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Jun 14, 2018 - 8:47:42 AM
4273 posts since 9/5/2006

i am hoping to retire in 15 months at age 62,, i have an out on insurance through my wifes company who has great insurance. about 340 a month for me. with my back and knee issues i don't think i can last much longer at what i do now then 15 months,,,kinda being forced to retire because of the issues.
was wondering who else has been or is in the same boat and do you regret doing it or was it the best thing you ever done?




terry m

Jun 14, 2018 - 9:08:22 AM
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Owen

Canada

2113 posts since 6/5/2011

I think Gordie Howe was around 62 when he finally retired.     devil

Jun 14, 2018 - 9:22:55 AM
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Brian T

Canada

13821 posts since 6/5/2008
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I taught college courses for more than 30 years. Took 2 years to untangle myself and walk out.
I handed in my April final grades, handed in my office keys and walked out at age 60.
I bailed out of the city for my bigger mountain house with 1/2 price Cost Of Living.
I can't see much of a reduction in village Public Works services, summer and winter.

I have no regrets at all. Cities are noisy and they usually stink. Still fun to visit for shopping.
The End.

Jun 14, 2018 - 9:32:13 AM

donc

Canada

5440 posts since 2/9/2010

I went at 62. I had been there over 38 years. For me it was the perfect time to leave. I had been offered a smaller retirement buy-out at age 55 but I realized it was too small and too early. 65 would have been too long to wait .

Jun 14, 2018 - 9:32:33 AM

898 posts since 1/16/2010
Online Now

What line of work are you in Terry? I wish you luck, hope you can make it. Shame how hard we have to work in this country to make it, and then when it’s time to go, our bodies are all broken and worn out.

I can retire from the railroad at age 60 with full benefits as long as I have 30 years of service. I’ll be 60 in 24 years with....I don’t even know how I’m going to make it the rest of the week let alone 24 years.....seems like a bad dream I can’t snap out of.

Jun 14, 2018 - 9:40:24 AM
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Tommy5

USA

2924 posts since 2/22/2009

Retired at 62 after 37 years of teaching, 32, teaching special ed. It was time to enjoy life before getting too old to enjoy life, I recommend retiring to everybody, my health is better, I exercise, three or four days a week, go to two or three jams a week,play banjo everyday, entertain at old folks homes, do outreach with my telescope,travel, fortunately my wife has great health insurance at her job and I will soon be old enough for Medicare,teacher pensions are great, they are modeled after the private pensions folks used to get after decades of faithful service and paying a piece of your paycheck to a fund, sad that these retirement plans are going out of style.

Jun 14, 2018 - 9:54:13 AM

4273 posts since 9/5/2006

we don't have any pensions at where i work,, just 401 and last year had to dip into it to pay some doctor bills and lately to keep things going here at home since i been out 4 months.. its just a tough call ,, but it got the point to where after work it was all i could do to walk out to the truck and get in... the knees were screaming ,, back was like a knife in it... the back is slightly better ,,knees so so ,, shots don't last very long.



terry m

Jun 14, 2018 - 10:03:15 AM

Banjo Lefty

Canada

1175 posts since 6/19/2014

I retired at 62. Best thing I ever did. I would have retired even earlier, at 55, but I wanted to build up the pension.

Jun 14, 2018 - 10:03:18 AM

1361 posts since 9/12/2016

love it

Jun 14, 2018 - 10:04:59 AM
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bluenote23

Canada

931 posts since 12/4/2012

I stopped working 5 1/2 years ago at age 60. Almost every day, I say to myself 'why didn't you do it sooner?'

That said, I was very fortunate and can afford to not work. I own my house and since I don't work, my daily expenses have gone way down.

I play music in the morning, ride my bike for a couple of hours, play some more music after that and there never seems to be enough hours in a day. I feel so lucky.

Jun 14, 2018 - 10:29:56 AM

940 posts since 1/31/2011

62 is still several years away and healthcare is the only thing holding back. With the latest try to repeal preexisting conditions it's not looking good though at the moment I'm healthy, just starting to creak. The thought of getting a part time job for benefits makes no sense, may as well stay where I am since I don't mind the work.

Jun 14, 2018 - 10:30:33 AM

chuckv97

Canada

33756 posts since 10/5/2013

I’m 68 and still can’t quite let go of work..... feel like it’s throwing in the towel,, all washed up,, can’t cut the mustard, etc. Plus I like the job for the most part. But I’m slowed down now to a few weeks a year, just to scratch the itch.

Jun 14, 2018 - 10:36:41 AM

8631 posts since 8/22/2006

I recently retired at 62 last September and the way I figured that at 62 my SS benefits would be about 600 dollars less than if I waited until 65. Ok no guarantee of 65 right? So I figured the amount I would get between 62 and 65, it would take 80 months of the higher benefits at 65 to make up the three years of SS payment at the lower rate.

Jun 14, 2018 - 10:40:13 AM
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Lester M

Canada

83 posts since 1/12/2013

I retired at 61. By elder brother retired earlier, the same year. He gave me a big story about the strangeness of not going to work every day and the long adjustment period. After I had been retired for a few months he asked me how long it had taken me to adjust. I put down my banjo and told him, " About 3 minutes!!!" I loved my job, but I love this better.

Jun 14, 2018 - 11:18:04 AM
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Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

21218 posts since 8/3/2003

Dave retired at 56. I worked until 62. Neither of us regretted retiring.

Retirement is great. No getting up with an alarm clock every morning. No driving to work in bad weather. No having to listen to a boss tell you what to do. You can go to festivals early and join in the jamming (if you have an RV rig of some sort, that is). You can stay an extra day, let all the traffic clear out and then take your time getting back home. No job to rush home to. You have lots of time to practice your banjo (unless you have lots of honey-do projects... expect that!! if you're handy with tools).

When you hit 65 you can start your Medicare and get a secondary to take care of what medicare doesn't. We started our Social Security as soon as possible (62) and never regretted not waiting until 65 or maybe it's later now.

I highly recommend retirement as early as possible so you can enjoy your senior years.  Many people work too long and don't get to have that enjoyment.

Edited by - Texasbanjo on 06/14/2018 11:19:17

Jun 14, 2018 - 11:26:04 AM
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Wyozark

USA

466 posts since 12/2/2012

Yes, I did it. When I got out of prison I . . . . wait, my beautiful bride has asked to stop telling people I was in prison...

Anyway, I could have continued doing what I did. It was a gratifying career. Last year my former boss even asked me if I would consider coming back. But there was no going back.

At 59 1/2 I was fortunate (blessed even) to be in a position to have the option to retire with a roof over head and not worry much about food on the table. Not even close to being wealthy except in comparison to people I know who can't even consider retirement.

We were living a thousand miles away from our grandchildren, and we had to decide whether to become a part of their lives while they were still young, or else wait another five or six years to retire and then be just nearly interesting and somewhat familiar loving strangers. To retire then would mean taking at least an immediate 60% hit on our income; and a greatly reduced income for the rest of our lives. We prayed (not starting a religious topic) and then pulled the trigger.

Like you my joints are falling apart. I had hip replacement not long after retirement. And now my knees are shot. The retirement coincided with the implementation of Obamacare which by law I had to take for there were no other choices to afford. Obamacare almost did us in financially and I have a white hot hatred for it, but I'm not going into this issue or politics. I won't talk about this again.

I have no regrets about retiring. There are some things I miss, like the people; but I did my best at the time and accomplished what I wanted to do and was able to leave on my own terms which anymore seems like a luxury.

Thankfully, we have become a part of our grandchildren's lives. We have time for family and friends. Through our church I visit a lot of people and serve in whatever way I can. I have had some old widowers I have looked after (unfortunately two are now gone).

We moved from a place with friends to a place where we didn't know hardly anyone save for our kids. But we settled in and made new friends. The home we bought needs just about everything remodeled - which allows me to put my wood working and other (skills?) to work. And the twenty acres allow us to have some freedom to walk about in our pajamas if we want to...

My hope for you is that the next fifteen months don't crawl by too slowly and that you are able to enjoy each day as you can. Best wishes to you and your wife ~ Wyozark

Jun 14, 2018 - 11:35:35 AM

898 posts since 1/16/2010
Online Now

What’s your line of work Terry?

Jun 14, 2018 - 11:52:37 AM

7665 posts since 2/22/2007

I have not started drawing SS, but two years ago at age 63 I found myself taking care of two parents in their final days and running a business was simply beyond me, so I "retired" from actually trying to earn an income, turned my store into a part-time "hobby" business, and relied on my wife to support us. In a little over a year she will retire and will no doubt soon find her own part time hobby business, as we have both been near-workaholics for years and doing nothing sounds frightening to both of us. But the workaholic days are behind us both now.

Jun 14, 2018 - 12:08:57 PM

figmo59

USA

27255 posts since 3/5/2008

I ain't made it that far....yet........

I guess they say 62 1/2 ...is better....more money...
Butidunno...

This heart thing is kinda like retirement...well

I sure do git.. re-tired..alot.......
I get up n do...
Get tired...
Nap....
N get retired....

Kinda like ah cycle..... :0/

Jun 14, 2018 - 12:12:35 PM

figmo59

USA

27255 posts since 3/5/2008

quote:
Originally posted by Wyozark

Yes, I did it. When I got out of prison I . . . . wait, my beautiful bride has asked to stop telling people I was in prison...

Anyway, I could have continued doing what I did. It was a gratifying career. Last year my former boss even asked me if I would consider coming back. But there was no going back.

At 59 1/2 I was fortunate (blessed even) to be in a position to have the option to retire with a roof over head and not worry much about food on the table. Not even close to being wealthy except in comparison to people I know who can't even consider retirement.

We were living a thousand miles away from our grandchildren, and we had to decide whether to become a part of their lives while they were still young, or else wait another five or six years to retire and then be just nearly interesting and somewhat familiar loving strangers. To retire then would mean taking at least an immediate 60% hit on our income; and a greatly reduced income for the rest of our lives. We prayed (not starting a religious topic) and then pulled the trigger.

Like you my joints are falling apart. I had hip replacement not long after retirement. And now my knees are shot. The retirement coincided with the implementation of Obamacare which by law I had to take for there were no other choices to afford. Obamacare almost did us in financially and I have a white hot hatred for it, but I'm not going into this issue or politics. I won't talk about this again.

I have no regrets about retiring. There are some things I miss, like the people; but I did my best at the time and accomplished what I wanted to do and was able to leave on my own terms which anymore seems like a luxury.

Thankfully, we have become a part of our grandchildren's lives. We have time for family and friends. Through our church I visit a lot of people and serve in whatever way I can. I have had some old widowers I have looked after (unfortunately two are now gone).

We moved from a place with friends to a place where we didn't know hardly anyone save for our kids. But we settled in and made new friends. The home we bought needs just about everything remodeled - which allows me to put my wood working and other (skills?) to work. And the twenty acres allow us to have some freedom to walk about in our pajamas if we want to...

My hope for you is that the next fifteen months don't crawl by too slowly and that you are able to enjoy each day as you can. Best wishes to you and your wife ~ Wyozark


Catch..n..release program..'eh..?

You show up at the Jail House.. n they let ya go at night.. ;0)

Jun 14, 2018 - 12:15:40 PM

figmo59

USA

27255 posts since 3/5/2008

What kills me is...
All the folks that usta post alot..then retired..
N...ya neveah see'em postin nomores...


Whats that tell ya...?

Jun 14, 2018 - 1:42:14 PM
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RonR

USA

1197 posts since 11/29/2012

I'm 64 and have been roofing for 45 years. I have a good team and would like to continue for at least 5 more years. I have hobbies ,but the thought of retirement scares me.

Jun 14, 2018 - 1:44:39 PM

66669 posts since 5/9/2007

I retired in '09 after a close call with a freighter.

Jun 14, 2018 - 1:47:48 PM
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Owen

Canada

2113 posts since 6/5/2011

Fig, off the top of my head, it tells me they're either too busy, or have found more interesting time-wasters, or have gone to that big jam in the sky.  wink

Edited by - Owen on 06/14/2018 13:48:44

Jun 14, 2018 - 2:05:37 PM

bluenote23

Canada

931 posts since 12/4/2012

quote:
Originally posted by RonR

I'm 64 and have been roofing for 45 years. I have a good team and would like to continue for at least 5 more years. I have hobbies ,but the thought of retirement scares me.


I think if you really like your work then there may be no reason to stop. I ran a small business and found that interesting and fun and challenging until one day, it wasn't so much. So I looked for a buyer and by the time one was found, I was ready to stop. 

I was working all the time and so before I stopped, I was a little worried about what I would do. The morning after my last day, I woke and just started doing stuff I felt like doing. It was fantastic and has stopped being that way.

Jun 14, 2018 - 2:11:52 PM
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AndrewD

United Kingdom

1408 posts since 4/29/2012

quote:
Originally posted by figmo59

What kills me is...
All the folks that usta post alot..then retired..
N...ya neveah see'em postin nomores...


Whats that tell ya...?


That's cos a lot of us sit in front of a computer at work, at least some of the time, and posting on the BHO is more fun than what we are paid to be doing. I'm 63 and work part time from home.. Last 2 years about 70%. Told them at the start of the year that my days of getting on aeroplanes for anything not of my own choosing are over and I don't want to work more than 1/3rd of full time hours. As long as they're happy with that so am I..  Sliding into retirement slowly. 

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