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TOTW 12/07/18 - Boys My Money’s All Gone in D

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Dec 6, 2018 - 6:45:21 PM
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78 posts since 8/30/2015

For this TOTW I am featuring a version of  Boys My Money's All Gone in D. This is not the more common version of the tune in A. So that version in A can be featured by someone in a future Tune Of The Week. 

I learned this version of the tune in last winter at the Gardner Winter Music Fest in Morgantown, WV from Andy Porter, who lives in Washington, D.C. Andy says he learned it from PA fiddler Todd Clewell, who, in turn, learned it from his wife. It can also be found in the Portland Collection, volume 2. Beyond that, the origin of this tune under this title is pretty fuzzy at best. Nevertheless, it’s a really fun and  lively tune worth learning and passing on. 

In a previous search I didn't find any background information on the web. Since then there seems to be a short page on the Tunearch site.  https://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Boys_My_Money%27s_All_Gone_(2

The banjo only TOTW video below is my first attempt at recording myself on my computer, so be gentle ~or not.  angel I kept the speed moderate so it’s easier to follow along and hear the melody.

In the jam video (Paul Kirk’s TOTW), I’m playing a semi-fretless Richard banjo and play the B part high most of the time. In that video  Paul Kirk plays Fiddle, and Bill Braun plays Guitar. I’ve also included a link of The Battleaxe Band playing this version of the tune.

Paul Kirk & Friends: https://youtu.be/ZWH79wvFTYo   Battleaxe Band: https://youtu.be/1QF5nyyUxik

Special thanks to Timm Reasbeck with assisting with tablature details.I added a 2nd tab file showing just the B part played down and octave. There are a few oddities in how I play the tune. Hopefully between the tablature and the slower banjo video that will all make sense.


Dec 6, 2018 - 11:33:32 PM
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Bill Rogers (Moderator)

USA

21450 posts since 6/25/2005

So really, there are two different tunes that share a name. Anyone have an idea where either originated?

Dec 7, 2018 - 2:41:38 AM
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cmic

France

149 posts since 4/17/2010

Very well played, Stephen. I also like your cluck.
Cheers.

Dec 7, 2018 - 4:23:06 AM
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Cyndy

USA

579 posts since 3/2/2010

Nice write-up on a nice tune. Something about it takes my fancy and I think I’ll have to give it a try. I suspect it might end up falling into the “addictive little thing “ category and I love it when that happens! :)

Dec 7, 2018 - 5:25:05 AM

78 posts since 8/30/2015

quote:
Originally posted by Bill Rogers

So really, there are two different tunes that share a name. Anyone have an idea where either originated?


The original version in A appears to have been sourced to a recorded medley from 1929. This is from that page on the Tunearch site:

BOYS, MY MONEY'S ALL GONE [1]. Old-Time, Breakdown. A Dorian or Mixolydian/Dorian. Standard tuning (fiddle). AABB.

Old-Time versions of "Money in Both Pockets" are sourced to a February, 1929, recording by East Tennessee fiddler Charlie Bowman [1](1889-1962) and His Brothers, called "Moonshiner and His Money", which was Columbia Records first entree into recording early country music. "Moonshiner and His Money" was a skit with music, along the lines of the Skillet Licker's successful similar recordings. There were two tunes played in between banter, "Money in Both Pockets (3)" and "Boys My Money's All Gone (1)."

Dec 7, 2018 - 6:17:41 AM
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carlb

USA

1889 posts since 12/16/2007

quote:
Originally posted by Bill Rogers

So really, there are two different tunes that share a name. Anyone have an idea where either originated?


I've always thought that the Charlie Bowman version, in A, was just another version of "Paddy on the Turnpike" or "Paddy on the Handcar".

Dec 7, 2018 - 6:54:42 AM

78 posts since 8/30/2015

quote:

I've always thought that the Charlie Bowman version, in A, was just another version of "Paddy on the Turnpike" or "Paddy on the Handcar".

I think your right. It does sound like that. Given the banter and skit like nature of that recording, I wouldn't be surprised if they just renamed their version to suit the moment.

Dec 7, 2018 - 10:23:26 AM
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R Buck

USA

2561 posts since 9/5/2006

Yeah Charlie Bowman played in A and I like there better but don't tell my wife, Amy, as she plays in it the Battleaxe Band having learned it from Barb Schmid, Todd Clewell's wife.

Dec 8, 2018 - 3:02:51 PM
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6064 posts since 6/27/2009

That's a great tune, all right, Stephen. Your group has the old-time sound I most enjoy listening to. Thanks for the tab and your solo work to help learn it. I tried investigating more the older source. Charlie Bowman's 1929 recording is like Paddy on the Turnpike, as Carl says, but also has a relationship to your tune.  I haven't tried playing them on top of each other (and therefore having to change the key of one of them), but some of the parts, especially in the B part, would go nicely together. The other sources listed in the Traditional Tune Archive are hard to get ahold of. Perhaps someone else has them to share.


Dec 8, 2018 - 5:17:02 PM
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78 posts since 8/30/2015

Nice job Janet! Love that deep melodic sound your banjo has.

Dec 8, 2018 - 7:40:10 PM
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Bill Rogers (Moderator)

USA

21450 posts since 6/25/2005

Yeah, I think the D version may well have evolved from Bowman’s, which I’ve long thought of as simply an A version of “Paddy...,” which is usually played in G. The NLCR rendering of Bowman’s “Boys...” is remarkably similar to Steam Machine’s version of “Paddy.”

Dec 9, 2018 - 2:56:23 AM
Players Union Member

janolov

Sweden

39053 posts since 3/7/2006

quote:
Originally posted by Bill Rogers

Yeah, I think the D version may well have evolved from Bowman’s, which I’ve long thought of as simply an A version of “Paddy...,” which is usually played in G. The NLCR rendering of Bowman’s “Boys...” is remarkably similar to Steam Machine’s version of “Paddy.”


Isn't Steam Machine later than NLCR? So it would be better to say Steam Machine’s version of “Paddy” is remarkably similar to NLCR rendering of Bowman’s “Boys...”?

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