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Apr 16, 2018 - 3:14:59 PM
1555 posts since 7/28/2015

Michael Jackson? U2? Metallica? Rick Astley?

Apr 16, 2018 - 3:43:06 PM

VPS

USA

125 posts since 3/29/2004

That's a little tougher. A strong case could be made for Michael Jackson. Is Madonna in there somewhere? Garth Brooks?

Apr 16, 2018 - 4:12:20 PM

rinemb Players Union Member

USA

9974 posts since 5/24/2005

Without judgement, and only based on vids at the time...m Jackson way up there. I would chapparon my kids friends to concerts. Based on that,. Sesame Street concert and pumpkin head ruled. Stones and eagles still putting on great shows. Garth Brooks perhaps. But I was focused on bg in those days. Brad

Apr 16, 2018 - 4:23:01 PM

Mooooo

USA

2936 posts since 8/20/2016

I guess a definition of Greatest Musical Act would be in order.

Apr 16, 2018 - 4:23:24 PM
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7501 posts since 2/22/2007

So much of mid-80s music is ruined by those first generation digital effects that I can't stand to listen to it.

Apr 16, 2018 - 5:14:59 PM

1555 posts since 7/28/2015

quote:
Originally posted by Mooooo

I guess a definition of Greatest Musical Act would be in order.


Yes it would.  What does it mean to you?

Apr 16, 2018 - 5:21:55 PM
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Mooooo

USA

2936 posts since 8/20/2016

quote:
Originally posted by prooftheory
quote:
Originally posted by Mooooo

I guess a definition of Greatest Musical Act would be in order.


Yes it would.  What does it mean to you?


I guess without a definition I would assume you mean The Tallest Musical Act.

Apr 16, 2018 - 5:30:37 PM
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VPS

USA

125 posts since 3/29/2004

Tallest? Adrian Vandenberg of Whitesnake?

Apr 16, 2018 - 5:41:01 PM

Mooooo

USA

2936 posts since 8/20/2016

There you go, Whitesnake may be the verifiable Greatest Musical Act of the '80s. Maybe there is another band whose average height is taller than any other.

Apr 16, 2018 - 8:06:40 PM
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47308 posts since 12/14/2005
Online Now

Too bad "They Might Be Giants" was not called "They Really ARE Giants"!   cheeky

As had been said many times:

"The best musicians are not the ones that play the most notes, but the ones which move the most hearts".

Would "greatest" be defined as most popular"?

As the one which took in the most money?

As the one which caused hundreds of other bands to want to imitate them?

Without an agreed-upon definition, there can be no meaningful discussion. ( According to my SPEECH teacher, about a half-century ago, in Hi Skule, giving us the RULES for debate.)

Apr 16, 2018 - 9:11:58 PM

Chris Meakin Players Union Member

Australia

1714 posts since 5/15/2011

Pink Floyd - The Wall

or

AC/DC - For those about to rock (we salute you).

 

Apr 16, 2018 - 9:13:44 PM
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8 posts since 4/15/2018

Oh, I dunno, REM, Talking Heads, and Dire Straits are a few that come to mind right away. Then there's bands like the Violent Femmes that may not have had a repertoire miles deep but kind of wrote the soundtrack for millions of frustrated teens everywhere anyway. I also think there's a strong case to be made that the late 80's were a second or third real heyday for the Grateful Dead. But who's to say? I mean, people like Chuck Berry, Earl Scruggs, Jimmy Cliff, Etta James, Neil Young, and Johnny Cash, just to name an almost random handful, were playing many dozens or even hundreds of gigs a year throughout the 80's, and they're all towering giants.

Apr 17, 2018 - 1:11:30 AM
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1555 posts since 7/28/2015

The "definition" of "greatest" is pretty straightforward. It is the superlative of "great" - meaning: of ability, quality, or eminence considerably above the normal or average.

The question of how you measure that is subjective. It isn't an empirical question guys.

If you want to measure total size I would have thought you would measure in terms of absolute mass rather than average mass. Wouldn't that have been something like the Boston Symphony Orchestra?

Apr 17, 2018 - 4:54:16 AM

mbuk06 Players Union Member

England

6235 posts since 10/5/2006

As an 80's art student I vividly remember these guys performing:

Ever since I've always thought a banjo equivalent would be a great way to take over entire towns...

Edited by - mbuk06 on 04/17/2018 04:58:53

Apr 17, 2018 - 5:27:09 AM
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948 posts since 2/16/2017

I also think the genre should be defined, but even so I don’t think any act was bigger than MJ. 

 

He was huge, was famous throughout the entire decade, and like ABBA, he was global.  He was a SUPERSTAR.

 

The pics below are all from his 1988 world tour

Rome

Ireland

Liverpool.

He was HUGE.

Apr 17, 2018 - 5:32:56 AM
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KE

Malta

22011 posts since 6/30/2006

Prince.

You can close the thread now.

Apr 17, 2018 - 6:00:06 AM
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Banjo Lefty

Canada

1143 posts since 6/19/2014

You didn’t specify genre, so I’m going to say Herbert von Karajan and the Berliner Philharmonic. Their 1984 Beethoven cycle (the last of four) was perhaps the most popular classical recording ever; it is estimated (see Wikipedia) that he sold over 200 million records in his day. Michael Jackson doesn’t even come close.

Apr 17, 2018 - 6:14:58 AM

450 posts since 10/16/2014

MJ was probably the biggest, but he released only two albums the entire decade, and one of them was mediocre in my opinion. My favorite band of all time is a group of former UGA art students whose 1983 debut album was picked by Rolling Stone as the best of the year, over Thriller. Here's their two songs with banjo:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y1qHqf_fKRY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vcHORmlabYU

Apr 17, 2018 - 6:27 AM
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402 posts since 12/2/2013

I think the operative word here is "act," not group, suggesting a stage performance rather than an album(s). Going only on hearsay, since I couldn't stand either one of these two, Michael Jackson and/or Prince in concert based on crowd size and "flash."

Edited by - flyingsquirrelinlay on 04/17/2018 06:27:54

Apr 17, 2018 - 7:00:01 AM
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1555 posts since 7/28/2015

quote:
Originally posted by Banjo Lefty

You didn’t specify genre, so I’m going to say Herbert von Karajan and the Berliner Philharmonic. Their 1984 Beethoven cycle (the last of four) was perhaps the most popular classical recording ever; it is estimated (see Wikipedia) that he sold over 200 million records in his day. Michael Jackson doesn’t even come close.


This is a legit candidate but I guess it depends on what we are taking 1980s Musical Act to mean.  I really think of Karajan as a 1960s guy and the 200 million number is probably for the span from the 1940s until his death.  (The reference doesn't actually say.)  

Anyone arguing for Billy Joel?

Apr 17, 2018 - 7:04:37 AM

1555 posts since 7/28/2015

I think a strong case could be made for Run DMC. If there were no Michael Jackson, popular music would probably not have been very much effected. Without Run DMC the bulk of contemporary music would sound drastically different.

Apr 17, 2018 - 7:15:34 AM

mbuk06 Players Union Member

England

6235 posts since 10/5/2006

As Hawkerfiddle said: weird. Apart from an opportunity to watch a bunch of old guys bicker in public I'm dubious what the point is with this thread and it's twin 1970's thread?

The accountants have the answer.

And having to use that sentence is never inspiring.winkdevil

Edited by - mbuk06 on 04/17/2018 07:27:03

Apr 17, 2018 - 7:19:06 AM
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1555 posts since 7/28/2015

quote:
Originally posted by mbuk06

Apart from an opportunity to watch old guys bicker I'm dubious what the point is with this thread and it's twin 1970's thread?

The accountants have the answer.

And having to use that sentence is never inspiring...

...I guess an occasional good bicker is ok.


Bickering was entirely the point. Also, if you want to be a great musician, it helps to think a little about what you think that means.

Apr 17, 2018 - 7:29:40 AM
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mbuk06 Players Union Member

England

6235 posts since 10/5/2006

- glances reassuringly at banjo - I don't think I see any personal relevance whatsoever in those mentioned so far. As far as I'm concerned (then and now) they were and are completely alien; an industrial mass-product far removed from intimate artistic expression. To compare or assess personal creativity (or even intent) against such a bizarre measure is a very odd and distorted idea to offer as a guide. Truly. The idea that a vast stadium filled Nuremburg-style with passive adulating onlookers who've been persuade to pay top dollar to be treated impersonally like a human-sardine is a measure of anything that interests me musically is a bit ...well, peculiar. Each to his own.

 

Now, if you're talking about listening to Glen Smith or Wade Ward or any of those guys on their porch or in their parlor we may both be on planet earth and you have yourself a point. wink

Edited by - mbuk06 on 04/17/2018 07:50:24

Apr 17, 2018 - 7:40:30 AM

1555 posts since 7/28/2015

No one arguing for Ricky Skaggs or New Grass Revival or even Garth Brooks?

Apr 17, 2018 - 8:00:30 AM
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KE

Malta

22011 posts since 6/30/2006

quote:
Originally posted by mbuk06

- glances reassuringly at banjo - I don't think I see any personal relevance whatsoever in those mentioned so far. As far as I'm concerned (then and now) they were and are completely alien; an industrial mass-product far removed from intimate artistic expression. To compare or assess personal creativity (or even intent) against such a bizarre measure is a very odd and distorted idea to offer as a guide. Truly. The idea that a vast stadium filled Nuremburg-style with passive adulating onlookers who've been persuade to pay top dollar to be treated impersonally like a human-sardine is a measure of anything that interests me musically is a bit ...well, peculiar. Each to his own.

 

Now, if you're talking about listening to Glen Smith or Wade Ward or any of those guys on their porch or in their parlor we may both be on planet earth and you have yourself a point. wink


Prince? Michael Jackson? Far removed from intimate artistic expression? Industrial mass-product? The fact that some of these "alien" (to you maybe) artists become popular and draw stadium-filling crowds doesn't really negate "intimate artistic expression" does it?

But let's keep hugging our banjo, reassured that we are resisting the urge to become popular. wink

Edited by - KE on 04/17/2018 08:07:49

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