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Flooding in Fond Du Lac, Wisconsin

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Mar 14, 2019 - 8:11:30 PM
50801 posts since 12/14/2005

Wisconsin had a lot of snow, and now, several days of warm weather.
Hundreds of people evacuated, and major streets impassible.

Hope you folks are safe wherever you are.

Mar 14, 2019 - 8:39:28 PM

Mooooo

USA

6208 posts since 8/20/2016

Stay dry Mike

Mar 14, 2019 - 11:02:30 PM
Players Union Member

Brian T

Canada

15115 posts since 6/5/2008

In 1975 when my house was built, the lot was "crowned" about 18" above the local neighborhood. Every spring, I have waterfront property for a while.

The prediction here is that we will see as high as +60F in the shade in a week.
3 months snow and not a day of melting is ready to go.
Blub, blub, blub.

Mar 15, 2019 - 5:35:40 AM
Players Union Member

wizofos

USA

4919 posts since 8/19/2012

Just 55 miles north of FDL and flooding all over. Green Bay is has 2 rivers, the Fox and the East River, the East River is flooding and only one bridge open over it. The Little Wolf River a mile from our house is flooding but up river from us.
Green Bay and Fond du lac schools are closed as well as other activities in the area due to flooded roads, buses can't get through.
Boats evacuating people in Green Bay.
Our home is 50 feet above the river so not too concerned about it, don't even have a sump pump. I may be re-grading my yard to help snow melt run off faster next year.

Mar 15, 2019 - 9:30:36 AM
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mander

USA

2933 posts since 10/7/2007

We had that in Portland about twenty years back. My weather chasing sister-in-law drove around all over trying to watch the flood up close and got stuck and needed rescuing. She stopped chasing storms shortly there after.

Our house is 500 feet above sea level. I stay where it is safe.

Hope all goes well for you!

Mar 15, 2019 - 9:33:29 AM
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mander

USA

2933 posts since 10/7/2007

quote:
Originally posted by wizofos

Just 55 miles north of FDL and flooding all over. Green Bay is has 2 rivers, the Fox and the East River, the East River is flooding and only one bridge open over it. The Little Wolf River a mile from our house is flooding but up river from us.
Green Bay and Fond du lac schools are closed as well as other activities in the area due to flooded roads, buses can't get through.
Boats evacuating people in Green Bay.
Our home is 50 feet above the river so not too concerned about it, don't even have a sump pump. I may be re-grading my yard to help snow melt run off faster next year.


I don't know the area, by I'd still be concerned over fifty feet. I was in a tiny village in Fiji when there were flooding. The river rose 50 feet in less than 24 hours. Thankfully, the village was 50 feet and one inch.

Mar 15, 2019 - 1:28:49 PM
Players Union Member

wizofos

USA

4919 posts since 8/19/2012

quote:
Originally posted by mander
quote:
Originally posted by wizofos

Just 55 miles north of FDL and flooding all over. Green Bay is has 2 rivers, the Fox and the East River, the East River is flooding and only one bridge open over it. The Little Wolf River a mile from our house is flooding but up river from us.
Green Bay and Fond du lac schools are closed as well as other activities in the area due to flooded roads, buses can't get through.
Boats evacuating people in Green Bay.
Our home is 50 feet above the river so not too concerned about it, don't even have a sump pump. I may be re-grading my yard to help snow melt run off faster next year.


I don't know the area, by I'd still be concerned over fifty feet. I was in a tiny village in Fiji when there were flooding. The river rose 50 feet in less than 24 hours. Thankfully, the village was 50 feet and one inch.


@mander Green Bay is 591 feet above seat level which is about the same as Lake Michigan.  The river nearest my home  is 771 feet above sea level and my home is 790 feet above sea level.   If the river gets up to my home most of eastern Wisconsin will be under water and there will be a lot of problems.   We will be on an island since we are near the top of a ridge that divides the Lake Michigan drainage and the Wisconsin River Drainage.

Mar 15, 2019 - 2:09:38 PM
Players Union Member

Brian T

Canada

15115 posts since 6/5/2008

I'll guess that you all are downstream from me. All your sewage treatment ponds will be overflowing. We have a gigantic zero discharge system.
We won't see the BIG MELT until June, as usual.

Mar 15, 2019 - 2:46:51 PM

Owen

Canada

3145 posts since 6/5/2011

quote:
Originally posted by wizofos

  I may be re-grading my yard to help snow melt run off faster next year.


Does a faster run-off add to floods or the possibility of flooding?    

Edited by - Owen on 03/15/2019 14:48:11

Mar 15, 2019 - 3:06:48 PM
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Players Union Member

wizofos

USA

4919 posts since 8/19/2012

quote:
Originally posted by Owen
quote:
Originally posted by wizofos

  I may be re-grading my yard to help snow melt run off faster next year.


Does a faster run-off add to floods or the possibility of flooding?    


Actually my yard runs off down a hill through some woods  into a spring fed kettle pond. During the spring it  gets up to almost 2  acres in size and in summer about 50' in diameter. Less in a really dry year.  It has no outlet only drains into the ground or evaporation.   If it gets high enough like this year it might join with a second kettle pond about 100 yards away and make one big puddle.  As the water goes down  we get 2 ponds again.

Mar 16, 2019 - 3:03:25 PM

mander

USA

2933 posts since 10/7/2007

quote:
Originally posted by wizofos
quote:
Originally posted by Owen
quote:
Originally posted by wizofos

  I may be re-grading my yard to help snow melt run off faster next year.


Does a faster run-off add to floods or the possibility of flooding?    


Actually my yard runs off down a hill through some woods  into a spring fed kettle pond. During the spring it  gets up to almost 2  acres in size and in summer about 50' in diameter. Less in a really dry year.  It has no outlet only drains into the ground or evaporation.   If it gets high enough like this year it might join with a second kettle pond about 100 yards away and make one big puddle.  As the water goes down  we get 2 ponds again.


When we first moved to the "new" place, 80 years of lawn had compacted the soil into concert and water would run off in sheets. It was horrendous. Long short, 8 years of hard labor later, the soil has been opened up, and the water actually goes into the soil instead of across it, and I'm no longer terrified that the second coming is upon us just because it's raining. 

Yes, a faster run off leads to greater flooding.

I've heard of kettle bogs, but not kettle ponds, so I looked it up. Sounds like someplace I'd love to live, though I imagine one would have to learn to pay attention where one steps.

Mar 16, 2019 - 4:59:32 PM
Players Union Member

wizofos

USA

4919 posts since 8/19/2012

mander
'I've heard of kettle bogs, but not kettle ponds, so I looked it up. Sounds like someplace I'd love to live, though I imagine one would have to learn to pay attention where one steps.'

Kettle lakes turn into Kettle ponds that turn into Kettle bogs, that eventually turn into good grazing land as they fill in with rotten vegetation.

You have to pay attention to where you step but you wear knee high rubber muck boots (Wellingtons for those on the other side of the pond) for more than cleaning out a dairy barn.

Mar 16, 2019 - 11:50:45 PM

50801 posts since 12/14/2005

A lot of the Fond Du Lac flooding was due to ice breaking up, floating, and making a dam where it was stuck under a bridge.
Power shovels dug most of it out, and some melted.
Still, more water around than most folks NEED right now.
Where I live, no major problems.

Mar 17, 2019 - 1:49:53 AM

64 posts since 3/25/2016

@ mander:

As with nearly everything geologic, SCALE is critical. Kettle ponds and kettle lakes represent the rough original volumes of stranded glacial ice blocks, now melted, with that now absent ice leaving depressions commonly incorporated into the disrupted soil and rock "bulldozed" by the glacier. There exists, therefore, a great range in size of such depressions. Time passes, climate changes (Hey, wait!! It's happened before?!?), the ice melts, and there's your depression ready to be filled by later some season's run-off. Just as with lakes and ponds, those depressions become filled with vegetation and soil debris, eventually becoming fertile pocket meadows, which then undergo an analogous evolution from grass to bushes to trees to dark pine forest. Chain of Lakes, Minnesota (and Wisconsin, and Illinois, and so on) represent a series of such kettles related to a receding glacier.

Mar 17, 2019 - 7:33:39 AM
Players Union Member

wizofos

USA

4919 posts since 8/19/2012

banjo5280
Thanks Clay for the description, I could not have done better and I have lived in this area most of my life. I mentioned that our kettle pond was normally less than 50' in diameter in the summer but there are many larger kettle lakes. Below is an extract about Lake Geneva in the southern part of the state.

'Geneva Lake is a body of freshwater in Walworth County in southeastern Wisconsin.[1] On its shores are the city of Lake Geneva, and the villages of Fontana-on-Geneva-Lake, and Williams Bay.

The lake covers an area of approximately 5,401 acres (8.439 sq mi; 21.86 km2),[1] has a maximum length of 7.5 miles (12.1 km),[1] mean depth of 61 feet (19 m)[1] and a maximum depth of 135 feet (41 m).[1] Geologists believe that it is a filled-in kettle formed from a receding glacier. '

Mar 17, 2019 - 12:36:39 PM

64 posts since 3/25/2016

wizofos
Thanks for the appreciation--apparently all those years in graduate school (and 40-plus years as a professional geologist) paid off! I played banjo at the McMurdo Station Officer's Club several nights a week during my first professional geology jig, helping to drill the first bedrock holes in the Antarctic continent.

Mar 19, 2019 - 4:06:21 PM

Owen

Canada

3145 posts since 6/5/2011

Here's part of Manitoba's effort [I don't know if they're used in other places, or if there's empirical data on their effectiveness.]  

https://www.cbc.ca/player/play/1455976515601

Mar 19, 2019 - 6:15:53 PM
Players Union Member

wizofos

USA

4919 posts since 8/19/2012

quote:
Originally posted by Owen

Here's part of Manitoba's effort [I don't know if they're used in other places, or if there's empirical data on their effectiveness.]  

https://www.cbc.ca/player/play/1455976515601


@owen   Not sure if these would help much, maybe make the problem worse.  The flooding was caused because chunks of ice jammed up against the bridges.  These rivers are normally less than 50 feet wide.   With spring run off the water behind an ice jam can rise several feet in a few minutes.

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