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Apr 24, 2019 - 5:12:24 AM
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574 posts since 8/9/2008

…to remove paint from a door...

Hi all

I know some of you are a lot more practical than me, so I am seeking advice!

I have an old Victorian front door which I want to restore & repaint. It's not in bad nick but would certainly benefit from a new lick of paint. Should I have the door chemically stripped down to the wood and then repainted, or is it enough just to have it sanded down some and then repainted..?

thanks!
marc

Apr 24, 2019 - 5:29:19 AM
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2422 posts since 2/16/2017
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Strippers are nasty, but that door is almost certainly caked in layers of lead paint. Sanding is the absolute worst thing you can do to lead paint.

So you’ll have to pick your poison. Whichever one I chose, I would do it outdoors, not in my shop. I would wear HEPA filtered mask, even outdoors, if was I sanding that old paint.

Stripping should be less labor intensive, but make sure you research proper handling, and consider a respirator for that too. A respirator for chemicals will use a different type of filter than one that is used for particulate, though.

Apr 24, 2019 - 5:29:35 AM
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177 posts since 3/29/2018

If the stripper has the experience, I'd say go for it. Some have quite the work ethic and I'm sure that that would carry over to painting your door. A good painter can strip that door down in no time. Install a pole on the porch so she can reach those high places up in the corners. Also, be sure and get some dollar bills to keep up enthusiasm and reward a job well done...My 2 cents.

Apr 24, 2019 - 5:32:24 AM
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8586 posts since 1/15/2005
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quote:
Originally posted by Astrobanjo

If the stripper has the experience, I'd say go for it. Some have quite the work ethic and I'm sure that that would carry over to painting your door. A good painter can strip that door down in no time. Install a pole on the porch so she can reach those high places up in the corners. Also, be sure and get some dollar bills to keep up enthusiasm and reward a job well done...My 2 cents.


"my 2 cenys"   .... or at least a one-dollar bill, you cheapskate!

Apr 24, 2019 - 6:01:26 AM
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figmo59

USA

28805 posts since 3/5/2008

Do not sand blast...

I perfur a profleshnal stripper...
A few bucks n you'll be satisfied.... :0)

If you want to do it yerself..
Try Zip Strip...
A kinda ..teedyous job tho...
Rubber gloves n a putty knife..lots 'ah rags...
I would sujest glasses too..
Work smock...or a ..full body..Condom... 0)

Edited by - figmo59 on 04/24/2019 06:02:09

Apr 24, 2019 - 6:10:01 AM

chuckv97

Canada

40080 posts since 10/5/2013

Did somebody say full body condom....?

Edited by - chuckv97 on 04/24/2019 06:10:24

Apr 24, 2019 - 6:43:44 AM

277 posts since 8/14/2018
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Some years ago I lived in an 18th-century house and decided to remove the paint from some of the woodwork. Many layers of paint had been used over the years, and you could hardly see the shape of wood under it any more. Obviously, much of it was lead. I used Peel-Away. It was very laborious. It is lye, so you have to handle it carefully. And when you are done, the sheets are covered in lye and lead paint, so they have to be disposed of as hazardous waste. But this is one of the less-damaging ways to do it. As others have said, under no circumstances use a sander on lead paint.

Apr 24, 2019 - 8:12:20 AM
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Owen

Canada

3418 posts since 6/5/2011
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No help with your question, but if you're removing stuff down to the bare wood, IMO, if at all possible, it would be nice to keep the wood's inherent beauty on display, instead of hidden under paint.   But before going too far, maybe the stripper has some worthwhile advice.

Edited by - Owen on 04/24/2019 08:14:38

Apr 24, 2019 - 8:59:49 AM

mander

USA

3240 posts since 10/7/2007

What about scrapping it first?

Or... we have companies here that do professional stripping. Haven't used one in a few decades, but I was amazed at how cheap it was then. Well worth the price.

Apr 24, 2019 - 9:33:26 AM
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146 posts since 9/21/2018

I've always liked CitruStrip. Not quite as terrible on older things. I've done few older gun stocks with it. Readily available too.

Apr 24, 2019 - 6:17:19 PM

bubbalouie

Canada

12272 posts since 9/27/2007

There used to be places called Dip & Strip. They dunked the whole thing in the stripper juice.

It removes ALL the paint but the glue too. When they dipped furniture you had to put most of it back together.

If you try to do it yourself you probably won't be happy with the results & the work involved.

Your door is probably pinned or tacked together so it should work out.

Sanding would work if there isn't too much detail.

Helping an ex girlfriend strip an antique rocking chair almost ended it then. All those nooks & crannies & that toxic cleaner was no fun. 

Apr 26, 2019 - 6:57:39 AM

566 posts since 4/22/2018

Marc, if it’s in situ as your front door then I’d suggest good old nitromors - it’s pretty effective, it requires a bit of elbow grease and a few shapes of scraper depending on the panel detail. If it’s not in situ so you can manage without it for a few days I’d google door dipping near your address- it’s surprisingly cheap and absolutely no effort. I do a fair bit of DIY and am not lazy but would always opt for the dipping over stripping it myself both on lack of effort and quality of finish

Apr 26, 2019 - 8:56:30 PM

Paul R

Canada

11202 posts since 1/28/2010

We used a heat gun stripper on a door in our Toronto house. It worked quite well and fast, and the only "chemical" was the soft paint that came off. You should be careful to not remain too long over one spot, but we had no burn marks that I can recall.

Apr 27, 2019 - 2:07:59 AM
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574 posts since 8/9/2008

Thanks all. I'll likely get it professionally stripped as there's a local company. I like the idea of keeping the wood rather than painting, but it's an old Victorian and this wouldn't be in keeping with the aesthetic of the place.

I'm guessing dunking the door in a chemical bath doesn't damage the wood?

Apr 27, 2019 - 5:44:56 AM

391 posts since 12/30/2012

I have recently had several doors stripped for a customer. one was an exterior door. the stripped doors only needed a light sanding before finishing. we used tung oil on the exterior door,when they saw how good they looked, they did not want to paint them. the inside doors where also left unpainted. the cost was 150.00 per door, plus a small percentage to get rid of the lead. well worth it if you have ever tried doing it yourself. that peel away product works real well, just do not get any on your skin. I used the same idea with regular paint stripper then used plastic wrap over the top. the idea is that as long as it stays wet, it works. so you can leave it overnight.still a big mess, with all the chemicals, and lead waste. anything i have ever had stripped came out just great with no damage. the only time damage would occur is when the item is held together by the paint, as in the case of an old wooden shutters that fall apart. good luck, good project. there is satisfaction in the results, even if you do not do it yourself.

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