Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

398
Banjo Lovers Online


[FF] First Nations Fry Bread

Want to hide these Google ads? Join the Players Union!

Page: 1  2   Last Page (2) 

Jan 12, 2019 - 2:33:29 PM
likes this
Players Union Member

Brian T

Canada

15115 posts since 6/5/2008

I got this from a Cree elder last spring. It's the real deal.
Many stories about the oils/fats and/or mixes to get the taste right.

>I use 1/2 Crisco and 1/2 Mazola corn oil. Maybe 1C total in a fry pan.
> I like raisins in mine, maybe a little brown sugar and cinnamon on top.

4C all porpoise flour
1 tbsp baking powder ( Magic Brand here.)
1 tsp salt
2 tbsp powdered milk
1.5C warm water
some extra flour
= = = =
> stir it up and knead to a soft dough
> rest the dough for 15 minutes
> heat the oil to maybe 375F
> flatten 2" balls and fry to brown-ish both sides.

Jan 12, 2019 - 2:52:24 PM

chuckv97

Canada

38635 posts since 10/5/2013

I’ve had bannock , but not pemmican. Sounds like yours is delicious, Brian.

Jan 12, 2019 - 3:05:04 PM
likes this
Players Union Member

Brian T

Canada

15115 posts since 6/5/2008

It's camp food. Too much fuss for trail food. Bannock on a stick is best.

I've made real pemmican = dried and smoked bison meat and rendered bison backstrap fat.
I can buy all that in 5 minutes in this district.
There is no fruit in it like even dried berries. The fruit sugar makes it go moldy.
I learned from Assiniboine elders in the SE corner of Saskatchewan.
Make burgoo with root vegetables and be really gosh-dang starving hungry.

I got some bison for a Christmas present from the rancher guy.
I have eaten 6 or 7 of his bison over the years.
Bison fajita and bison taco are real treat foods.

Jan 12, 2019 - 3:08:25 PM

Mooooo

USA

6210 posts since 8/20/2016

I am really happy that there is no yeast in there. I am going to make this recipe as is, then, next time, I think something savory might be nice. Maybe some garlic and some herbs, we'll see what they have fresh at the store, or dry rosemary is always good.

how flat do you make them, or how round? My guess is 1/4 inch or so...

Thanks Brian...I can't wait to make this.

Jan 12, 2019 - 3:11:53 PM
likes this

1105 posts since 7/14/2004

Ran across this article with a recipe and some history of Alaskan fry bread. Seems it was introduced to North American natives by early white settlers.  

http://www.newsminer.com/features/sundays/community_features/the-cultural-impact-of-frybread-on-alaska/article_bfcfeffa-298b-11e8-ba47-bf125585f3d9.html

Jan 12, 2019 - 3:17:44 PM

bubbalouie

Canada

12035 posts since 9/27/2007

Our Natives got that idea from the Scottish.

http://www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Bannock_(food)

Jan 12, 2019 - 3:39:29 PM

picker5

Canada

114 posts since 9/4/2011

Regardless of the recipe, flatten the dough and then poke a hole in the centre, and open it up to say an inch or so. Sort of like a bagel. It really helps to get the centre cooked through, without overdoing the outside.

Jan 12, 2019 - 3:46:09 PM
like this
Players Union Member

Brian T

Canada

15115 posts since 6/5/2008

No such things as bannock or fry bread until somebody showed up with flour and baking powder.
I'll guess that had to be somewhere in the late 1600's.

In the Klondike gold rush, real sourdough breads and sugar cookies were common.
Newcomers are Chechako until you have spent a winter up there, then you are a "sourdough."
Like Neptune's ceremony to change you from a pollywog to a shellback (1968) when you sail by ship across the equator for the first time.

1/4" thickness is good. The size of your hand. If I had to add herbs/spices, I'd use Italian Mixed Herbs.
Somehow, I can't imagine herbs in fry bread. I always think in the direction of sweet.
Local Dene' woman sells frybreads at the summer market off her trade blanket. Sweet.
She must add extra sugar to the dough but I've never asked her.

Fry bread isn't bannock, which gets baked. Thick roti/chepati, almost like a Naan but fried.
I guess since they get fried, they don't puff up like a baked pita.

Jan 12, 2019 - 7:06:53 PM
likes this

pickin_fool

Canada

2415 posts since 6/30/2017

i've used bacon fat for extra flavor

Jan 13, 2019 - 6:44:10 AM

rinemb

USA

10967 posts since 5/24/2005

I have been wanting to do fry bread, but never got around to it. I will save this recipe for the near future. thx, Brad

Jan 13, 2019 - 6:46:26 AM

rinemb

USA

10967 posts since 5/24/2005

quote:
Originally posted by pickin_fool

i've used bacon fat for extra flavor


I like that.

Jan 13, 2019 - 6:46:56 AM

rinemb

USA

10967 posts since 5/24/2005

So, what do you eat with fry bread? Brad

Jan 13, 2019 - 7:53:31 AM

124 posts since 9/26/2018

quote:
Originally posted by Brian T

No such things as bannock or fry bread until somebody showed up with flour and baking powder.
I'll guess that had to be somewhere in the late 1600's.

In the Klondike gold rush, real sourdough breads and sugar cookies were common.
Newcomers are Chechako until you have spent a winter up there, then you are a "sourdough."
Like Neptune's ceremony to change you from a pollywog to a shellback (1968) when you sail by ship across the equator for the first time.

1/4" thickness is good. The size of your hand. If I had to add herbs/spices, I'd use Italian Mixed Herbs.
Somehow, I can't imagine herbs in fry bread. I always think in the direction of sweet.
Local Dene' woman sells frybreads at the summer market off her trade blanket. Sweet.
She must add extra sugar to the dough but I've never asked her.

Fry bread isn't bannock, which gets baked. Thick roti/chepati, almost like a Naan but fried.
I guess since they get fried, they don't puff up like a baked pita.


Native cultures have used corn flour for thousands of years. Corn is a Native contribution to the world’s culinary traditions. Secondly, wheat has also been an ancient food in African and Asian cultures for thousands of years, so I highly doubt Natives only began using it thanks to the Scots. 

Jan 13, 2019 - 9:49:40 AM
likes this
Players Union Member

Brian T

Canada

15115 posts since 6/5/2008

First Nations did not bring wheat with them across Beringia after 12,000 years there.
Wheat and wheat flour is a deliberate import from Europe.
Must have been introduced with the fur-trading giants = Northwest Company and the Hudson's Bay Company, late 1600's to begin with. Many of the important employees were from Scotland.
Sort of a bass-ackward and ignorant way to describe key historical events.

Wheat cultivation and bread baking is approx 13,000 years old at its Afghani origins.
Subsequent genetic refinements in Canada have produced the best wheats (and flours)
that the world has ever seen.

Parallel would be the American maize/corn genetics contributions made by Orville Redenbacher & family.
Maize is native to the Americas. Lost in prehistory, likely a chance cross pollination in Teosinte.

The 5 basic types cultivated in pre-Columbian times were flint, flour, dent, sweet & popcorn.
In Birdwoman's Garden, she recounts some 6 or 7 different corns that she grew.
Well aware of hybridization, as well. Not all corns grow everywhere.
Soils and moisture levels dictate that.

Corn does not have any similar gluten protein to make fry bread.
I've done it. In fact, corn starch hydrates so poorly that it is the foundation, as corn flour,
of most crispy deep-fry batters for fish, in particular.

Jan 13, 2019 - 9:55:05 AM

pickin_fool

Canada

2415 posts since 6/30/2017

tbh i find fry bread to be pretty boring..first time i tried it i was expecting some sort of bread epiphany..i was like..."thats it?"

Jan 13, 2019 - 10:40:01 AM
likes this

rinemb

USA

10967 posts since 5/24/2005

quote:
Originally posted by pickin_fool

tbh i find fry bread to be pretty boring..first time i tried it i was expecting some sort of bread epiphany..i was like..."thats it?"


Then not enough bacon grease, gravy or jelly, I sume.  It would be easier to fry a piece of sandwich loaf bread, eh.  But no bread, fry the flour.  We fry left over mashed potatoes.  Make a two inch chilled ball, smash it and fry it,. Sometimes I work in an egg first.  Brad

Jan 13, 2019 - 11:26:21 AM
Players Union Member

Brian T

Canada

15115 posts since 6/5/2008

Plain fry bread is plain. Brown sugar, cinnamon, raisins, fine dice apple, lots of things to jack it up.
About as basic a food item as it gets, really. The frying fat(s) has a lot to do with taste as well.
In really bad rainy camp weather, a dose of fry bread will brighten up everybody like bacon does.

Scooped out baked potato guts+ fine dice onion + egg + S&P.
Make cakes and fry. I need Italian Mixed Herbs in mine.

Jan 13, 2019 - 11:45:37 AM
likes this

110 posts since 6/25/2015

Every culture has it's own version of fried dough. Love it all. When I lived in China we used to get youtiao ("Yo-tee-ow") in the mornings. A twisted stick of dough about 12" long deep-fried in peanut oil for about a minute. Great street food, which speaks to the expedient and easy nature of all these fried-dough recipes. Quick and easy, lots of calories in a small and easy to eat package.

Carlos

Jan 13, 2019 - 2:30:45 PM
likes this

Mooooo

USA

6210 posts since 8/20/2016

I just made a half batch of the fry-bread, man, it's tasty. I got 7 pieces about the size of normal size pita bread (6") and already ate two. I took one hot out of the pan, sliced it and shove a slice of swiss cheese in there, let it melt, and wow....tremendous. I substituted 1/4 cup of milk for the milk powder and subtracted 1/3 of the water. It worked perfectly. These are going to be great for sandwiches, tacos, falafel. I am going to try the same with some sourdough starter instead of baking powder just to see what happens. Thanks for the recipe @Brian T.

Jan 13, 2019 - 3:09:56 PM
likes this
Players Union Member

Brian T

Canada

15115 posts since 6/5/2008

Mooooo, you and everybody is welcome. Nice of the Cree elders to share.

If you spent much time in northern Canada, you would never get lost.
All the trails and portages are well marked with a litter of Magic Brand baking powder cans.
They're bright yellow with brown lids. Can't miss 'em. (also a big deal in bannock.)
Good foods to have when you travel by boat.

Jan 14, 2019 - 7:07:15 AM

lazyarcher

Canada

7012 posts since 4/19/2004

Here's more historical takes on the origins..seems it is traced back to the Navajo nation and their internment at Fort Sumner

uproxx.com/life/fry-bread-food-origin/3/

whatscookingamerica.net/Histor...Bread.htm

Jan 14, 2019 - 9:13:10 AM
Players Union Member

Brian T

Canada

15115 posts since 6/5/2008

Somehow, the Navajo experience popularized fry bread moreso that anyone else.
You will find records of a century earlier in the archives of the Hudson's Bay Company.
The Cree recipe that I have is here on record.

Jan 14, 2019 - 11:44:42 AM

382 posts since 4/22/2018

Thanks for posting this Brian- I’m definitely going to have a go at this- in the brew shed as my wife frowns on me deep frying things !!

Jan 14, 2019 - 11:57:26 AM
Players Union Member

Brian T

Canada

15115 posts since 6/5/2008

Maybe 2cm/ 1" hot oil is plenty. Not a deep fryer for battered fish!!
My fry pot is 10" tall = keeps a lot of the oil spatter from jumping out.
Cool on a cake rack over newspaper.

Jan 14, 2019 - 12:28:02 PM
likes this

Mooooo

USA

6210 posts since 8/20/2016

I froze what I didn't eat yesterday and I am now enjoying one that I stuck in the toaster oven for a few minutes with a bit of powdered sugar on top. Nice, warm and delicious. Tastes as good as fresh made.

Jan 14, 2019 - 6:39:28 PM
likes this
Players Union Member

Brian T

Canada

15115 posts since 6/5/2008

OK, Mooooo. I have decided what I want in trade for the Cree Frybread.

I need an upgrade for my bannock.
I want a recipe that I can do in a pan and on a stick.
Can we launch a new thread and recruit recipes?

I've encountered people who have no sense of food security and how poorly their island countries address the issue. British Columbia is only a province in Canada. We can swallow up all of Japan, all of New Zealand and all of the United Kingdom with land to spare. I'll guess that our food window is almost 3 or 4 weeks wide. I'll wager that the UK is 2-3 days.

Page: 1  2   Last Page (2) 

Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.484375