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Feb 11, 2019 - 12:33:53 PM
50479 posts since 12/14/2005
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Mine went dead.

AAA guy showed up, clipped on his tester gadget, told me it was shot, offered to sell me the one he had brought with.

I declined the offer, he jump-started my car, and I went home.

Bought a battery the next morning.

Took the old one inside the house, popped the caps, discovered the fluid was low in the cells.

Topped them off, hooked up the charger.

Next day, tok my little battery-tester bulb, checked the cells.

Four showed full charge, two showed 75% good.

So, is the battery worth keeping?

Edited by - Texasbanjo on 02/12/2019 04:43:47

Feb 11, 2019 - 12:47:03 PM

Blackjaxe47

Canada

1384 posts since 6/20/2014

Not really Mike, once those cells go dead the battery is only working around 65 to 70% and you will find it loses power very quickly and will need to be recharged AGAIN.
However if you want to experiment and this is something I would only do outside. Hook-up the charger and take the caps off, make a small tent from a vinyl tarp and hang some of your nickel plated banjo parts from wire over the battery. While it is charging it will give off sulfuric acid fumes which will relic the nickel finish. Those fumes are dangerous so never do this in any enclosed area and for sure not your house.

Feb 11, 2019 - 1:18:12 PM

Brian T

Canada

14905 posts since 6/5/2008
Online Now

It's one thing to charge up OK, it's quite another to hold that charge for use for any length of time.
The low 75% cells are starting to act as an impediment, an insulator, to electricity free-flow.
For the sake of peace of mind and reliability, I'd replace it.

Feb 11, 2019 - 1:24 PM

68063 posts since 5/9/2007

Those that showed full charge are the same age as the bad ones.
Chuck it.

Feb 11, 2019 - 1:30:13 PM

186 posts since 5/19/2018

To keep with this “new” Green Movement and to save the world, you should recycle it. That way you ensure the existence of future generations.

As a battery for your vehicle, it is worthless.

Feb 11, 2019 - 1:35:42 PM

2396 posts since 12/4/2009

Hello,

The old Core is worth at least $15-20.

Feb 11, 2019 - 1:41:12 PM

68063 posts since 5/9/2007

Wal-Mart pays $10 for old batteries when purchasing a new one.

Edited by - steve davis on 02/11/2019 13:42:12

Feb 11, 2019 - 1:46:09 PM
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Players Union Member

rudy

USA

13472 posts since 3/27/2004

Wisconsin?  If you got 4 winters out of it then it's time to change, regardless of what a battery tester, soothsayer, or Quegi board might tell you.

You most definitely don't want to experience what a internally shorted cell will provide you!

Feb 11, 2019 - 1:48:05 PM

Brian T

Canada

14905 posts since 6/5/2008
Online Now

The "Greenies" can't cope. All hat and no cattle.
Recycling batteries only works if you have buyers for the parts.
The battery recycle business away south of me buys batteries from Manitoba to California.
Trainloads of them.
They smash 5,000 lead-acid batteries 24/7.
They sell the sulfuric acid, they smash, wash and remelt the plastic and sell all of it.
The lead is washed, smashed and sold. Purity is expensive to do.

Feb 11, 2019 - 1:48:47 PM
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68063 posts since 5/9/2007

I keep a spare on maintenance charge here in the house.

Feb 11, 2019 - 1:56:36 PM

610 posts since 9/29/2009

Some people rejuvenate them with baking soda.. Go to the google..It is worth a try

Edited by - Billybiltbanjo on 02/11/2019 13:58:59

Feb 11, 2019 - 2:03:55 PM

615 posts since 9/13/2018
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by steve davis

Wal-Mart pays $10 for old batteries when purchasing a new one.


That’s called core replacement. I can’t think of 1 place that dosnt pay for the old one

bruce

Feb 11, 2019 - 2:45:58 PM
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243 posts since 3/12/2014

My dad had cars that, well, sort of ran. As a teenager, I had one he paid $15.00 for that lasted 2 weeks. Cheaper than a taxi.

Anyway, the car battery... a couple a times a week we had to check the oil, radiator fluid, transmission fluid and the battery water level. The batteries seemed to last longer than the cars did.

Needless to say, I was sure delighted with my first new car. :-)

...Deb

Feb 11, 2019 - 2:51:27 PM
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bubbalouie

Canada

11860 posts since 9/27/2007

Always wear eye protection when you're messing with batteries !

They can blow up. If they have any leaks or cracks they can blow up real good if you make a spark when you connect to the terminals.

For the price of a new battery you get that peace of mind.

Feb 11, 2019 - 3:11:45 PM
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50479 posts since 12/14/2005
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quote:
Originally posted by Billybiltbanjo

Some people rejuvenate them with baking soda.. Go to the google..It is worth a try


I may have narrowly squeaked by in Chemistry class, but I am not ignorant of the effect of baking soda contacting ANY acid, be it  acetic (vinegar) or battery.

 

-----------------------

Anyway, I can get the core charge back from the place where I bought the new one.

Just wondered if the old one might still be of SOME use.

------------------------

Thanks for all the comments, everyone.

Feb 11, 2019 - 3:14:15 PM

Brian T

Canada

14905 posts since 6/5/2008
Online Now

If you look closely, I believe you will find that you paid a return deposit on the new battery,
just like pop bottles and beer cans.

Batteries function on the purity of the ingredients. Some physics thing.
Dirty metals make poor batteries. So, there's big cost in purification
and the entire industry is smart enough to know to pay for and hang onto that.

Feb 11, 2019 - 4:05:55 PM

610 posts since 9/29/2009

Mike Gregory.. I did not in any way mean that you were ignorant of the fact.. Your Chemistry class likely exceeded my grade 3, page 2 Canadian edjumacation but I have actually experimented with baking soda in a couple of weak batteries.. It cleaned the corrosion from the plates and did allow them to take a charge after adding more acid. Safety was not a concern in the 60's and I can't remember what kind of acid it was.

Feb 11, 2019 - 4:07:32 PM

Bill H

USA

1168 posts since 11/7/2010

Recycle? Electric banjo?

Feb 11, 2019 - 4:27:35 PM

bubbalouie

Canada

11860 posts since 9/27/2007

I had a '69 Parisienne that was killing batteries so I went to this local battery guy that sold them out of his garage.

He had planks on the concrete floor & had them lined up with batteries on charge.

We went out back & a bunch had blown up & took out a bunch of other ones.

There was acid & shrapnel eveywhere! 

Feb 11, 2019 - 4:30:17 PM

68063 posts since 5/9/2007

Hydrochloric acid.Adding new can give the battery a bit more life.Not much,though.

Feb 11, 2019 - 4:48:42 PM

615 posts since 9/13/2018
Online Now

You should only add distilled water to a battery. And that’s only if it’s lost all it’s water by tipping over. Adding any acid changes the sulfuric content .

Bruce

Feb 11, 2019 - 4:51:32 PM

50479 posts since 12/14/2005
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What I added was melted snow.
That's pretty close to distilled water.
Anyway, I'm unsubscribing from the topic, and taking the old battery in for the core charge refund.

Feb 11, 2019 - 4:55:54 PM

Brian T

Canada

14905 posts since 6/5/2008
Online Now

Lead-acid batteries use sulfuric acid as the electrolyte.
If they out-gas and there's a spark, you get to see and feel a hydrogen explosion
with a big spray of sulfuric acid as a garnish.

The deep-cycle storage batteries in my solar power system are sealed,
don't know what the acid part might be.
They last a long time and are designed to be drained to 11VDC and pumped up.
2 x 6VDC gives more storage but they're $250.00 each.

Feb 11, 2019 - 5:08:56 PM

13886 posts since 12/2/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Brian T

Purity is expensive to do.


Boy, ain’t that the truth. Any further exposition on that point would violate the religion and politics rule.

Feb 11, 2019 - 5:12:23 PM

1695 posts since 2/7/2008

quote:
Originally posted by Billybiltbanjo

Some people rejuvenate them with baking soda.. Go to the google..It is worth a try


Adding baking soda to battery is not a good idea. Ask me how I know. 

Feb 12, 2019 - 3:32:57 AM
Players Union Member

Helix

USA

11764 posts since 8/30/2006
Online Now

Super shuttle here in Phoenix uses a dry cell 12j volt battery for theirs vans, you can guess why.

Baking soda is for indigestion.

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