Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

184
Banjo Lovers Online


Want to hide these Google ads? Join the Players Union!

Page: 1  2   Last Page (2) 

Jul 21, 2019 - 2:33:22 PM

mander

USA

3639 posts since 10/7/2007

For the most part, I don't mind being short. But this house drives me nuts. All the odd angles, odd stairs, plants against the house, steep slopes away from and towards the house, etc. There is no way to put a ladder against the wall to drill a hole and hang a planter. And I ain't cute enough to get the men around here to do it for me. Manly men don't care about planters, or so I'm told.

I'm tempted to buy some scaffolding. It seems spendy just to drill a few holes, but cheaper than a hospital stay.

Anybody here have experience with scaffolding? Any recommendations?

Jul 21, 2019 - 3:07:54 PM
likes this

Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

23045 posts since 8/3/2003

Dave was a safety engineer and knew lots about scaffolding. In fact, he brought some home (bought and brought) and we used it when we were painting the windows and the eaves of the house. If properly installed, it's sturdy and very useful. I've probably still got some of it hidden around here somewhere.

Dave never minded drilling/hammering holes for planters or pictures or whatever I wanted to hang. He always thought it made the place look better. Guess I was lucky. He put hangers on the front of his shop so I could hang baskets of flowers and we could look at them while sitting on the patio. He also made flowerbeds and loosened up the soil so we could plant flowers. Some men are macho enough to be able to enjoy the beauty of nature.

Jul 21, 2019 - 3:15:04 PM

donc

Canada

5908 posts since 2/9/2010

We have places nearby that rent scaffolding . Buying it would be more expensive than hiring a painter for a day or two. They deliver it to your front yard and pick it up when you are finished.

Jul 21, 2019 - 4:10:06 PM
likes this

678 posts since 11/17/2018

Two Little Giant ladders and the Plank...

amazon.com/Little-Giant-Multi-...00E1AQE46

Best ladder for the money I've ever owned.

Edited by - OldNavyGuy on 07/21/2019 16:13:16

Jul 21, 2019 - 4:19:04 PM

2214 posts since 9/12/2016

Would really have to see this to give an opinion,but I am retired from construction work.

Jul 21, 2019 - 4:42:57 PM
Players Union Member

rinemb

USA

11447 posts since 5/24/2005

I have raised quite a bit of scaffolding and brought it down. Your yard may be awkward to roll it around . My first experience was being high on a scaffold, roped up a a big power washer I had never used, and pulled the trigger. Thankfully I was tethered to a big rope. It would have knocked me off. Don't climb those things with stuff in your hands.
You can rent simple to operate small lifts as needed, caution and research! Brad

Jul 21, 2019 - 5:17:06 PM
likes this

51952 posts since 12/14/2005

Drywaller stilts???

Jul 21, 2019 - 5:17:49 PM
likes this

Owen

Canada

3710 posts since 6/5/2011

Like Tom, I'd have to see it.... but I think I be considering the number of holes as well.  If  the number is small....  well, I've heard that "there's more ways to kill a cat than choking it with butter."

Jul 21, 2019 - 5:30:56 PM

2214 posts since 9/12/2016

A lot of newbies when setting up a latter build up under the feet to make things even. To me It has been much safer on uneven ground to excavate to get the 2 or 4 feet seated. Setting up a ladder is not to be looked at lightly. I set them up good and warning take your reading glasses off, before you start down.
I did buy enough scaffold bucks to work on my barn 6 feet at a time. 20 feet tall .They don't roll ,they build up on leveling feet then stack 5 feet at a time .

Jul 21, 2019 - 8:30:37 PM

mander

USA

3639 posts since 10/7/2007

quote:
Originally posted by mike gregory

Drywaller stilts???

 


Cleaver, but surprisingly expensive. They top out at 30" and I'm looking at the four to five foot range. Thanks!

Jul 21, 2019 - 9:12:11 PM

2214 posts since 9/12/2016

quote:
Originally posted by mander
quote:
Originally posted by mike gregory

Drywaller stilts???

 


Cleaver, but surprisingly expensive. They top out at 30" and I'm looking at the four to five foot range. Thanks!


I never saw those drywall stilts used  outside

Jul 22, 2019 - 3:50:06 AM

RonR

USA

1472 posts since 11/29/2012

Two extension ladders, a set of ladder jacks and a pick or plank always got me where I had to go . Make sure you chose a plank that's not too heavy or not too small. Lots of accidents have happened with this setup to other people. Working from a plank is not for everyone.

Jul 22, 2019 - 5:06:43 AM

2214 posts since 9/12/2016

You got to be more fit than me ,to climb up onto that plank Ron, but yes a great set up. Make sure those ladders are set good.
There is too much of me for the drywall stilts also.

Jul 22, 2019 - 5:19:24 AM

2321 posts since 10/9/2011

quote:
Originally posted by OldNavyGuy

Two Little Giant ladders and the Plank...

amazon.com/Little-Giant-Multi-...00E1AQE46

Best ladder for the money I've ever owned.


I bought one of those after a stupidity induced fall from a conventional step ladder. The one I got is (I think) 17' and for our one story ranch house it will reach anywhere I have to go with great stability. They're not cheap, and I bought only one but I can't imagine many tasks I couldn't do with the one ladder. I'd recommend one of these to anyone.

Jul 22, 2019 - 5:30:53 AM

2214 posts since 9/12/2016

after years of job building scaffolds around the mini farm ,I bought five of these with feet and boards, around a thousand dollars i think.Money well spent in my situation.

3 boards and 6 feet gives me the setups I need


 

Edited by - Tractor1 on 07/22/2019 05:32:25

Jul 22, 2019 - 6:22:06 AM
Players Union Member

rinemb

USA

11447 posts since 5/24/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Tractor1

after years of job building scaffolds around the mini farm ,I bought five of these with feet and boards, around a thousand dollars i think.Money well spent in my situation.

3 boards and 6 feet gives me the setups I need


I like that, however at my age I would want to also attach a railing on top, which I am sure is available for that rig?  But that scaffold looks a lot easier and lighter than the old stuff I moved around.  I like it.  Brad

Edited by - rinemb on 07/22/2019 06:22:19

Jul 22, 2019 - 6:28:59 AM

2214 posts since 9/12/2016

Yeh it is a bit lighter,I keep it out of the weather.

Jul 22, 2019 - 11:15:25 AM
Players Union Member

heavy5

USA

909 posts since 11/3/2016

Mander , What exactly are you hoping to hang from the outside of your house --- height , size , weight , etc ? just approximates
Bob

Jul 22, 2019 - 12:20:12 PM

Tobus

USA

1901 posts since 11/17/2015

I have 6 scaffold frames and some X-braces that I use fairly frequently to reach my second-story windows and such. It's the usual type of masonry scaffold that you see on jobsites. Being an engineer for a construction company, I design shoring scaffold on a daily basis, but that's a much heavier type of scaffold that's designed to carry concrete loads and not just worker loads.

Anyway, a light mobile scaffold tower can be a very safe way to do your work. But only if it's erected and used properly. Just like a ladder, it can lead to injury and/or death if used improperly. If you're going to use scaffold to do your work, please, do it properly. One of the most common amateur mistakes is using improper lumber for walk planks.

Jul 22, 2019 - 2:21:47 PM

2214 posts since 9/12/2016

Mason scaffold is sometimes in a pattern to walk thru instead of having rungs

Jul 23, 2019 - 2:15:14 PM

3101 posts since 12/6/2009

They have scaffolds called bakers scaffolds. Like 3 feet by 6 feet. (2 sections) would get you up 8 to 10 feet safely I wouldn’t recommend any higher. They’re light and easy to assemble. You can rent them most any-where they rent stuff.

homedepot.com/p/PRO-SERIES-6-f...100645165

I lived on those stilts when I worked as an electrician....I used them indoors and outside....I got so I could climb ladders and bend down and pick small things off the floor. I used them mainly for installing heat cables but then found you could drill and pull wire make up ceiling boxes hang light fixtures etc etc. a friend used to borrowed them for halloween to make himself up in a tall monster costume ....anyway good lucjk with your project.

Jul 23, 2019 - 6:36:10 PM
likes this
Players Union Member

grandpafive

Canada

299 posts since 8/30/2014

I remember going to a service station one day in Mississauga and there were two men working on a scaffold doing some sort of repair on the canopy over the gas pumps. The lot sloped slightly and they had a pile of 2 X 8 offcuts ( 4 or 5) under the downside legs to make them level. They were also smoking and dropping their butts when they got to short to smoke. I took pictues and sent them to our safety supervior at work.

Jul 24, 2019 - 7:43:46 AM
like this
Players Union Member

heavy5

USA

909 posts since 11/3/2016

Mander , Forgetting all of this scaffolding , you can always get a couple of these babies to toss on the roof & hang whatever .
amazon.com/Rampant-SPGHOOK-Gra...ay&sr=8-5

Jul 24, 2019 - 11:13:11 AM

Tobus

USA

1901 posts since 11/17/2015

quote:
Originally posted by grandpafive

The lot sloped slightly and they had a pile of 2 X 8 offcuts ( 4 or 5) under the downside legs to make them level.


The guys on my jobsites routinely stack mud pads (these are 16"x16" squares of plywood, three sheets thick) in order to get scaffold to a somewhat level base, or to reach a height that the scaffold or shoring won't otherwise reach.  I'll usually allow stacking up to around 18" tall, but beyond that, stability can be a real concern.  Especially when it's on an uneven or uncompacted surface below, with 8,000 lb. loads on the shoring and men working on top of the deck.

It just amazes me that some people will do things like this and then look at it and say, "Yeah, looks good to me!".  Especially when lives are at stake.

Edited by - Tobus on 07/24/2019 11:13:35

Jul 24, 2019 - 12:32:23 PM

2214 posts since 9/12/2016

quote:
Originally posted by Tobus
quote:
Originally posted by grandpafive

The lot sloped slightly and they had a pile of 2 X 8 offcuts ( 4 or 5) under the downside legs to make them level.


The guys on my jobsites routinely stack mud pads (these are 16"x16" squares of plywood, three sheets thick) in order to get scaffold to a somewhat level base, or to reach a height that the scaffold or shoring won't otherwise reach.  I'll usually allow stacking up to around 18" tall, but beyond that, stability can be a real concern.  Especially when it's on an uneven or uncompacted surface below, with 8,000 lb. loads on the shoring and men working on top of the deck.

It just amazes me that some people will do things like this and then look at it and say, "Yeah, looks good to me!".  Especially when lives are at stake.


I hope those are reshores ha ha ,the kind of workers I was blessed with

Jul 24, 2019 - 6:53:51 PM

mander

USA

3639 posts since 10/7/2007

quote:
Originally posted by Tobus

I have 6 scaffold frames and some X-braces that I use fairly frequently to reach my second-story windows and such. It's the usual type of masonry scaffold that you see on jobsites. Being an engineer for a construction company, I design shoring scaffold on a daily basis, but that's a much heavier type of scaffold that's designed to carry concrete loads and not just worker loads.

Anyway, a light mobile scaffold tower can be a very safe way to do your work. But only if it's erected and used properly. Just like a ladder, it can lead to injury and/or death if used improperly. If you're going to use scaffold to do your work, please, do it properly. One of the most common amateur mistakes is using improper lumber for walk planks.


The entrance to my house is kaddywoppus. Add to that, the pond, and the down spouts and the plants. It is not possible to put a ready made archway trellis in front of the door to grow vines. The custom made one was estimated at $1000. The entrance is "L" shaped. I decided if I attached plant hangers, I could zip tie sticks to them and make a roof/awning. I actually did the first half of that today. If I saw my children using a makeshift scaffold like the one I used today, their ears would catch fire. Luckily, no one saw me do it.  I made a scaffold with a step stool, a one inch  by three feet by six foot plank, and a ton of big books. Thankfully, I stood at the strongest points, and didn't need to stand in the middle, or I wouldn't have done it. 

I still should look at scaffolding. There's a job I want done, and it's like trying to put a ladder on a ball. A big ball, but a ball on the same. Not a flat surface around.

Page: 1  2   Last Page (2) 

Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.375