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Free rides with Uber and Lyft to polling places!

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Oct 12, 2018 - 6:12:04 AM
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2114 posts since 10/9/2011

Uber and Lyft are offering FREE rides to polling places on election day to those who have no other transportation. Now there's no excuse not to vote! Please do not make political comments here and get the thread locked. All Americans should see this.

Oct 12, 2018 - 10:57:16 AM
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KE

Malta

22832 posts since 6/30/2006

That's a very civic-minded offer from Uber and Lyft. I know churches and other civic organizations arrange transportation as well.

Oct 12, 2018 - 11:26:39 AM
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Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

21722 posts since 8/3/2003

I agree, everyone should go out and vote their conscience .... and let's not make this controversial, it's just good citizenship.

Oct 12, 2018 - 11:36:10 AM

donc

Canada

5560 posts since 2/9/2010
Online Now

Avoiding dark streets may get a few more people out to vote.

Oct 12, 2018 - 12:03:06 PM
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figmo59

USA

27956 posts since 3/5/2008

If you do not vote...
Do Not Gripe...

Oct 12, 2018 - 1:11:42 PM
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Owen

Canada

2485 posts since 6/5/2011

I'm not in the "didn't vote / don't criticize" group...    If that thinking is to prevail, then I should have no say on issues regarding murder.    I  hope I can look at an opinion  or proposal or critique on it's merit, not on whether or not the guy voted.    What if a terrific idea comes from somebody too young to vote? 

What of "declined ballots"?

Edited by - Owen on 10/12/2018 13:15:11

Oct 12, 2018 - 1:12:45 PM

mander

USA

2431 posts since 10/7/2007

I saw a cartoon once showing people in a foreign country risking gunfire to reach the voting polls in one panel, and an USA voting booth with cobwebs on it with no one there in the other. It really is discouraging how few people go to the polls in this country.

Oct 12, 2018 - 1:33:54 PM
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Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

21722 posts since 8/3/2003

quote:
Originally posted by Owen

I'm not in the "didn't vote / don't criticize" group...    If that thinking is to prevail, then I should have no say on issues regarding murder.    I  hope I can look at an opinion  or proposal or critique on it's merit, not on whether or not the guy voted.    What if a terrific idea comes from somebody too young to vote? 

What of "declined ballots"?


It's just the principle of the thing:  if you don't go to the ballot box and voice your opinion there, then you have no right to complain because it didn't pass/go through or whatever else we can't talk about here on the Hangout. 

Oct 12, 2018 - 1:35:40 PM
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1012 posts since 1/31/2011

Thanks for not locking this.

Oct 12, 2018 - 2:34:18 PM
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Owen

Canada

2485 posts since 6/5/2011

Sherry,  could you explain what/where the "principle" is?   It seems to me that "didn't vote = no right to speak up" is an opinion rather than a principle.    Does the "principle" apply in the other two example I cited... murder and young people?   What if someone, for some unforeseen circumstance, was unable to vote on both advance polling and the actual election day?   When a person gains citizenship or becomes old enough to vote, or even moves into an electoral district, should he/she have to remain silent until he first expresses his opinion at the ballot box?  Does the "principle" also apply if a person wants to say something agreeable or complimentary, or just if it's in disagreement or criticizing?   

FWIW, I'm very much pro voting... particularly if the voter is well-informed.

Edited by - Owen on 10/12/2018 14:50:11

Oct 12, 2018 - 3:34:25 PM
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Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

21722 posts since 8/3/2003

I have hidden a post that got into politics as far as parties and voting are concerned. Let's try to keep it uncontroversial, if we can.

Owen, you don't get to vote on whether someone is a murderer or not unless you sit on a jury, so that argument is null and void. We're talking about voting for what you think is right, not whether someone is guilty or innocent. As far as I'm concerned, there's one heck of a difference in the two items.

If you don't vote, in my opinion, you have no right to complain. There's early voting, absentee voting, mail in voting, etc., so usually, unless there's an accident or serious illness, you can manage to vote when it's available to do so. A couple of years ago, I got my husband out of a sick bed in a nursing home and drove him to the voting place just so he could vote. He couldn't walk, I couldn't lift him, I didn't have a wheel chair for him so the people taking care of the voting place brought out a portable machine. In other words, where there's a will, there's a way.

Oct 12, 2018 - 3:34:40 PM

Owen

Canada

2485 posts since 6/5/2011

Re. unacceptable choices... in MB  [I haven't checked into other provinces, or municipal elections] we can "decline" our ballot.  Can't do it federally however. One shows up at the voting place and tells the dude in charge that one wants to "decline my ballot."   You get marked off as having voted, and the election results show the number of declined ballots along with the other customary results.  The express message in a declined is: "None of the candidates on this ballot is worthy of my vote."   I'd like to see widespread use of the tactic, IF it's warranted.... alas I think too many people who put party before the common good wouldn't go for it.  

Oct 12, 2018 - 3:54:31 PM
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8048 posts since 2/22/2007

Sherry, it's your call of course, but I disagree that my post was political. The issue was "vote or don't complain" and I listed reasons why I disagree with that. In fact, I essentially said what Owen said and we posted at the same time. My post was not for or against any party or candidate or issue, it was only about our limited choices and the reasons for that.
To keep a discussion non-controversial it seems that the only allowed response would be to agree? That's not much of a discussion. I'm not complaining about how you moderate, you are fair and even-handed here and I agree that ====sometimes!======I do cross the line. I do not agree that this was one of those times.

Oct 12, 2018 - 3:57:46 PM
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8048 posts since 2/22/2007

I do wonder how the Uber/Lyft drivers will get paid for their free rides? The rideshare companies are not known for generosity towards their drivers.

Oct 12, 2018 - 4:14:30 PM
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Owen

Canada

2485 posts since 6/5/2011

....ah, yes... extrapolation.   In my example about "murder" there are many facets aside from guilt/innocence.  You'd have me believe that a person who doesn't vote has no valid opinion on whether there should be mandatory sentences for murder, or whether concurrent sentences should be considered, or whether a convicted murderer should get "special" treatment while in prison  [to randomly pick a few examples that pop to mind]?  

Since extrapolation apparently is the way to go, consider this:  A person and his wife are fully intent on voting at the regular poll, so have foregone the mail-in, the advanced poll, etc. options.  Come election day, one of them has just been put into a medically induced coma.   Does this single example have the same weight as yours, Sherry?   When that person recovers, he/she should have no right to speak up?

How about the other examples I cited?

It seems to me the right to speak up should be right up there next to the basic human rights... not dependent on whether or not one voted.

Edit:  Bill-e I agree with some  [but not all] of  your post about the gist of our posts... only half a "like."  wink

Edited by - Owen on 10/12/2018 16:19:14

Oct 12, 2018 - 10:27:52 PM
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806 posts since 2/4/2013

I disagree with the "If you don't vote you have no right to complain"

If you take no interest in the world and don't vote then you can't complain. Sometimes not voting is the only option. There might be no one worthy of voting for. I'm all for the "none of the above" option. Sometimes it's best not to encourage them.

I always vote though.

Oct 13, 2018 - 2:19:19 AM
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Players Union Member

Nels

USA

5326 posts since 12/10/2012

To vote or not is a private matter. To" complain" /speak out on an issue is freedom of speech and is not dependent on voting.

Oct 13, 2018 - 6:29:31 AM

Owen

Canada

2485 posts since 6/5/2011

quote:
Originally posted by GrahamHawker

I disagree with the "If you don't vote you have no right to complain"

If you take no interest in the world and don't vote then you can't complain. Sometimes not voting is the only option. There might be no one worthy of voting for. I'm all for the "none of the above" option. Sometimes it's best not to encourage them.

I always vote though.


It's good to know that...  at least now we know your opinion is valid.... at least in the UK. ...   wink

Oct 13, 2018 - 7:12:13 AM
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KE

Malta

22832 posts since 6/30/2006

In the St. Louis Art Museum is a series of three paintings by Missouri artist George Caleb Bingham. It is called "The Election Series" and depicts scenes from the decade prior to the Civil War of campaigning (stump speaking), the election on the courthouse steps, and the pronouncement of the outcome. (The latter painting was hung behind the dais for the luncheon of the last presidential inauguration.)

It's noteworthy that the paintings are populated with white males of all ages, different social classes and wealth, levels of sobriety, etc. Absent are people of color, except for one manservant dispensing the liquor offered as an enticement for a candidate. Absent are females, except in the last scene where a group of women are on a distant balcony with a flag of the Women's Christian Temperance Union. They, of course, had no vote.

The point is -- those women on the balcony did not vote, and were still involved in the issues of the day. Today, there are people who do not vote, and are 'disenfranchised' because we continue to maintain selective conditions that make it difficult to do so. Should they not be allowed to complain because they didn't vote?

That's why these efforts to assist people in voting are important, and why it's necessary to remove other barriers to exercising our rights as citizens.

Edited by - KE on 10/13/2018 07:14:21

Oct 13, 2018 - 7:52:32 AM
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1643 posts since 2/16/2017

I agree that not being a presented with a candidate worthy of my vote is a serious and frequent issue.

The way I view it, though, is that if you do not vote for the lesser of 2 evils, then you are helping the greater of 2 evils.

So get out and vote!

Oct 13, 2018 - 4:32:40 PM
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5673 posts since 3/11/2006

There is a long complicated history for voting rights in this country.

There was a requirement for example that barred non-property owners (Whites included) from voting. Though the states began to eliminate this as early as 1792, the last state (NC) did not do so until 1856. Women and free-born  Blacks had the right to vote early on, but it waslater rescinded. Due to poll taxes and literacy tests, by 1941 there were more disenfranchised Whites than Blacks in Alabama. So though as KE says, in Bingham's painting;

"It's noteworthy that the paintings are populated with white males of all ages, different social classes and wealth, levels of sobriety, etc."

This wouldn't have been the case in many areas of the U.S. at that time and even much later.

I also don't agree that no vote equals no right to express an opinion. Under the current electoral system, multiple thousands of votes are rendered ineffective. If I can't get to the polls until after the media has already called my state, I may just decide to head for home instead.
Not coming out against the electoral college... just saying.

Oct 13, 2018 - 4:53:41 PM

8048 posts since 2/22/2007

I also know a couple who are polar opposites politically and whose votes would always cancel each other out, so both agreed to just stay home!

Oct 13, 2018 - 5:13:47 PM

4830 posts since 9/16/2004

Wasn't my fault that I lost my apartment and car... just a few of bad choices... but at least now, I'll be able to vote. Thank you Uber and Lyft.

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