Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

372
Banjo Lovers Online


Want to hide these Google ads? Join the Players Union!

Page: 1  2   3   Next Page   Last Page (3) 

Sep 16, 2019 - 3:53:16 PM
like this
5206 posts since 8/19/2012

Last night was the first of a series titled 'Country Music' on NPR. Tonight is Episode 2 1933-1945. Last night was extensive coverage about the Carter family and Jimmy Rodgers as well as others.
Good stuff.

Sep 16, 2019 - 4:03:28 PM

4201 posts since 8/3/2012

(I think you mean PBS)

Almost makes me wish I had a television.

Sep 16, 2019 - 4:05:22 PM

354 posts since 1/28/2013

Yeah, I watched it, watching it tonight. It is interesting that the banjo was more popular than the guitar in Country music in the beginning. Today the banjo is not even allowed.

Edited by - jan dupree on 09/16/2019 16:06:33

Sep 16, 2019 - 4:06:53 PM

797 posts since 11/17/2018

quote:
Originally posted by wizofos

Last night was the first of a series titled 'Country Music' on NPR. Tonight is Episode 2 1933-1945. Last night was extensive coverage about the Carter family and Jimmy Rodgers as well as others.
Good stuff.


Recording it.

Sep 16, 2019 - 4:10:11 PM
Players Union Member

wizofos

USA

5206 posts since 8/19/2012

quote:
Originally posted by OldBlindGuy

(I think you mean PBS)

Almost makes me wish I had a television.


Here in Wisconsin it is called WPT, Wisconsin Public Television.  I just typed NPR without thinking since that is what I have as button #1 in my truck.

Sep 16, 2019 - 4:15:41 PM
like this

354 posts since 1/28/2013

I wish they would have featured more of Charlie Poole. He had a greater influence on Country music than they showed.

Sep 17, 2019 - 4:40:50 AM
likes this

Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

23296 posts since 8/3/2003

I watched it and thought it was just a tribute to Jimmy Rodgers, as he was about the only one that was featured.

Sep 17, 2019 - 5:25:45 AM
Players Union Member

heavy5

USA

955 posts since 11/3/2016

Yes Rogers & the Carters did seem to dominate the program so far but it was interesting .
I didn't realize it was performers like Bob Wills & Gene Autry that influenced the Cowboy dress which strangely trickled into bluegrass & its Appalachian heritage .

Edited by - heavy5 on 09/17/2019 05:27:35

Sep 17, 2019 - 5:49:47 AM

4680 posts since 9/21/2007

quote:
Originally posted by heavy5

Yes Rogers & the Carters did seem to dominate the program so far but it was interesting .
I didn't realize it was performers like Bob Wills & Gene Autry that influenced the Cowboy dress which strangely trickled into bluegrass & its Appalachian heritage .


I have not watched it yet. 

Did they mention how "cowboy" music or was a bizarre mix of cowboy themed Hawaiian music with Tyrolean yodeling mixed in?

Sep 17, 2019 - 6:03:28 AM

69 posts since 8/15/2019
Online Now

It's been pretty good so far. I do think the focus on the Carters and Jimmie Rogers was a bit too much, but they were major factors in the beginning and still influence the genre.

As a sidebar, when I met my wife, she lived in Mammoth Spring, Arkansas. Every year, the little town with the 7th largest spring in the world holds a "Solemn Old Judge" Days festival in honor of George Hay. Seems George was in Mammoth Spring on business and he attended a local pickin' event that was a weekly thing there at the time. This is said to have inspired him to put together the radio show that would become the Grand Ol' Opry.

Sep 17, 2019 - 6:12:41 AM

10871 posts since 6/17/2003

I saw the second show last night. It was interesting to hear about the personal lives of the famous players from the past known to me only by name until now. I found the history and development of the radio station network very informative, and it was a stark reminder of the hardships endured by those that went before us. We truly are in a great time period insofar as the availability of quality instruments are concerned.

Sep 17, 2019 - 7:00:23 AM
Players Union Member

rinemb

USA

11558 posts since 5/24/2005

I am enjoying it. Having been an amateur student of a lot of country music history and artists, I am still learning a lot of stuff and enjoying the video and photos. Brad

Sep 17, 2019 - 7:13:47 AM

51 posts since 4/24/2019

Tyler Mahan Coe, son of David Allen Coe, has a great pod cast called "Cocaine and Rhinestones". There were some amazing characters and really weird stories that I'm sure Ken Burns wouldn't touch with a Seeger long neck. Also, check out Pokey Lafarge's TED talk on how commercial interests split Hilly Billy music off from the Blues around the time of Jimmy Rogers to sell the same music to segregated audiences. Rogers and Maybelle Carter learned their guitar technique and many of their songs from blacks.

Sep 17, 2019 - 7:26:38 AM

chuckv97

Canada

43546 posts since 10/5/2013

Interesting that Rodgers’ music was so blue-drenched but it took another 25+ years for another white guy singing blues (or R&B) backed up by an electric guitar playing Merle Travis style - a style copped from black guitarists - to take the world by storm. (Elvis & Scotty Moore).

Sep 17, 2019 - 9:16:38 AM

907 posts since 12/2/2013

I watched it also and then a light bulb exploded in my head: this isn't about bluegrass, it is an examination of country music, which to be gentle, some of us don't listen to or respect. Speaking only for myself, expectations for something "serious" about bluegrass seems like the wish of a bastard son, hoping for affirmation/acceptance,  but never getting it.

Edited by - flyingsquirrelinlay on 09/17/2019 09:17:45

Sep 17, 2019 - 9:18:50 AM
likes this

chuckv97

Canada

43546 posts since 10/5/2013

Yes David, we shall remain, toiling in anonymity

Sep 17, 2019 - 10:22:22 AM
likes this
Players Union Member

wizofos

USA

5206 posts since 8/19/2012

quote:
Originally posted by flyingsquirrelinlay

I watched it also and then a light bulb exploded in my head: this isn't about bluegrass, it is an examination of country music, which to be gentle, some of us don't listen to or respect. Speaking only for myself, expectations for something "serious" about bluegrass seems like the wish of a bastard son, hoping for affirmation/acceptance,  but never getting it.


As I recall the announcer last night said that tomorrow (Tuesday night) would be more about the development of bluegrass in the 1940's and 50's.  You may not listen to or respect 'country' music but some of the tunes predate bluegrass by several hundred years. Many of the songs  the Carter family sang had tunes and lyrics that were brought over with settlers that predated 1800.   A good example of bluegrass adapting an old time song was Bill Monroe recording Molly and Tenbrooks in 1949, that song had been recorded twice before and was dated back to the late 1800's.

Sep 17, 2019 - 11:12:14 AM

907 posts since 12/2/2013

Glen, thanks for the observation. I'll give the documentary another chance tonight. BTW, when I reference country music I am referring to the modern variety, not to what we used to proudly characterize as "folk" music, a genre generally disliked by some BHO members, but saved for posterity by Francis James Childe who collected early English ballads in the late-18 the century.

Sep 17, 2019 - 12:31:09 PM
Players Union Member

Tommy5

USA

3392 posts since 2/22/2009

The doc. is very interesting lots of new stuff. The Burns style is dramatic, but somehow the narrator noting that Rodgers sold a million records doesn’t have the power of like saying 22k Americans were killed or wounded at Antietam , or the union buried their dead in Mrs. Robert E. Lee’s rose garden so nobody would farm their anymore and the small cemetery grew to become the most hallowed ground in America - Arlington National Cemetery.

Edited by - Tommy5 on 09/17/2019 12:34:38

Sep 17, 2019 - 1:31:40 PM

907 posts since 12/2/2013

In the interest of accuracy, Child(e) collected his ballads in the mid-19th century. And I would be remiss if I didn't add that he was a graduate of Harvard College.

Sep 17, 2019 - 2:03:18 PM
likes this

Bill Rogers (Moderator)

USA

22320 posts since 6/25/2005

One of the problems I have with the series is the way it glossed over the Carters and Ralph Peer (among others) illegitimately claiming copyrights to traditional and public domain songs instead of properly claiming arrangement copyright. Part of the problem there is, of course, incompetent or lazy bureaucrats in the Copyright Office.

Edited by - Bill Rogers on 09/17/2019 14:20:34

Sep 17, 2019 - 3:04:57 PM

2609 posts since 7/28/2015

Most post-modern jazz got glossed over by the Ken Burns Jazz program and declared to be not jazz. Exactly one European got mentioned.

Sep 17, 2019 - 3:22:48 PM

3845 posts since 11/29/2005

Been enjoying it so far.

Here's an interesting review from Slate: slate.com/culture/2019/09/coun...=TheAngle

Sep 17, 2019 - 7:35:12 PM

dmiller

USA

23643 posts since 7/22/2007
Online Now

They did a decent job tonight, I thought.  At first I thought the Hank Williams emphasis was a bit too strong and exclusionary of others - - but then I realized the today (Sept. 17th) was Hank's birthday back in 1923.  Hmmm - - Coincidence, or a tribute?

Edited by - dmiller on 09/17/2019 19:35:58

Sep 17, 2019 - 9:33:19 PM
Players Union Member

Tommy5

USA

3392 posts since 2/22/2009

Yes, Eddy Arnold is given little time although he was just as popular as Williams at the time. But then Eddy’s story isn’t as interesting as the tragic artist story . I was surprised that they didn’t mention that originally the words to Hanks masterpiece was I’m so lonely ,I could die , not cry, but the record company thought that title was just too depressing .

Sep 18, 2019 - 5:42:50 AM
like this
Players Union Member

wizofos

USA

5206 posts since 8/19/2012

I think that the subject is so broad that they had to leave some things out. After all it is ONLY 16 hours on a subject that could be a lot more time. The producers also did not make this as a presentation for musicians or those that were interested in the specific subject of country music but were making a presentation that would appeal to the general public.
One thing I have noticed over the years is that there are geographical differences in how folk and country songs are played and adapted. There was one reference to his 3 finger style being common in his local his home area and how he brought that out to the rest of the world. In the following link John Hartford mentions that the 3 finger style might have been around from as early as 1840. Some interesting information in the following link with names of finger pickers who pre-dated Earl Scruggs. 

Anyway my point is that there is a limit to how much information you can put into a 16 hour TV presentation and the Ken Burns had to make some decisions what to include and what to leave out for a presentation that was being presented to the general public.
 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earl_Scruggs

Page: 1  2   3   Next Page   Last Page (3) 

Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.4238281