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Jul 15, 2019 - 2:47:34 PM
896 posts since 4/13/2017

Ken LeVan Dan Drabek rudy Helix1 I'm tagging y'all cuz your the ones who have gave me the most ideas...

Would there be a problem if I used my jigsaw to cut the outer corners and inner flats off my block pot layers? I have an old head that I can use to trace a bigger-than-11"-circle to follow, and I'm sure I can find something that's smaller-than-9.5" to trace for the inner part. I really just want to trim all of that off so I can prepare it for the routing to get the actual size.

When I try to push the jigsaw, the bottom of the blade likes to wander a little, but not only are the cuts I want to make shallow, but I know better than to push it now on things I want to be square.

Jul 15, 2019 - 2:58:39 PM
Players Union Member

Helix1

USA

330 posts since 4/17/2019

Or a compound radius miter saw
Jigsaw is just fine
XNG. Jerry Rabun is a member here
He cut his off that way with the radial
You can turn the blade around backwards and clamp the jigsaw in the vise if you want to

Jul 15, 2019 - 5:02:01 PM
like this

beegee

USA

21277 posts since 7/6/2005

Bandsaw would be my choice. A jigsaw blade can often not cut perpendicular as the blade is flexible and tends to wander in thick cuts

Jul 15, 2019 - 5:14:31 PM
Players Union Member

Helix1

USA

330 posts since 4/17/2019

No kidding, it’s what he asked, Ive done it while my bandsaw was waiting for parts
Leave some trim

Jerry rabun did his to within .001 with a 50 grit belt sander, clamping in the vise and using the belt like a shoeshine rag
I don’t think the OP has many tools

make your self a compass out of scrap to get your 9.5” circle

keep gong

Edited by - Helix1 on 07/15/2019 17:17:51

Jul 15, 2019 - 7:03:48 PM

896 posts since 4/13/2017

quote:
Originally posted by Helix1

No kidding, it’s what he asked, Ive done it while my bandsaw was waiting for parts
Leave some trim

Jerry rabun did his to within .001 with a 50 grit belt sander, clamping in the vise and using the belt like a shoeshine rag
I don’t think the OP has many tools

make your self a compass out of scrap to get your 9.5” circle

keep gong


Right, I don't have many fancy tools. The only fancy tools I have are a 10" miter saw and a table saw. The rest are common hand tools, like drills, jigsaws, circular saws, vibrating sander, and a dremel.

Jul 15, 2019 - 8:36:54 PM
Players Union Member

Helix1

USA

330 posts since 4/17/2019

When I first started ten years ago, I learned as many hand processes as I could, including hogging a neck in a couple of minutes.i have a Farrier’s rasp for hooves

 I couldn’t get next to running  a router duplicator. I wanted to “touch “ the wood
I learned so much the first year, that knowledge has served me very well ever since
No spokeshave, rasps
I use water borne lacquer,
One of these days I’m going to spit shine a rim and neck with French Polish
Dive, dive get in there

Edited by - Helix1 on 07/15/2019 20:40:17

Jul 15, 2019 - 8:40:43 PM

917 posts since 1/26/2012

Don't use the jig saw by making the cuts in the direction of the circle of the rim, but rather from the top to the bottom, and you shouldn't have any major problems.

Jul 16, 2019 - 7:18:54 AM
likes this

3516 posts since 5/12/2010

On my first one I used a hand saw and rasp to rough it out, then trued it up on a sort of lathe thing a buddy of mine had built using a washing machine motor. It turned out okay, but I don't want to go through that again.

Often we are limited to using what we have, and while a Jig Saw would work, I think I would rather use the miter saw or table saw instead. You can make a "turntable" jig out of plywood and set it up so that the rim rotates into the blade. Randy / Rudy showed how to build a similar jig to use with a sander.

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