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How to repair a small veneer delamination?

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Dec 8, 2018 - 4:28:43 PM
552 posts since 2/26/2007

Attached are photos of a small delamination in the veneer occurring at the resonator neck notch of a ball bearing mastertone. I would like to stabilize it before it gets snagged on something and creates a bigger problem. I have found this in the archives...

Running Glue Into Opened Lamination

Is titebond the prefered glue for this, and is a syringe the best method of applying it?

Should I get this to a pro or is this something that can be done by myself?


Dec 8, 2018 - 6:26:25 PM

7035 posts since 1/7/2005

your banjo was probably built with hot hide glue. That's what I would use. Or Franklin's liquid hide glue. Only hide glue will stick properly to old hide glue.
I'd flow in some thin hide glue, and clamp it shut. When it is dry, you can scrub off any excess squeeze out with a damp cloth.
Easy stuff.

DD

Dec 8, 2018 - 6:30:17 PM

beegee

USA

21022 posts since 7/6/2005
Online Now

I agree on the hot glue. I've never had much success with the liquid hide glue. If you have no access to hot hide glue buy a pack of Knox gelatin at the grocery store and mix up a small batch. Wick it into the delamination with a soft artist's brush or a syringe. Clamp well and leave it alone for 24 hours.

Dec 8, 2018 - 6:53 PM
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Players Union Member

Helix

USA

11675 posts since 8/30/2006

I would not be afraid to use Titebond One and gravity, just let the glue run down into split, then clamp and wipe of the excess while it's wet.
I've begun to use 70% isopropyl in a spray bottle for a whole bunch of stuff here, including hands.
Here's a picture of a banjo mute made by reversing the blades of a clothespin. Great clamp


Dec 8, 2018 - 7:00:54 PM

5316 posts since 8/28/2013

I have found that Titebond doesn't stick well to the hide glues in use in the 1920's. Hide glue will.

Dec 8, 2018 - 7:14 PM

Bill Rogers (Moderator)

USA

21533 posts since 6/25/2005

Depends on how much dust & assorted fung has gotten in there. The more garbage, the less chance hide glue will grab. My preference would be Titebond. Work it in with a super-thin artisr’s palette knife. So you ‘ll have to make a judgment based on the condition of the delamination.

Dec 9, 2018 - 6:41:24 AM

5316 posts since 8/28/2013

Dust dirt and fung (whatever that is) will inhibit the chance of any glue grabbing.

Dec 11, 2018 - 1:51:03 AM
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1251 posts since 10/22/2003

Although it is possible to stabilize this yourself, a good repair shop will probably do a better job at hiding the repair, so it depends on whether or not looks are important to you. I would email the photo to the repair shop at Elderly and see what they say before I did any work. They are very friendly and it will cost you nothing. Mailing the resonator is much easier than mailing a whole instrument if you do not have a great repair shop near your home.

Dec 11, 2018 - 8:29:56 AM
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1251 posts since 10/22/2003

In the short run, you could cover it with painter's tape to keep it from being snagged on something. Not a pretty solution, but very reversible.

Dec 12, 2018 - 5:13:53 AM

552 posts since 2/26/2007

I did a little research on blue painters tape. It's not as inert as thought! Be careful out there!!!surprise

WARNING, Masking tape and nitro finishes do not mix!

Dec 13, 2018 - 7:38:54 PM
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1251 posts since 10/22/2003

Thanks for letting me know. I was not aware this could cause problems and I apologize for that.
I feel bad because I could have led you astray, but I have left blue tape on all sorts of finishes for very long periods of time with no problem, so I wouldn't have suggested it if I didn't have experience. Again, I am truly sorry.

Dec 14, 2018 - 8:32:13 AM

552 posts since 2/26/2007

quote:
Originally posted by DantheBanjoMan

Thanks for letting me know. I was not aware this could cause problems and I apologize for that.
I feel bad because I could have led you astray, but I have left blue tape on all sorts of finishes for very long periods of time with no problem, so I wouldn't have suggested it if I didn't have experience. Again, I am truly sorry.


Hey DantheBanjoMan? No worries!!! Life happens. It may have been fine in a 24 clamp use. Holding a song list for 12 months on the resonator may produce different results. I have followed and recommended less than the best advice myself. It's all a learning process. As much as I can, for the rest of my life, I intend on extending grace in all directions and having a heart that is not easily offended. Have a wonderful Christmas and be blessed!!!

Dec 16, 2018 - 4:50:29 PM
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19 posts since 5/10/2016

You can clean the joint up before gluing with Naphtha. Apply a liberal amount of Naphtha with an eye dropper to flush out the crack. Let it sit for a couple hours for the Naphtha to evaporate completely.
For glue use either hot hide glue or fish glue is also good. Make sure the glue is thinned well so it flows completely through the crack. Clean off excess glue with a damp rag or sponge. Apply wax paper and clamp with one or two cam clamps. Leave under clamp pressure for a minimum of 12 hours. Remove clamps and clean up dried glue ooze with a damp rag or sponge.
Jim

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