Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

313
Banjo Lovers Online


Gibson Granada On American Pickers?

Want to hide these Google ads? Join the Players Union!

Page: 1  2   Last Page (2) 

Jun 12, 2019 - 7:46:29 AM
948 posts since 6/20/2014

On a recent episode of American Pickers, they were with an 80-something year old guy with diverse collections, including a dozen or more cased instruments.

He had been a professional musician.

They asked him to play something and his son handed him what appeared to be a gold plated Gibson Five String Mastertone flathead.

He didn't have picks handy, so he did a credible, up-tempo clawhammer riff.

They never discussed the banjo on air.

I think they were in central Kentucky.

Anybody else see that?

Charlie Noyes

Edited by - CEParagon124 on 06/12/2019 07:46:58

Jun 12, 2019 - 12:01:49 PM

324 posts since 5/19/2018

I didn’t see it, but after the show they probaly offered him 975.00 for it.

Jun 12, 2019 - 12:45:24 PM

banjonz

New Zealand

10676 posts since 6/29/2003

Don't tell Jim Mills!

Jun 12, 2019 - 1:07:47 PM

Dave Churm

Canada

61 posts since 7/24/2007

probably, in the sign business for 44 yrs, pickers came around offering nothing for the signs. Making out your their best friend, and then you see there profit at the end of the show. Like I don't own a tv and watch the shows. Thrown them off the property many times here. Fair offer of what its worth.

Jun 12, 2019 - 6:26:52 PM

1711 posts since 12/31/2005

I'm looking for it, but found this cool thing. Player banjo starts at :41 LINK

Jun 12, 2019 - 7:46:34 PM

8649 posts since 1/15/2005

I saw it and it sure looked like a gold plated flathead. I think they may have bought one cheap banjo from him for a couple of hundred bucks, but have no idea why they didn't inquire about the Granada.

Jun 12, 2019 - 8:22:31 PM

948 posts since 6/20/2014

The did buy a cheap wall hanger, probably for more than it was worth.

I will check to see if the episode is now available on demand.

Charlie

Jun 14, 2019 - 8:12:31 AM
Players Union Member

heavy5

USA

840 posts since 11/3/2016
Online Now

Could have been an RB 800

Jun 14, 2019 - 8:31:38 AM
likes this

1623 posts since 2/10/2003

quote:
Originally posted by Dave Churm

probably, in the sign business for 44 yrs, pickers came around offering nothing for the signs. Making out your their best friend, and then you see there profit at the end of the show. Like I don't own a tv and watch the shows. Thrown them off the property many times here. Fair offer of what its worth.


If you’re in the sign business then you realize to sustain a business, any business, you need to buy stuff for less then you can sell it for in order to make profit. It wouldn’t be worth any picker’s time (not just the TV show pickers) to buy a sign at market price. From what I have seen on the show, they do offer fair wholesale prices for the items. Sometimes, they will even offer more then the owner asks for because they know what the item will bring in their store or by a buyer they have in their pocket. 

Edited by - 250gibson on 06/14/2019 08:36:31

Jun 14, 2019 - 9:23:41 AM

Dave Churm

Canada

61 posts since 7/24/2007

I must clarify, American pickers did not come here. We have something similiar to Craig,s List here in Canada. When you ask a fair price for something , someone always try to low ball you. I was into antiques, if the seller was asking a fair price, I did not try to go lower. I also collect musical instruments, and my prices are always fair. The pickers i had would show on Sundays 6 am and try to offer you $50 for a Dodge sign. After 45 yrs in business, politely offer or ask if i will accept less. I have been to their store in Nashville and it is definately good stuff.

Jun 22, 2019 - 12:18:10 PM

Cleitus

New Zealand

345 posts since 6/10/2011

This does puzzle me - why sell to the pickers when now on the internet you can check the price/value via ebay, craigslist, online blue book etc put it on ebay/whatever and get say 95% of the value?? You would wonder how many 'hidden surprises' the pickers find later on? Used to have something similar in the UK back in the 60's called 'knockers' who would scope out old folks in homes with antiques and offer them comparatively nothing to the real value of the item. As a result of this nowadays I understand you are legally obliged to disclose the true value of stuff you are buying in the UK and if you don't a Judge can (and has) undo the deal.

Jun 22, 2019 - 3:00:04 PM

1978 posts since 4/29/2012
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by Cleitus

Used to have something similar in the UK back in the 60's called 'knockers' who would scope out old folks in homes with antiques and offer them comparatively nothing to the real value of the item. As a result of this nowadays I understand you are legally obliged to disclose the true value of stuff you are buying in the UK and if you don't a Judge can (and has) undo the deal.


That law's a new one on me.  You got a reference ?  My mother was an antique dealer. When a knocker came to the door with their usual opening line of "I buy old gold and silver" her usual response was "so do I". Got rid of them pretty quickly. She never offered a price if a member of the public came into the shop with something to sell - always insisting they name their own price and had good proof of ownership and then saying "yes" or "no". Whatever the Latin is for the opposite of "caveat emptor" applies.....

Just looked it up - Caveat venditor.

Jun 22, 2019 - 3:04 PM

8649 posts since 1/15/2005

Many people had rather have cash or money on the spot rather than selling on EBay (which isn't free) or on Craig's List and have people they do not know coming to their house. You may be aware that Frank and Mike are not welcome at every place they go. From what I have seen, particularly on objects whose value I am familiar with, their offers are fair. It is expensive to drive a van all over the country so they can't pay retail value for items. ,they don't do anything that anybody else in business does not do.

Jun 22, 2019 - 8:01:27 PM

2463 posts since 2/16/2017

quote:
Originally posted by BanjoLink

Many people had rather have cash or money on the spot rather than selling on EBay (which isn't free) or on Craig's List and have people they do not know coming to their house. You may be aware that Frank and Mike are not welcome at every place they go. From what I have seen, particularly on objects whose value I am familiar with, their offers are fair. It is expensive to drive a van all over the country so they can't pay retail value for items. ,they don't do anything that anybody else in business does not do.


I think you are on point with this post, John, and with your previous post in the thread.  American Pickers is one of the small handful of TV shows I regularly watch.  Compared to you I'm a novice when it comes to antiques, but I am a bit of a collector.  I am always impressed with the fairness of Mike and Frank in their offeres and their negotiating tactics, and always humbled by the depth of their knowledge.  Like you said, they will often offer more than an asking price when the seller doesn't know the value of that they have.  Yes, there are cameras on them, but I really think that they would do the same if the cameras weren't there.  They seem like good people to me.

Jun 22, 2019 - 9:31:57 PM

Cleitus

New Zealand

345 posts since 6/10/2011

quote:
Originally posted by AndrewD
quote:
Originally posted by Cleitus

Used to have something similar in the UK back in the 60's called 'knockers' who would scope out old folks in homes with antiques and offer them comparatively nothing to the real value of the item. As a result of this nowadays I understand you are legally obliged to disclose the true value of stuff you are buying in the UK and if you don't a Judge can (and has) undo the deal.


That law's a new one on me.  You got a reference ? 

Just looked it up - Caveat venditor.


Not off the top of my head as it was so long ago I read about the law change and the court case where an elderly person was diddled by a knocker and the bargain being undone.

However the fair value section of the unfair trading practices or the 'omission of significant information' should apply - see this

https://www.lawdonut.co.uk/business/marketing-and-selling/consumer-protection/unfair-trading-trade-descriptions-and-pricing-faqs

Over here in NZ we had an interesting case where someone tried to acquire a historic photograph of the 1908 all black team for very little money and a Judge cancelled the alleged sale on the basis of value. 

Jun 22, 2019 - 9:38:29 PM

Cleitus

New Zealand

345 posts since 6/10/2011

quote:
Originally posted by BanjoLink

Many people had rather have cash or money on the spot rather than selling on EBay (which isn't free) or on Craig's List and have people they do not know coming to their house. You may be aware that Frank and Mike are not welcome at every place they go. From what I have seen, particularly on objects whose value I am familiar with, their offers are fair. It is expensive to drive a van all over the country so they can't pay retail value for items. ,they don't do anything that anybody else in business does not do.


Not trying to suggest that the pickers are unfair or offering less than a reasonable price - just surprised that in the US (the home of captialism) so many will sell to them so easily without going on line to check the value first, or seeing if they can sell themselves. Unless I'd invited people to buy, I'd be reluctant to let them past the front gate.

Jun 23, 2019 - 12:16:32 AM

1978 posts since 4/29/2012
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by Cleitus
quote:
Originally posted by AndrewD
quote:
Originally posted by Cleitus

Used to have something similar in the UK back in the 60's called 'knockers' who would scope out old folks in homes with antiques and offer them comparatively nothing to the real value of the item. As a result of this nowadays I understand you are legally obliged to disclose the true value of stuff you are buying in the UK and if you don't a Judge can (and has) undo the deal.


That law's a new one on me.  You got a reference ? 

Just looked it up - Caveat venditor.


Not off the top of my head as it was so long ago I read about the law change and the court case where an elderly person was diddled by a knocker and the bargain being undone.

However the fair value section of the unfair trading practices or the 'omission of significant information' should apply - see this

https://www.lawdonut.co.uk/business/marketing-and-selling/consumer-protection/unfair-trading-trade-descriptions-and-pricing-faqs

Over here in NZ we had an interesting case where someone tried to acquire a historic photograph of the 1908 all black team for very little money and a Judge cancelled the alleged sale on the basis of value. 


That link applies to protection of  "consumers", i.e non-business purchasers. Nothing in law to stop you selling anything for as low as you want (with a  a few caveats like unfair competition, which wouldn't apply to a used banjo). There may be other get-outs in standard contract law where the buyer has supplied false information (telling the seller that X is gold-plated not solid gold, is available anywhere for a price lower than its actual worth , is by uncle Fred not Rembrandt). But if you  offer to sell your house to a stranger for a fiver and he says "yes" that's a valid contract unless it can be proved that you are not competent to enter into a contract, which was probably the case with your elderly knocker victim.  AFAIK there is no specific law forbidding you to sell at a ridiculously low price. Another factor to appreciate is what a low price consists of when buying from the public. The difference between insurance value (what you would have to pay if you wanted one tomorrow) and actual value (what you would get if you had to turn it into cash tomorrow)  is often vast. I knew some of those old knockers. Some of them were honest but completely ignorant and bought specifically by weight at a small discount to the scrap price. If your solid silver teapot was auntie's wedding present new in 1953  you got a fair price. If it was made by Paul Revere probably not so much. Anything they didn't sell to the scrap dealers to be melted down was (in London anyway) sold at the Cutler street outdoor market very early on a Sunday morning to dealers further up the food chain. 

Jun 23, 2019 - 1:32:58 AM

Cleitus

New Zealand

345 posts since 6/10/2011

The point is the law WILL apply to buyers who knowingly buy something at a very low price and they know the seller does not know/realise it/thinks they are getting a fair price on the basis of the buyers word. Agree nothing stops you selling for as low as you like if you are aware of the prices BUT if you rely on the buyer and they mislead or deliberately are silent over what they know to be a valuable product then there is legal recourse. it's like a music dealer coming to your door and saying 'oh an old Gibson 1937 mastertone banjo - well banjos don't go for much now so how about $20' - the law now effectively says he knew the value and should have been honest. Of course proving it is a different matter. The knockers you knew differed from mine - 'cunning evil old bastards like Steptoe' is how I'd have described them.

Edited by - Cleitus on 06/23/2019 01:34:49

Jun 23, 2019 - 2:15:47 AM

Cleitus

New Zealand

345 posts since 6/10/2011

As a total sideline NZ used to have a law (now probably long gone) that also prevented ridiculous or excessive charges for goods and services - say you got someone in to cut down a small bush and they then tried to charge you $8000 for doing it - they were restricted to the professional range of charges for goods and services. But as I said I suspect long gone, as some of this behaviour has resurfaced with UK cowboys coming over and trying their luck here with the elderly.

Are all the totters, knockers, tally men, rag and bone etc. all gone now?? Some of the east(?) end 'antique' shops used to use them to get stock I recall. There was an expose done of the whole business in the Sunday Times Colour Mag about 1967 - they even faked two blackamoor statues and embarrassed Sothebys by revealing them after they'd gone up the food chain.

Was the cutler street market one of the London 'market ouvert' - I cannot recall.

Jun 23, 2019 - 5:26:19 AM

8649 posts since 1/15/2005

There is a big difference going to a yard sale or buying an expensive for a low price and going into someone’s home and telling them an item is worth much more than it is worth and offering/paying them practically nothing (Google Russ Pritchard-George Pickett). Quite often American Pickers will tell the seller that something is worth “x” but we can only pay “y”.

Andrew has it completely right. There is also a difference between illegal and unethical.

Jun 23, 2019 - 5:50 AM

8649 posts since 1/15/2005

Several people here have pointed out that Frank and Mike mostly buy for commercial establishments like restaurants (think Cracker Barrel). Other very expensive items probably go to collectors that they know or know who they are. From what I understand practically none of this stuff goes in their shop where they mostly sell t-shirts and souvenir items.

Regarding finding out what something is worth on the internet, it’s not as easy as it sounds. The vast majority of items you see is the “asking” price not what it actually sold for. Also auction item prices do not reflect how much the seller received. I saw last night on “Strange Inheritance” that a rare Texas Map sold at Heritage Auctions for $149,000 and the seller wound up with $98,000. How is that different from a picker offering an individual $98,000 for a $149,000 map?

Jun 23, 2019 - 6:08:02 AM

1978 posts since 4/29/2012
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by Cleitus


Was the cutler street market one of the London 'market ouvert' - I cannot recall.


I doubt it. As far as I remember only the Bermondsey market was covered by the mediaeval "marché ouvert" laws, which it inherited from the old Caledonian Road market which it replaced. Cutler St. was a few trestle tables in a squalid alley behind the Houndsditch Warehouse where on a cold winter Sunday morning you could watch thousands of pounds worth of antique silver and jewellery being bought and sold by dodgy looking characters dressed like tramps but with large wads of notes in their pockets. For those not in the know; marché ouvert was a law which said that you were not breaking the law if you bought something that later turned out to be stolen if the market was deemed to be a "marché ouvert" (open market) and the transaction was done between sunrise and sunset. It was abolished some years ago.

Jun 23, 2019 - 6:18:11 AM

RB3

USA

478 posts since 4/12/2004

I'd be interested in watching the show mentioned in the original post of this thread. Does anyone know the title of the episode?

Jun 23, 2019 - 3:04:30 PM

8649 posts since 1/15/2005

quote:
Originally posted by RB3

I'd be interested in watching the show mentioned in the original post of this thread. Does anyone know the title of the episode?


We know it Wayne ..... but we ain't telling you .... or Sparky!wink

Jun 24, 2019 - 7:59:23 PM

948 posts since 6/20/2014

The banjo was featured in Season 20, Episode 12, “Frank Meet Brank”

It is available free, On Demand, on AT&T U-Verse.

I tried to take some photos off the flat screen TV,but it was difficult and they did not turn out well, due to constant motion.

Charlie Noyes 




 

Edited by - CEParagon124 on 06/24/2019 20:02:03

Jun 24, 2019 - 8:30:11 PM

948 posts since 6/20/2014

The gentleman’s name is Howard. He was eighty-nine years old when the program was recorded. He lives in Central Kentucky.

At one time, he owned The Car Collector’s Hall Of Fame In Nashville.

Page: 1  2   Last Page (2) 

Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.328125