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Jan 11, 2019 - 9:50:38 PM

Mooooo

USA

5445 posts since 8/20/2016

How can a group of cops hold a guy down while another cop uses his taser on the guy without shocking the rest of the cops holding him? I have seen this in a lot of shows. Do people buy this? Maybe electricity works differently on TV or maybe I am crazy.

Jan 11, 2019 - 11:12:55 PM
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172 posts since 4/22/2018

My brother in law is a cop and I was talking to him about tasers last year. The danger zone is the part of the body between the two barbs as the electricity is flowing between them (path of least resistance and all that). If you touch there, you could get zapped but the rest of the body is fine. When he did his training a few of them got tased and they were held up by colleagues to stop them breaking teeth etc when falling over.

Edited by - Wet Spaniel on 01/11/2019 23:13:45

Jan 11, 2019 - 11:36:51 PM

Mooooo

USA

5445 posts since 8/20/2016

That is amazing...assuming your brother-in-law is not a TV cop, but a real one. I never thought of that. Pretty ingenious invention. Thanks for the explanation, but I don't appreciate too much you calling me crazy.

Edited by - Mooooo on 01/11/2019 23:42:30

Jan 12, 2019 - 2:59:33 AM
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172 posts since 4/22/2018

Mad as a hatter !!!

He's a real cop. They also use them like a cattle prod rather than just firing it at a person, so if someone is fighting/struggling they can be zapped without harming the cops they are wrestling with.

When he told me it got me to thinking is it really necessary to stand clear when shocking a casualty with an AED - I'm not crazy or brave enough to try that though.

Jan 12, 2019 - 8:09:09 AM
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Wyozark

USA

578 posts since 12/2/2012

We often had tasers in our armory, however, like a lot of tools they had limited application. And to effectively use them one had to be proficient and knowledgeable in their use. This means training. And training can't be for just a few: anyone should be able to use them because in a 24 hour/7 operation there may be a need at one in the morning or on a holiday or any old time. But to train everyone who needs it means additional time away from the actual job. And when you are constantly short-handed it becomes expensive and difficult to get everyone trained consistently. It's not "once and done" training. So we had access to them, but I don't recall a situation where we actually used one. It was easier to bring in my specialty team to deal with the matter.

We also had a taser shield, which is even more specialized. It was a standard translucent riot shield, but had a taser built in the front that had a high-pitched start up sound and then crackle that unnerved people before it was ever put to use. Which meant we then didn't have to use it.

Here is a video that includes the use of the taser by officers.

National Geographic Lockdown - Newbies

In corrections if we use non-lethal force we often are required to be on the receiving end during training so that we understand the effects. For example, we know what pepper spray will do to a person because we have experienced it first hand. Ain't pleasant, I can tell ya...

Jan 12, 2019 - 9:57:41 AM
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Mooooo

USA

5445 posts since 8/20/2016

Learning about tasers like this makes me feel like someone being told for the first time that the Earth is round. I was also thinking of all the times I saw them use defibrillators on TV and said "Clear"... I assumed it should be the same for tasers. Now I have to rethink everything I know to be true. Is there gravity? Can I put my hand on a hot stove? Is it o.k. to poke a bear? So what if you shoot a fire hose at a line of cops using the electric shields? Will it be like throwing a radio into the bathtub? I should probably think before I type, but it's much funner not to.

Jan 12, 2019 - 10:16:26 AM
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172 posts since 4/22/2018

True story.... A friend of mine runs a B&B in the village I live in. A couple of years back a group of young men asked if they could use the hot tub in the garden, he said OK and then went out for the afternoon. When he came back, the group of guys were still in the tub but had got through a couple of slabs of beer and were very drunk very loud, and very lewd/swearing/cursing. My mate asked them to calm down and get out of the tub, to which they laughed at him and carried on as before with the noise etc.

Ten minutes later, my mate reappeared in the garden paying out three or four electrical extension cables he had daisy chained together with a toaster connected to the end,.....funnily enough the lads saw sense at this point and got out of the tub.

Jan 12, 2019 - 10:26:44 AM

Mooooo

USA

5445 posts since 8/20/2016

Now that is a brilliant and fun use of electricity. If it was me, just before throwing in the toaster, I would have yelled "Clear"...I guess I would have had the last laugh in that case.

Jan 12, 2019 - 2:13:07 PM

3713 posts since 11/29/2005

About an AED. YES! Mainly in the EMS sector. As a FF/EMT I was trained to be sure everybody was clear because usually you were working on the ground, and often it was damp. Any connection to ground (as applied in the electric sense) would give the current another path to completion, and the human body conducts electricity well.

CLEAR! (look at each person close to the victim to insure compliance, then push the button)

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