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Jun 17, 2019 - 4:13:01 PM
Players Union Member

rvrose

USA

689 posts since 6/29/2007

Currently our band has a Peavey 100w powered amp and 2 passive speakers. The system is heavy and bulky and we avoid using it just because of the size and weight. We have a new lightweight wireless mixer that I would like to just run to a couple lighter powered speakers and eliminate the powered amp. Does anyone have experience and recommendations for decent sounding powered speakers? Thanks.

Rick

Edited by - Texasbanjo on 06/18/2019 04:38:19

Jun 17, 2019 - 6:41:29 PM
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14303 posts since 12/2/2005

How much money ya got? It matters.

QSC is great stuff, but it's pricey. Mackie Thump series is IMO the best bet for keeping the dollars down.

You should expect to see this thread moved to the "Live Sound, Recording and Electronics" forum. While you're there, take a look at the PA 101 sticky at the top.

Jun 18, 2019 - 3:52:06 AM

1339 posts since 2/12/2009

cant go wrong with EV in my experience .

Jun 18, 2019 - 5:42:27 AM

2453 posts since 4/19/2008

I vote for the original Mackie 450's with the blue emblems, the newest of that brand go down hill. They haven't made them in years so if you can find a pair that works they will probably work forever.

for example

guitarcenter.com/Used/Mackie/S...LNk_D_BwE

Jun 18, 2019 - 12:59:56 PM

10122 posts since 6/2/2008

Look into a Fishman SA330x or any of the other "line array" speaker systems, some of which include bass modules.  If you're currently doing fine with a 100-watt system, any of these should be adeqaute to your needs.

You can run your mixer into these systems, though I don't know about doing it wirelessly. Point is, since you'll use an external mixer, the small number of inputs on all versions of line arrays is no limitation.

I've played with a pair of the Fishmans twice. The owners had just obtained them, so there was lots they didn't know. They sounded good, but did not have wide enough dispersion to serve as both front of house and monitor as the owners had hoped.  Performance space was cramped and we had too many musicians for the space.

Typically, my band plays with a bulky sound system like yours: Two 300-watt Peavery heads (one each for mains and monitors), Behringer mixer, two Peavey 12-inch plastic cabinet passive speakers, four Fender 1270 floor monitors.  I would love to get rid of the powered heads and passive speakers and go with a Bose L1, JBL Eon, Harbinger, Gemini or Maui, but my band isn't playing enough to justify the investment.  

Jun 18, 2019 - 9:39:21 PM
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3353 posts since 10/10/2008

quote:
Originally posted by mmuussiiccaall

I vote for the original Mackie 450's with the blue emblems, the newest of that brand go down hill. They haven't made them in years so if you can find a pair that works they will probably work forever.

for example

guitarcenter.com/Used/Mackie/S...LNk_D_BwE


Yep Rick ... been using these for years and they are awesome ... 

Jun 27, 2019 - 8:26:40 PM

602 posts since 12/17/2008

I really like my QSC CP-8. Great sound, good price, pretty light and fairly small.

Jun 27, 2019 - 9:17:30 PM

2453 posts since 4/19/2008

Another option, $250-$350 used, 50 pounds each, audiophile non-colored, full spectrum sound quality ( Can ya' tell I love these? )

cerwinvega.com/pro-audio/power...a-28.html

Sep 21, 2019 - 1:36:04 PM
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Players Union Member

rvrose

USA

689 posts since 6/29/2007

I hunted for a deal on used powered speakers based on your comments. I ended up with a great deal on a couple Mackie Thump 15s. I did some testing and they sound great, are light weight, and smaller than our old Peavey passives. Since we use condenser mics I was worried that I might get more feedback off the back of the plastic enclosure (vs the peaveys wooden), but not so! I set them up in an empty Church auditorium (~200 cap) and tweaked the equalizer a bit to kill the feedback and they did great. I was impressed. We will have first gig which is outside on Sept 28th, so we'll see how they do in an actual gig. Stay tuned...

Sep 21, 2019 - 2:35:35 PM
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14303 posts since 12/2/2005

quote:
Originally posted by rvrose

I hunted for a deal on used powered speakers based on your comments. I ended up with a great deal on a couple Mackie Thump 15s. I did some testing and they sound great, are light weight, and smaller than our old Peavey passives. Since we use condenser mics I was worried that I might get more feedback off the back of the plastic enclosure (vs the peaveys wooden), but not so! I set them up in an empty Church auditorium (~200 cap) and tweaked the equalizer a bit to kill the feedback and they did great. I was impressed. We will have first gig which is outside on Sept 28th, so we'll see how they do in an actual gig. Stay tuned...


Congrats! Outdoors it probably won't matter, but for indoor stuff look into a DBX Driverack for automatically setting EQ and feedback suppression. I bought mine new about seven years ago for $300. You might be able to pick one up used for half that - or less.

Oct 3, 2019 - 5:21:26 AM

2499 posts since 12/4/2009

Hello,

I guess one item that seems to be missing is audience size. I like the way Bose sets the bar on crowd size reach with their products. We could use the Watts per people density to gage the performance of these recommended products.

I stepped into Bose L1 to address my daughter’s wedding reception needs. The weight and tear down make it a good 100 people capacity use. Use two and the range is 200, but packed in a specific configuration.

Distance upfront and the outer reach are the other requirements. Over peoples head is optimal. Not every gig is optimal.

Noam Pickelny played solo in and L shaped building. He was having to divvy up his audience 50/50. His sound could not be 50/50. Some items to consider.

Oct 3, 2019 - 5:45:31 AM

52338 posts since 12/14/2005

quote:
Originally posted by rvrose

I hunted for a deal on used powered speakers based on your comments. I ended up with a great deal on a couple Mackie Thump 15s. I did some testing and they sound great, are light weight, and smaller than our old Peavey passives. Since we use condenser mics I was worried that I might get more feedback off the back of the plastic enclosure (vs the peaveys wooden), but not so! I set them up in an empty Church auditorium (~200 cap) and tweaked the equalizer a bit to kill the feedback and they did great. I was impressed. We will have first gig which is outside on Sept 28th, so we'll see how they do in an actual gig. Stay tuned...


i'm staying tuned.

How did it go?

Oct 3, 2019 - 8:55:56 AM
Players Union Member

rvrose

USA

689 posts since 6/29/2007

Thanks for asking Mike. We had an outside gig last Saturday and I used the Thumps for the first time in public with the full band. Overall they worked great. I did need to tweak one channel to add a low cutoff as I was getting a real low feedback (which I had never had on the old Peaveys). I think it was because the 15" Thumps have more low-end than our old system, thus the feedback. Once I added the cutoff on the voice channel it worked beautifully. We have a Behringer XR16 wireless mixer we use to drive them. I love the lighter weight and losing the heavy powered mixer. I have an indoor small venue we are doing in a couple weeks. We can almost do it acoustically, but the vocalist and guitar player insist on being heard over my banjo ;-) So I will try to use just one Thump dialed down, with a channel each for guitar, vocal,bass and one channel for the rest of us (mando,fiddle,banjo) to take breaks on. Oh I ended with a preposition... Don't tell Miss Jones.

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