Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

366
Banjo Lovers Online


Want to hide these Google ads? Join the Players Union!
Jan 11, 2019 - 4:03:32 PM

mander

USA

2937 posts since 10/7/2007

We were talking about fight or flight response today.

Nature made me a fighter. Today, I'm short and flabby, there's no way I could out run an assailant, but even in my quick and youthful days, stand your ground was more my style. This doesn't have that much to do with "bravery." I do not consider myself "brave" so much as "unobservant." I am absurdly slow to recognize potential danger. In fact, usually, my first clue that something is amiss is when I notice I'm all alone and all my friends have disappeared. Oops.

Perhaps the most P.C. example I can offer is when I was in high school and a friend and I volunteered at the local zoo. We were given the highly enviable task of scrubbing clean the wolves outdoor enclosure when the wolves were in their indoor enclosure. The door between the two enclosures was open and closed by a pulley weight system, opening up from the bottom like a garage door on rollers. The wolves kept leaping on the pulleys and the door would open up and I was able to see the wolves staring at me. I told my friend repeatedly what the wolves were doing, but every time she turned around, the door had slipped back down, and she thought I was trying to frighten her. (And I would do this why?) So, I figured, she doesn't care, why should I? I continued to work. Then, the door happened to open while she was facing that way. She screamed, dropped her floor scraper and ran out of the enclosure. I stood there for a moment, wondering why she had left. It took me a couple of minutes of watching the door going up and down before I realized, oh, yeah, maybe I shouldn't be there either. Even then, I didn't leave because I was scared, but rather because I felt stupid to stay there.

So, I'm a fighter more because I lack the flight response, then because of any "bravery" issues.

How about you? Flight? Or Fight?

Jan 11, 2019 - 4:18:43 PM

8383 posts since 2/22/2007
Online Now

Well, I'm not outrunning anybody so "flight" is not an option for me, and I would hate to bet on my own fighting these days. So I rely on a combination of situational awareness, a pretty good gift of gab that has bluffed me out of some tough spots throughout the years, a couple of disabling moves from martial arts days kept in reserve, and if all else fails, perhaps concealed weapons. Perhaps. I'm also not above screaming for help!
But the response in the thread title is a big release of adrenaline, and dealing with that can make all of the above very difficult. It is very difficult to suddenly realize that you are in danger and not show any noticeable reaction, and sometimes that is exactly what you need to do.

Jan 11, 2019 - 4:28:20 PM
likes this

figmo59

USA

28588 posts since 3/5/2008

I ahvoid....

But given only 2 options of fight or flight....

Well...
The situation....dictates the treatment....

When I was on Coumadin.....
Me thinkin on this changed ..ah bit...
Only becose a simple ..poke in the nose...
Could be life threatening...


Or a simple ...tug..
On me L.V.A.D cable....would of done it...


Now I am a little more mobile...
So things change..

Jan 11, 2019 - 4:29 PM
likes this
Players Union Member

Chris Meakin

Australia

2193 posts since 5/15/2011

Depends. I've done both.

Jan 11, 2019 - 4:42:22 PM
likes this

403 posts since 11/17/2018

I don't have to outrun the bear...just you.

Jan 11, 2019 - 4:43:09 PM

Mooooo

USA

6210 posts since 8/20/2016
Online Now

Fight could mean talking your way out. Fighting with words, or outsmarting your opponent.

Jan 11, 2019 - 5:24:55 PM

403 posts since 11/17/2018

Study conducted at Emory University on flight or fight responses in combat veterans with PTSD...

news-medical.net/news/20170517...PTSD.aspx

Jan 11, 2019 - 8:11:17 PM

8828 posts since 8/22/2006
Online Now

Don't have to out run the bear just the other guy running next to me. I can honestly say I have never been in a situation that requires my fight or flight sensors to activate.

Jan 12, 2019 - 4:09:04 AM

4979 posts since 9/16/2004

... and sometimes there is no choice

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WAQZK5qjlOc&t=427s

Jan 12, 2019 - 4:17:09 AM
likes this

BConk

USA

17359 posts since 6/7/2005

I've done both... but I seem to excel at avoiding situations that force me to choose "fight or flight" long before they evolve into emergencies.

Life is simply too short to ever willingly deal with #$%$%&#s and a little experience in recognizing them goes a long way towards steering clear of them.

Jan 12, 2019 - 6:12:10 AM
like this
Players Union Member

DC5

USA

4472 posts since 6/30/2015

The reality is that each situation is different and we don't really know what we would do. In a sudden life threatening situation the brain stem takes over and there is minimal communication with the cerebrum. This is why most people don't remember what happened after the fact. When you do have time to think things are different. Police and soldiers are trained to deal with these situations, but even then when the unexpected happens the thinking part of the brain is put on hold while the preservation part takes over. In my younger days I hung around dangerous places. As I've gotten older I've learned to avoid them. When I see trouble start I leave early. If mugged the thief can have whatever he wants, but if I, or my wife or son are physically threatened, then it's no holds barred. Sometimes I carry, I'm always prepared, and I still have enough debilitating martial arts moves to use in an emergency. Mostly how to look at everything as a weapon.

Jan 12, 2019 - 12:16:47 PM
likes this

nakigreengrass

New Zealand

4287 posts since 5/16/2012

Most modern day stress and phobias ( and even carefulness ) are a result of the F or F response. So everyone experiences the FFR everyday of the week. In the modern context, It has actually not got much to do with whether you would stand and fight or run, as that would likely have to be a rational decision you would have to make depending on your chances of coming out OK. The FFR would more likely manifest itself leading up to any altercation, by raising your stress levels because of the situation you have found yourself in...e.g. entered a bad neighbor hood....walking down a dark alley...walking past a unsavory character etc.

You are unlikely to know how you would respond to any immediate danger, and that would vary throughout the stages of your life. Psychologists use the FFR as their basis for treating most stress related problems, and it's interesting to see how effective it works by lowering a persons primal fear stress threshold.

Edited by - nakigreengrass on 01/12/2019 12:17:29

Jan 12, 2019 - 3:33:55 PM
likes this

mander

USA

2937 posts since 10/7/2007

quote:
Originally posted by DC5

 Mostly how to look at everything as a weapon.


We're watching a movie last night and our son yells at the T.V. "Idiot! Never fight Jackie Chan in a room with furniture!"

Jan 12, 2019 - 11:09:03 PM
likes this
Players Union Member

Tommy5

USA

3245 posts since 2/22/2009

The FF response is pretty much useless to modern humans, in 99.9 % of stressful situations neither fighting or fleeing is an appropriate or even a possible response. You can’t can’t beat up the doctor that tells you that you or a loved one had a tumor, you can’t fight the boss that says there is going to be cutback in production and changes are going to have to be made, traffic frustrations can’t or shouldn’t be resolved by violence or running away. The constant anxiety and frustration these situations cause can reek havoc on your state of mind and have serious physical complications. The simple fight or flight situation of say a person trying to rob you is child’s play compared to the problems caused by long term chronic stress. If you could simply fight or flee from your troubles as early man could, then the FF response would be a positive thing , this response while helpful to early man is deadly to modern folks , you can’t run away or fight yourself and for too many the only relief from their misery is the sweet sleep of death, sad, so sad.

Jan 12, 2019 - 11:51:20 PM
likes this

nakigreengrass

New Zealand

4287 posts since 5/16/2012

quote:
Originally posted by Tommy5

you can’t run away or fight yourself and for too many the only relief from their misery is the sweet sleep of death, sad, so sad.


I've got a great interest in human anachronistic evolutionary traits.  And the fight and flight instinct is a doozy.  I think if people realized fully the extent that we are all still governed by primal instincts, if would be very helpful for improving mental heath in general.

I am convinced that the growing negative mental health stats are caused mainly by the fact that technological evolution accelerated ahead of biological evolution.  This means we are often in a prolonged state of heightened alertness that we can not fight against or flee from ( as you said ) 

Jan 13, 2019 - 3:54:34 AM

2901 posts since 12/6/2009

when I was younger I was always a good size and I practiced for years in front of a mirror doing my Sonny Liston stare.....no one ever screwed with me.....now???? I agree with every one with a smile.......and learned how to say.....yes sir yes sir or yes mam yes mam

Jan 14, 2019 - 11:12:39 AM
likes this

8thpol

USA

5412 posts since 3/3/2005

Most major beat downs I have endured came as a result of a Horse using its natural Flight mechanism

Jan 15, 2019 - 12:53 PM
likes this

937 posts since 9/13/2018
Online Now

Once as a teenager at my 1st place, some guy came at me while I was just sitting with a friend on a park bench outside.He wanted money, and he wanted it right now. He also had a hatchet in his hand and was in a swinging mood. We chose flight, for at least a quarter mile. We told the cops, to little avail. I learned don’t bring cigarettes and a beer to a hatchet fight

Bruce

Jan 15, 2019 - 12:57:33 PM
Players Union Member

Chris Meakin

Australia

2193 posts since 5/15/2011

quote:
Originally posted by nakigreengrass
quote:
Originally posted by Tommy5

you can’t run away or fight yourself and for too many the only relief from their misery is the sweet sleep of death, sad, so sad.


I've got a great interest in human anachronistic evolutionary traits.  And the fight and flight instinct is a doozy.  I think if people realized fully the extent that we are all still governed by primal instincts, if would be very helpful for improving mental heath in general.

I am convinced that the growing negative mental health stats are caused mainly by the fact that technological evolution accelerated ahead of biological evolution.  This means we are often in a prolonged state of heightened alertness that we can not fight against or flee from ( as you said ) 

 


Too right. Most nations still keep annual stats on the number of people killed by or in cars; and apparently it (death by vehicular crash) is the leading cause of death among people aged between 15 and 29 years world wide.

Edited by - Chris Meakin on 01/15/2019 13:09:28

Jan 15, 2019 - 1:46:08 PM
likes this

Tobus

USA

1780 posts since 11/17/2015

quote:
Originally posted by 8thpol

Most major beat downs I have endured came as a result of a Horse using its natural Flight mechanism


Yup, me too.  I've got a plate and 11 screws in my wrist as a result of the horse's flight mechanism.  I have amazingly slow reflexes (my brain continues to want to gather information rather than react one way or another).  Horses don't suffer from over-analyzing the situation, and they don't care who's in the way when they decide to get outta Dodge.

I think we're missing an important new human development, though.  The modern human has evolved a third mechanism, and the behavioralists need to update their info.  Now it's fight, flight, or whip out your cell phone to capture it on video.

Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.40625