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Jul 30, 2019 - 5:44:40 AM
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304 posts since 3/26/2009

My dad was upgrading and no longer had room for this beauty in his shop and he gave it to me. I had access to it and a bigger one in his shop already but now I'll be able to leave it set up for ongoing projects and what not. Isn't she pretty? LOL

It has a 12 inch throw and a 5 foot bed.  

Jul 30, 2019 - 6:36:34 AM
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1301 posts since 10/5/2006

Looks like an old Clausing. Beautiful! Nice tool.

Jul 30, 2019 - 6:40:26 AM
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Players Union Member

rudy

USA

14490 posts since 3/27/2004

The best kind of screw cutter.  Big enough to be useful and light enough that it doesn't require blocking and rigging to move!

Jul 30, 2019 - 8:11:52 AM
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12157 posts since 6/29/2005

It's a beauty!

Jul 31, 2019 - 2:07:35 PM

Fathand

Canada

11463 posts since 2/7/2008

quote:
Originally posted by Oldtwanger

Looks like an old Clausing. Beautiful! Nice tool.


I was going to guess Atlas/ Craftsman?

Jul 31, 2019 - 4:56:24 PM
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1301 posts since 10/5/2006

Lots of 1944 Clausing lathe information:

http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/detail.aspx?id=19870

Select 'view pdf'

Aug 1, 2019 - 6:31:01 AM
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304 posts since 3/26/2009

quote:
Originally posted by Oldtwanger

Lots of 1944 Clausing lathe information:

http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/detail.aspx?id=19870

Select 'view pdf'


 

Thanks fror the 1944 PDF!   Be nice if I could order from that catalog at those prices..   The most info I found was on this page.   http://www.lathes.co.uk/clausing/page6.html    I think it is a 100 MK3 or a 100 MK3a from what I see there.  Would put it somewhere from 1945 to 1960.  After doing a little research I need to look it over a little closer for a model number but I keep getting side tracked.   It says Clausing on the gearbox and Atlas on the gear ratio chart.

Dad bought this thing in the early '80s.  I think he paid about $800 for it then.  He taught welding and machine shop at the local Vo-Tech High school for 30 years.  He did some part time work at a local machine shop shop summers.  They would sub him out some small jobs during the school year he would work on in the basement.   

He has been retired for 14 years now and has added on to his home shop twice.  It is absolutely buried in machine equipment.  Apparently the pre-CNC stuff is dirt cheap right now and he can't help himself.  There is already a "new" lathe set up where this one was.  The lathe count is still at 4 in his shop.  3 mills, Surface grinder, 2 cut off saws,  3 drill presses..  He even has a punch press sitting outside.  I don't even know.   He runs a big rotary 3 phase converter he built himself out of 2 motors.  His "big" lathe has a 16 foot bed. 

He isn't open for business or anything, he just always has a personal project going or helping out a friend with something.   It is nice to have access. 

We were packing up the stuff that only fits this one and couldn't find the base plate for a boring bar setup.   He is going to "whip one out" when he gets a minute...

Edited by - steveh_2o on 08/01/2019 06:38:51

Aug 1, 2019 - 8:08:17 AM
Players Union Member

rudy

USA

14490 posts since 3/27/2004

quote:
Originally posted by steveh_2o
quote:
Originally posted by Oldtwanger

Lots of 1944 Clausing lathe information:

http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/detail.aspx?id=19870

Select 'view pdf'


 

Thanks fror the 1944 PDF!   Be nice if I could order from that catalog at those prices..   The most info I found was on this page.   http://www.lathes.co.uk/clausing/page6.html    I think it is a 100 MK3 or a 100 MK3a from what I see there.  Would put it somewhere from 1945 to 1960.  After doing a little research I need to look it over a little closer for a model number but I keep getting side tracked.   It says Clausing on the gearbox and Atlas on the gear ratio chart.

Dad bought this thing in the early '80s.  I think he paid about $800 for it then.  He taught welding and machine shop at the local Vo-Tech High school for 30 years.  He did some part time work at a local machine shop shop summers.  They would sub him out some small jobs during the school year he would work on in the basement.   

He has been retired for 14 years now and has added on to his home shop twice.  It is absolutely buried in machine equipment.  Apparently the pre-CNC stuff is dirt cheap right now and he can't help himself.  There is already a "new" lathe set up where this one was.  The lathe count is still at 4 in his shop.  3 mills, Surface grinder, 2 cut off saws,  3 drill presses..  He even has a punch press sitting outside.  I don't even know.   He runs a big rotary 3 phase converter he built himself out of 2 motors.  His "big" lathe has a 16 foot bed. 

He isn't open for business or anything, he just always has a personal project going or helping out a friend with something.   It is nice to have access. 

We were packing up the stuff that only fits this one and couldn't find the base plate for a boring bar setup.   He is going to "whip one out" when he gets a minute...


The nice thing about all the surplus 3 phase stuff is there are now inexpensive single to three phase electronic converters widely available.  The even better part of the new converters is they have built in variable speed so you can lower the rpm down to about 30% of base motor speed.

The three phase motors that are on the industrial variety equipment are easy to work on and seldom require anything more than a quick bearing change or tightening up the bearing housing bores.  I used to do 3 phase motor rebuilds including winding new coils and all the coil interconnections, and it's all pretty easy if you have the equipment to do it.

Edited by - rudy on 08/01/2019 08:10:08

Aug 1, 2019 - 8:28:05 AM

304 posts since 3/26/2009

quote:
Originally posted by rudy
quote:
Originally posted by steveh_2o
quote:
Originally posted by Oldtwanger

Lots of 1944 Clausing lathe information:

http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/detail.aspx?id=19870

Select 'view pdf'


 

Thanks fror the 1944 PDF!   Be nice if I could order from that catalog at those prices..   The most info I found was on this page.   http://www.lathes.co.uk/clausing/page6.html    I think it is a 100 MK3 or a 100 MK3a from what I see there.  Would put it somewhere from 1945 to 1960.  After doing a little research I need to look it over a little closer for a model number but I keep getting side tracked.   It says Clausing on the gearbox and Atlas on the gear ratio chart.

Dad bought this thing in the early '80s.  I think he paid about $800 for it then.  He taught welding and machine shop at the local Vo-Tech High school for 30 years.  He did some part time work at a local machine shop shop summers.  They would sub him out some small jobs during the school year he would work on in the basement.   

He has been retired for 14 years now and has added on to his home shop twice.  It is absolutely buried in machine equipment.  Apparently the pre-CNC stuff is dirt cheap right now and he can't help himself.  There is already a "new" lathe set up where this one was.  The lathe count is still at 4 in his shop.  3 mills, Surface grinder, 2 cut off saws,  3 drill presses..  He even has a punch press sitting outside.  I don't even know.   He runs a big rotary 3 phase converter he built himself out of 2 motors.  His "big" lathe has a 16 foot bed. 

He isn't open for business or anything, he just always has a personal project going or helping out a friend with something.   It is nice to have access. 

We were packing up the stuff that only fits this one and couldn't find the base plate for a boring bar setup.   He is going to "whip one out" when he gets a minute...


The nice thing about all the surplus 3 phase stuff is there are now inexpensive single to three phase electronic converters widely available.  The even better part of the new converters is they have built in variable speed so you can lower the rpm down to about 30% of base motor speed.

The three phase motors that are on the industrial variety equipment are easy to work on and seldom require anything more than a quick bearing change or tightening up the bearing housing bores.  I used to do 3 phase motor rebuilds including winding new coils and all the coil interconnections, and it's all pretty easy if you have the equipment to do it.

 

Thanks, I'll have to show him that.  I'm not sure he is aware.   He built the rotary converter out of a 10HP motor.  The "new" lathe has a 7HP motor.  He says that he is right on the edge of overloading the converter.  A little quick web search shows a digital one barely big enough to pull it for $275.  

Aug 1, 2019 - 9:54:25 AM
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1843 posts since 1/16/2010

That is AWESOME! Happy/jealous for you! I'd love to have something like that in my garage.

Years ago when I was in the Navy, they sent me to school learn how to operate a lathe...they were old Southbend belt drive lathes....pretty cool.

Congrats on you new acquisition.

Dow

Aug 2, 2019 - 8:01:34 AM

1301 posts since 10/5/2006

Years ago I bought a well-used South Bend 10K.
Much work later - my pride and joy!


Aug 2, 2019 - 8:20:17 AM

304 posts since 3/26/2009

quote:
Originally posted by Oldtwanger

Years ago I bought a well-used South Bend 10K.
Much work later - my pride and joy!


Wow!  One of these days maybe I'l get around to polishing this one.   

One of Dad's is a South Bend.  Not sure about the model but considerably bigger than the one he gave me.   I think he said it would handle a 13 inch diameter.  It would have been bought new about 1976 when they were setting up the Vocational school he worked at.   He bought it on a sealed bid a few years ago when they needed the space to modernize.  

Aug 2, 2019 - 1:07:52 PM

79 posts since 7/6/2019

Machinery can mangle you in a fraction of a second so be safe. Lathes in particular can lull you into a false sense of security. Just saying. I saw a 350lb cast iron drum come out of a lathe chuck once. It blew the safety door clean off a 30" chuck Giddings & Lewis and nearly squashed the operator.

Aug 2, 2019 - 2:04:32 PM
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304 posts since 3/26/2009

quote:
Originally posted by Coolidge

Machinery can mangle you in a fraction of a second so be safe. Lathes in particular can lull you into a false sense of security. Just saying. I saw a 350lb cast iron drum come out of a lathe chuck once. It blew the safety door clean off a 30" chuck Giddings & Lewis and nearly squashed the operator.


Yes, I agree.  I may hurt myself, but if I do it won't be from not knowing better.  Dad, being a high school machine shop teacher, has always been tough about that.  I'm almost 50 years old and I am pavlovian conditioned to the point I can't take my hand off the chuck key with it in the chuck.

Dad made it 30 years without having a major injury in his shop.  A few cuts, bruises and burns, but everyone made it through with all their fingers and teeth.   He always says that if he'd had the injuries in 30 years  the football team has in one season they would have shut him down.  He had a few close calls.  Once a kid got his shirt twisted in one of the lathes and got it ripped off.  Big muscle bound kid braced himself and didn't get pulled in.

We all need a safety reminder now and then.  Hopefully not a physical one.  I'm already not that great of a banjo player, I need all these fingers!

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