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Aug 18, 2019 - 3:37:59 PM
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2793 posts since 9/13/2018

Yuk. 20+ years ago we bought our house . During cleanup, I was moving a big pile of old rotted firewood. Unearthing a nest of these freaks. No bites or anything. ... but lots of scared. To not take any chances, I mowed the whole mess into teeny weeny snakes. Later I found out, they’re protected. I met with a DR guy, who said it’s one of many nest found around here! I havnt seen 1 since that day. Did have a couple cats just kinda drop dead throughout the years though. We have inside kitty’s now. If you ever see these, report them to game officials. They’ll take them away.




Aug 18, 2019 - 5:36:21 PM
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810 posts since 8/7/2017

Rattlesnakes are one of those animals it's hard for me to love. As a biologist, I respect their role in keeping rodent populations in check. As a walker and a pet owner I don't like them one bit. Nice to know your fish & game people will relocate them. While that solves the immediate problem, some snake nests have existed for hundred's of years, far as we know, so until the nest is utterly destroyed, the population will come back. The ancient nests are in rocky dens, so getting rid of the rotted wood nest will probably stop that source of rattlers.

Where we live, along the Gallatin River, is snake country...but I've not seen a rattler in 30 years of property ownership (garter snakes and bull snakes around the place make me jump, but I don't kill them).

Our house is 100 years old, next year, and I suspect a hundred years of human activity (farming&ranching) has wiped out rattlers locally. But drive 20 miles north, still ag country, and you can find them dead on the road. And 10 miles south you can find the rocky outcrops that make good snake dens.

Nice photos. I think my hands would be shaking too much to get a clear shot :-)

Edited by - BrooksMT on 08/18/2019 17:38:50

Aug 18, 2019 - 6:36:43 PM
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Brian T

Canada

15615 posts since 6/5/2008

I can't help but think = "hat band" , except I'm told that the color fades.

Hike with a straw broom. Snakes can't figure out how to kill a straw broom.

Aug 18, 2019 - 6:40:46 PM
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chuckv97

Canada

42750 posts since 10/5/2013

Lots of those along the Niagara Escarpment where I grew up. I’ve only ever seen a couple though. They’re small sized rattlers,, can’t do much serious harm.

https://youtu.be/PTr4Kb-TtGI

Edited by - chuckv97 on 08/18/2019 18:43:26

Aug 19, 2019 - 5:29:06 AM

5201 posts since 10/13/2007

The law says protected, but it is hard to protect them when they are in your backyard or near the trails you hike. And baby rattlesnake venom is a bit more poisonous than adults.
Ken

Aug 19, 2019 - 9:25:48 AM

2793 posts since 9/13/2018

Chuck, evidently their venom is like super potent. But they only inject a small amount at a time. Are you perhaps volunteering for a test?

Aug 19, 2019 - 9:37:44 AM

chuckv97

Canada

42750 posts since 10/5/2013

Did not know that about the Massassaugas,,, always heard they weren’t that dangerous.
Volunteer? Maybe in my next life.....

Aug 19, 2019 - 10:15:49 AM

3834 posts since 11/29/2005

Out here in the West (or Southwest), the lore is that baby rattlers don't have the control of the amount of venom they inject (it's a learned response), so you get the full dose. Not sure about the venom potency claim.

I grew up in the Kettleman Hills of the San Joaquin Valley in California and learned to respect rattlers at an early age (as a 3-year old, I showed my mother the "hoppy toads" on our patio - turned out to be a fresh batch of baby rattlers that I was poking with a short twig.).

Aug 19, 2019 - 10:32:43 AM
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8820 posts since 2/22/2007

"Protected"? I'll protect me and mine first. When I go into the woods or wilderness, then that is THEIR house, and I will try not to disturb. If camping, I will move. But my yard is MY house, and they will not be welcome. Same goes for any dangerous critter, with legs or without.

Aug 19, 2019 - 11:15:37 AM

1203 posts since 2/10/2013

Based on what I have read, the Massassauga rattler is smaller and less lethal than the diamondback rattler. I think I have also read that young rattlers are also lethal, but the the volume of venom happening during a snake bite is also determined by how recently the reptile has used his fangs.

Browsing informs me they elusive and shy. In addition Ontario Canada and Michigan have the largest number of massassauga rattlers. Only one or two bites are recorded each year. And as I wrote earlier, they are not nearly as dangerous as the southern diamond, copperhead, cottonmouth, etc.. I have lived in extreme northern New York and Michigan. I have never encountered a rattlesnake. A junk dealer in Grand Rapids Mi. got bit in his back yard several times. He was not fatally bitten. And, he was being very careless. Don't just stick your hand just anywhere.

Aug 19, 2019 - 12:52:20 PM
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2496 posts since 2/16/2017

My westie took a bite on the snout at the top of a mountain outside of Jim Thorpe, PA a couple summers ago. After a treacherous run straight down the mountain with the dog in my arms, and an even more treacherous 40 mile drive on backroads, and after an 1100 dollar stay at the animal hospital that had the antivenin, a very valuable lesson was learned by this owner (and hopefully the dog too).

It was a timber rattler that got him. They are common on all the ridges in this part of Appalachia, but thankfully pretty docile as far as rattlesnakes go (which is not really all that docile...)

Aug 19, 2019 - 1:46:19 PM

2793 posts since 9/13/2018

Jeff
Theres a group of guys around Pitt that go just about every year to Cambria co. To hunt them in the hills where the flat rocks are. They’re nuts. I’ve seen phone vids of them..... dude

Aug 19, 2019 - 2:09:55 PM
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Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

23196 posts since 8/3/2003

We have a "rattlesnake roundup" every year at a town about 100 miles from us. They round them up, show them off, get in the pen with them (dumb thing to do, if you ask me), and then kill them, fry them and sell the meat to help pay for the cost of putting on the show. This event has been going on for years and years and is well attended not only by rattlesnake hunters, but the general public. There's usually an arts and crafts show and several food fenders. It thins out the rattlesnake population which is very much needed in this part of the country.

Aug 19, 2019 - 2:46:36 PM

chuckv97

Canada

42750 posts since 10/5/2013

This must be the roundup you mentioned, Sherry ,,,,,,,,, wonder what it’s like to be Rattlesnake Queen....? youtu.be/MzjggRxVnNU

Edited by - chuckv97 on 08/19/2019 14:48:13

Aug 19, 2019 - 3:20:40 PM
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RV6

USA

1228 posts since 2/3/2012

quote:
Originally posted by Brian T

I can't help but think = "hat band" , except I'm told that the color fades.


The color does fade after 40 years or so.surprise

This is a hat band my snake hunting buddy made me.  Two little snakes on a piece of rein.  The rattle (now shown, broken in half) came off a much larger snake that I killed when I was checking windmills and water tanks.


 

Edited by - RV6 on 08/19/2019 15:23:00

Aug 19, 2019 - 4:01:19 PM

8885 posts since 1/15/2005

quote:
Originally posted by From Greylock to Bean Blossom

The law says protected, but it is hard to protect them when they are in your backyard or near the trails you hike. And baby rattlesnake venom is a bit more poisonous than adults.
Ken


Ken, I have heard that immature (baby) venomous snakes are more dangerous as they don't know how to control the amount of venom when they bite, not that the venom is more toxic.  I have heard that, but it (or me) could be wrong!

Aug 19, 2019 - 5:52:25 PM
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14259 posts since 12/2/2005
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by chuckv97

This must be the roundup you mentioned, Sherry ,,,,,,,,, wonder what it’s like to be Rattlesnake Queen....?


I'm more wondering what it would be like to DATE the Rattlesnake Queen. Fiercest woman I ever dated was from Texas, and she hated snakes.

Aug 19, 2019 - 6:38:33 PM
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5201 posts since 10/13/2007

quote:
Originally posted by yeoldbanjoguy

Jeff
Theres a group of guys around Pitt that go just about every year to Cambria co. To hunt them in the hills where the flat rocks are. They’re nuts. I’ve seen phone vids of them..... dude


My grand dad used to hunt them in Butler County Pa with a forked stick & high boots. Yikes.

ken

Aug 20, 2019 - 5:06:38 PM
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mander

USA

3720 posts since 10/7/2007

There is a woman in Africa who loves black mamba snakes. She doesn't touch them, she gets her husband to capture them and transport them and release them in the wild. There's stupid, and then there is insane. It would be one thing if the wild NEEDED more black mamba snakes, but they don't. Snake mass reproduce. They don't need our help. And they probably don't want the competition. But what bothers me the most is her pushing her husband into doing it for her. Wrong. Wrong. Wrong.

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