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Jun 18, 2019 - 3:27:21 AM
1803 posts since 2/7/2008

I discovered that the neck on my latest build isn’t quite a straight taper on the treble side.

Can I sand that edge on a belt sander with the frets in place? I’m imagining that heat could be a problem, but I’m sure someone has tried this with good or bad results and can share their wisdom.

Jun 18, 2019 - 4:55:40 AM

28 posts since 3/8/2018

how much would you need to remove a belt sander removes wood pretty fast. I'm not sure I would try that I would take a 8" straight block with 120 grit sand paper and sand slowly I think if it is a small amount I would try to see if I could get close with out removing too much. I am assuming the neck is almost ready for finish you will also have to refinish the frets  this is just my opinion I work allot with wood but have only 2 banjo builds completed so far.sure others can provide more help
don

Edited by - fairlane64 on 06/18/2019 04:58:35

Jun 18, 2019 - 5:05:44 AM
likes this

11848 posts since 6/29/2005

It depends on several things, the most important of which is how tightly the frets are seated in the slots.

The heat won't cause any problem but the sander could tear the fret ends out if they are not tightly seated.

I always dress and square the edges of fretted fingerboards and bevel the fret ends before doing the bindings, and there is no problem with heat coming from the sander, but as I said before, if the frets are not tightly seated, some of them could pull up.

Edited by - Ken LeVan on 06/18/2019 05:06:33

Jun 18, 2019 - 5:45:21 AM
Players Union Member

rudy

USA

14122 posts since 3/27/2004

quote:
Originally posted by Quickstep192

I discovered that the neck on my latest build isn’t quite a straight taper on the treble side.

Can I sand that edge on a belt sander with the frets in place? I’m imagining that heat could be a problem, but I’m sure someone has tried this with good or bad results and can share their wisdom.


Yes, just take enough time to prevent overheating the frets as you sand to your desired profile.  If your frets are installed correctly there's little chance of loosening them when you sand the edge.  Sand the neck lengthways for the best results of ending up with a nice, straight, and uniform edge.  The one thing you need to be very careful not to do is sand in a way that would tend to pull frets out of the slots.

I've done instrument conversions by changing the neck profile using that technique and had no problems.  I recently re-shaped a Taylor GS Mini neck to be narrower for conversion into an octave mandolin, and here's a detailed photo journal of converting a mini-Strat to an electric octave mandolin.  The third photo shows the neck after re-profiling and describes the process.

Mini electric guitar to octave mandolin conversion

Edited by - rudy on 06/18/2019 05:47:14

Jun 18, 2019 - 5:50:54 AM

1803 posts since 2/7/2008

Unfortunately, the neck is already finished, but since it was finished with Osmo hard oil, so hopefully it’s easily repaired.

Great point on ripping out the frets. I’ll need to exercise some care there.

Jun 18, 2019 - 6:51:48 AM

11848 posts since 6/29/2005

probably the safest way would be with a wide file, or what you would use to dress and level the frets.

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