Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

383
Banjo Lovers Online


Want to hide these Google ads? Join the Players Union!
Apr 18, 2019 - 1:45:55 PM
829 posts since 4/13/2017

I have a piece of black cherry that is 36" long, 7.875" wide, and 1.5" thick. I want to make a block pot with integrated tone ring from this, and the pot needs to be 2.75" tall.

Is it required for a block pot to have 3 layers for stability? If at all possible, I'd like to try to get two pots out of that cherry board, and I believe if I only make my pots with two layers, it can be done.

So if I have two layers each 1.5" tall, making a 3" tall pot, then taking off a quarter inch to make it 2.75" tall pot, would it be stable enough?

The reason for wanting to make two pots is so I can try making both a flathead woodie and an archtop woodie and compare the sounds using a similar setup.

Apr 18, 2019 - 2:51:41 PM

2529 posts since 2/18/2009

Two layers will not be ideal in my opinion. I use three or four and add a rim cap to the bottom to further strengthen the joints. My first few rims only had one layer, and they were prone to shock failure from being dropped even pretty gently. A good 3 or 4 layer rim is very shock resistant, I have had a few rims or rim blanks fall off a bench or shelf onto a concrete floor from 3-4 feet up or more, and they had no joint failure, just a little flat spot where they hit.
Zach

Apr 18, 2019 - 3:06:25 PM

829 posts since 4/13/2017

What about using a stave construction? With the grain running vertically? Would that be stronger?

Apr 18, 2019 - 3:15:54 PM
Players Union Member

Helix1

USA

95 posts since 4/17/2019

The trouble with two tier brick rims is that there are holes for the neck studs right where the seam is. Stelling used to do two tiers,now they do three. Delaminations are more likely.

Stave is a good type of rim, are you talking a 3-tier? or a one tier. Shorter pieces are stronger.

Aside: a wooden flange is possible where the pieces are too short to flex, very trick for the middle tier. Radial grain.

Apr 18, 2019 - 7:24:22 PM

411 posts since 4/13/2011

If you want to identical rims, use the cherry to make 4 layers ( 2 each rim) of .75 thick block layers and then add another .75 layer of harder tone ring wood.

Apr 18, 2019 - 7:46:31 PM

829 posts since 4/13/2017

quote:
Originally posted by Stephen45710

If you want to identical rims, use the cherry to make 4 layers ( 2 each rim) of .75 thick block layers and then add another .75 layer of harder tone ring wood.


That's the thing...I don't have anything harder. I have enough maple for like, 3/4 of a layer. That's all.

Apr 19, 2019 - 7:13:11 AM

ackeim

USA

176 posts since 8/22/2005

I also have found 4 layers to be better than 2 or 3. The decorative cap at the bottom also makes things stronger. You don't want someone pulling the blocks apart when they over tighten the hooks and leave the banjo in the car on a warm day. I really think you should add a fourth layer of contrasting wood to stretch your cherry for both builds. Don't have anything harder? Go grab something. Two banjos from that board are better than one.
Aaron

Apr 19, 2019 - 7:35:04 AM

829 posts since 4/13/2017

I re-measured the piece of maple I have, and it is just enough for one layer, so I could have a 3 layer pot, and I know where I could pick up another piece of maple similarly sized as this one to make another tone ring layer on the second pot. Here's a 3d model of cherry pots with maple tone rings. You can see which is flathead and which is archtop.


Apr 19, 2019 - 8:57:20 AM
Players Union Member

Helix1

USA

95 posts since 4/17/2019

Those look nice. Archtop woodies work
I would steer you next toward the knock note. Go to Home Depot and look at some lumber
Go to Goodwill or Salvation Army and find a piece of hardwood and cut it up

Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.171875