the top and bottom as best you can. Also, can't you see the truss rod channel or carbon fiber channel there in the center if you looked into the heel?  I've never seen one of these in person so I don't really know.  Any thoughts on how you might cut something like this?


 

Edited by - sig1965 on 09/17/2019 13:16:08

Sep 17, 2019 - 1:49:47 PM
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291 posts since 3/26/2015

Id use a band saw. Keep the neck aligned with a straight block on the table so you are making an even cut on both the top and bottom (left and right when installed on banjo) of heel. It the neck is not square to the table you risk having the cut come out poorly and unevenly. Or make the cut when the neck is still in block form.  I used to do that for one piece flange bluegrass necks before I had a heel cutting blade for my shaper.

This banjo may not have a truss rod, or the rod doesn't go that far down.  Take a look at Dogwood banjos too.  Mike Chew  might give you some pointers on what he does.  He's on FB, instagram etc.


Chris

Edited by - CompanionBanjo on 09/17/2019 13:52:52

Sep 17, 2019 - 5:12:45 PM
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1451 posts since 6/2/2010

Definitely cut it out with band saw while neck is in block form.

Sep 18, 2019 - 12:33:41 AM
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Helix1

USA

447 posts since 4/17/2019

That's a one piece neck. I just finished an Enoch Tradesman. Yours looks like Cherry. No truss rod, nor carbon. A one piece neck can be VERY stable. The Ebony fingerboard is like decking on a ship.

I want to hear about the cut and why. The blank needs square and parallel sides. It's a tricky and skillful cut. I hope it makes the banjo sound better and last longer.

here's a clawhammer handle for when you finally get a handle on that clawhammer tune you've been working. " I see he finally got a handle on that clawhammer."


Sep 18, 2019 - 6:27:37 AM

sig1965

USA

74 posts since 3/19/2018

quote:
Originally posted by Helix1

That's a one piece neck. I just finished an Enoch Tradesman. Yours looks like Cherry. No truss rod, nor carbon. A one piece neck can be VERY stable. The Ebony fingerboard is like decking on a ship.

I want to hear about the cut and why. The blank needs square and parallel sides. It's a tricky and skillful cut. I hope it makes the banjo sound better and last longer.

here's a clawhammer handle for when you finally get a handle on that clawhammer tune you've been working. " I see he finally got a handle on that clawhammer."


That is a random picture from the internet, not mine.  I was just considering cutting my nearly-finished neck with a design like this.  I'm new to woodworking as of 6-7 months ago, and used banjo making as my entree since I love clawhammer so much.  Great advice on starting when it's still in block form.  Makes tons of sense to start at that point.  Also makes sense that it's a one piece neck rather than laminated.  I use carbon fiber rods and cut the slit the whole distance down the neck billet but I suppose that the channel doesn't need to be the whole length (e.g., like a truss rod channel is only cut to the fit the length of the rod).  Thanks for the advice.

Edited by - sig1965 on 09/18/2019 06:28:41

Sep 18, 2019 - 1:33:47 PM
Players Union Member

Helix1

USA

447 posts since 4/17/2019

Ask anything, this is a fun forum

Sep 19, 2019 - 6:15:27 AM
Players Union Member

rudy

USA

14486 posts since 3/27/2004

quote:
Originally posted by sig1965

I've seen this design in a few banjos. Looked through the archives and couldn't find much about how to carve this. I would think you take a bandsaw to it and the sand the top and bottom as best you can. Also, can't you see the truss rod channel or carbon fiber channel there in the center if you looked into the heel?  I've never seen one of these in person so I don't really know.  Any thoughts on how you might cut something like this?


Hi Lindsay,

Here's one of the better archived discussions involving how to do the Dobson scroll heel cut:

Scroll cut heel discussion

Of particular note is Lyndon Smith's description of exactly how he does the cut.

Edited by - rudy on 09/19/2019 06:18:30

Sep 19, 2019 - 7:26:46 AM

12150 posts since 6/29/2005

As with so many woodworking operations, the key to doing this would be to cut the side-view shape of the neck blank while the block of wood is still square. Trying to do it after the neck has been rounded off would be much much harder and require elaborate fixtures to hold the neck square to the bandsaw blade.

Sep 19, 2019 - 8:31:59 AM
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17 posts since 5/27/2019

If you decide to attempt it, make several practice blanks of the same wood species and dimensions as your real neck blank. You can probably make the practice blanks 8 inches long or so, and then practice the cut on each end. Repeat until you have all your tool adjustments worked out and technique down cold. Good luck!

Sep 19, 2019 - 9:52:31 AM
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12150 posts since 6/29/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Uke-alot

If you decide to attempt it, make several practice blanks of the same wood species and dimensions as your real neck blank. You can probably make the practice blanks 8 inches long or so, and then practice the cut on each end. Repeat until you have all your tool adjustments worked out and technique down cold. Good luck!


Excellent advice!

Any time I am trying to figure out something I don't understand 3-dimensionally, or don't know how to approach making it,  I make a model in some easy to carve material, often followed by a model in a material more like what I am actually going to use.  If all goes well, by the time I make the real thing, I won't mess it up.

I wanted to make a curved peghead, and went through a "learning curve" trying to figure it out.

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