Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

326
Banjo Lovers Online


Want to hide these Google ads? Join the Players Union!
Oct 12, 2018 - 4:46:28 AM
Players Union Member

Puppy

Canada

16 posts since 2/16/2017

I would like to send out thoughts and prayers to all those who have been impacted by Hurricane Michael.

Oct 12, 2018 - 4:48:38 AM

mander

USA

2449 posts since 10/7/2007

Is it just me, or does Hurricane/Tornado season last longer and longer, with more more destructive storms?

Oct 12, 2018 - 5:03:43 AM
like this

49209 posts since 12/14/2005

It's just YOU.
There is NO relationship between global warming and storms, because, according to various people in positions of wealth and power, there is no global warming.
So there! cheeky

Oct 12, 2018 - 5:13:41 AM
like this

R Buck

USA

2521 posts since 9/5/2006

We are relatively unscathed, 4" of rain in 12 hours, in our area but it was the first time the upstate and Greenville ever were hit by a tropical storm. It seems that even the weather people are surprised by this storm and how rapidly it developed under circumstances that would usually diminish its power. Something is going on.

Edited by - R Buck on 10/12/2018 05:23:13

Oct 12, 2018 - 5:24:54 AM

1220 posts since 8/3/2012

yep, it's just you.
Hurricane season has historically been June through October, so an early October hurricane is not unusual.
Tornado season is typically March - June.


Prayers to all those affected by Michael'

Oct 12, 2018 - 6:43:42 AM
like this

805 posts since 2/10/2013

The timing of the latest hurricane was not unusual, but an unusually warm gulf produced the strongest recorded hurricane for that area. Generally speaking, America does not prepare for disasters, it reacts to them. Maybe Costa Rica is doing the right thing by restricting any type development in close proximity to the ocean. I would much rather enjoy those beaches than the crowded high rises that surrounded beaches on some areas of the gulf coast.

Shoddy construction contributes to the degree of hurricane damage. Trees around structures are not trimmed and maintained, so limbs and trees debris cause structural damage.

I doubt it, but FEMA and local disaster management personnel should work with having different southeastern states to develop reciprocal programs for transportation and temporary shelters during emergencies. A plan for the use of transportation facilities could be developed. As time goes by, areas are being subjected to more and more development and the likelihood of damage increases. You don't have to move people that far to get them out of harms way. And unlike tornadoes, hurricanes don't come out of nowhere.

Finally, hurricanes don't run on a schedule. After a recent storm, not Michael, a home remarked he has just undergone his second "storm of a lifetime" during a two year periods. Don't get me started on re nourishing beaches. Nature created some of those great beaches with wave action, and she removes them at her leisure.

Oct 12, 2018 - 6:57:47 AM
likes this

1886 posts since 7/28/2015

Oct 12, 2018 - 7:19:04 AM

671 posts since 12/2/2013

At the risk of making a "political" remark, I think so much of the problem is our respect for individual property rights and property insurance. Why should I reimburse someone for building in a known flood-prone zone time and again. Forgive me for seeming to be cruel/uncaring, but homes destroyed by Michael should NOT be rebuillt: we should cover the property loss but tell the owners to re-build elsewhere.

Oct 12, 2018 - 7:24:29 AM
like this

13589 posts since 12/2/2005

It's not just you, Sally - many people share your belief. They are equally incorrect.

There have been some good stats and facts posted by others, so I won't repeat them. I've long been interested in hurricanes in part due to the fact that I was born during one - Hurricane Carol, August 31, 1954. That storm wreaked havoc on southern New England, and that decade is tied for second place for the most-active hurricane season since they got serious about keeping records. As Frank's chart shows, there was a comparative lull for the next four decades.

And in the meantime, more and more people got the itch to live close to the water. Where I now live on Cape Cod, there was a year-round population of 41,000 in 1950. Today, the year round population is around 225,000 - a five fold increase, and that doesn't even count the hundreds of thousands of people who show up in the summer, many of whom own second homes here.

The Cape is hurricane-vulnerable (which I consider preferable to living in the shadow of an active volcano, like you do - at least we know a few days out if we should beat feet) though not as much as the Gulf Coast, Florida and the Carolinas. Like many of those areas, we build on sand, and sand is constantly shifting.

The bottom line is that there aren't more storms, nor are they measurably more powerful, despite what the media hype and alarmists may claim. The fact is that hurricanes are destructive, and there are a LOT more people living within their impact zones than there once were.

And remember - as one of my meteorologist buddies is fond of pointing out - "Mother Nature loves her averages."

Edited by - eagleisland on 10/12/2018 07:25:27

Oct 12, 2018 - 9:05:08 AM
like this

8057 posts since 2/22/2007

David posted---", I think so much of the problem is our respect for individual property rights and property insurance. Why should I reimburse someone for building in a known flood-prone zone time and again. --"

You are correct in your feelings of injustice but a bit off in your choice of target. The issue is not "private property rights" or even insurance. As long as it's private insurance then you do not have to be affected or participate. If you don't want to share those costs then do not choose an insurer who underwrites such risks. The problem is that Federal Flood Insurance makes ALL of us underwrite those losses and we have no choice in the matter. The Feds subsidize the developers and sellers of those high-risk properties so that they reap the profits and the entire country covers the risk. Without that, much that has been built would have never been built. Or, something very different would have been built but whatever was built would have been built with private funds and at the developer's own risk. So it's not the private sector that is the problem here. It's the intrusion of the public into the private for the benefit of the well-connected that is the problem. As usual.

Oct 12, 2018 - 9:35:16 AM

8159 posts since 1/15/2005

quote:
Originally posted by eagleisland

It's not just you, Sally - many people share your belief. They are equally incorrect.

There have been some good stats and facts posted by others, so I won't repeat them. I've long been interested in hurricanes in part due to the fact that I was born during one - Hurricane Carol, August 31, 1954. That storm wreaked havoc on southern New England, and that decade is tied for second place for the most-active hurricane season since they got serious about keeping records. As Frank's chart shows, there was a comparative lull for the next four decades.

And in the meantime, more and more people got the itch to live close to the water. Where I now live on Cape Cod, there was a year-round population of 41,000 in 1950. Today, the year round population is around 225,000 - a five fold increase, and that doesn't even count the hundreds of thousands of people who show up in the summer, many of whom own second homes here.

The Cape is hurricane-vulnerable (which I consider preferable to living in the shadow of an active volcano, like you do - at least we know a few days out if we should beat feet) though not as much as the Gulf Coast, Florida and the Carolinas. Like many of those areas, we build on sand, and sand is constantly shifting.

The bottom line is that there aren't more storms, nor are they measurably more powerful, despite what the media hype and alarmists may claim. The fact is that hurricanes are destructive, and there are a LOT more people living within their impact zones than there once were.

And remember - as one of my meteorologist buddies is fond of pointing out - "Mother Nature loves her averages."


You are right on target Skip!  Next year if we get a lull in hurricanes, we can go back to shark attacks! 

PS:  I do not mean to diminish the damage and suffering caused by Michael or any other storm.  Like Bob said, we got 4" of rain and not much wind.  I don't think he is correct that this is the first tropical storm to reach the upstate (even if it was classified as that when it reached us).  We got a lot more rain from a hurricane that came up from the gulf a number years ago, as well as from Hugo, the best I recall.

Edited by - BanjoLink on 10/12/2018 09:41:57

Oct 12, 2018 - 10:32:33 AM
like this

KE

Malta

22838 posts since 6/30/2006

Sending some cash to relief organizations would be a whole lot more helpful and appreciated than thoughts and prayers. Just sayin

Oct 12, 2018 - 1:51:03 PM

8159 posts since 1/15/2005

quote:
Originally posted by KE

Sending some cash to relief organizations would be a whole lot more helpful and appreciated than thoughts and prayers. Just sayin


Why not do both?

Oct 12, 2018 - 8:24:37 PM

4423 posts since 9/5/2006

i am about 240 miles from the coast ,, florence about 4 weeks ago we got 8 inches of rain 5 which fell on a sunday night,,basement flooded,,,,, yesterday while we were at the beach,,, michael rolls through dumps 7 inches in just a few hours,,, basement flooded when we got home today.... we have not had water in the basement in over 5 years. its getting old... i know a flooded basement is nothing compared to the hell that some a dealing with ,,, but it still gets old. we got some investigating to do to find the entry point = $$$$$




terry m

Edited by - 1935tb-11 on 10/12/2018 20:25:59

Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.125