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Feb 14, 2018 - 10:00:32 AM

Owen

Canada

1760 posts since 6/5/2011

Some food for thought...a link to a 2015 MotherJones article about what is/isn't effective discipline:   https://www.motherjones.com/politics/2015/07/schools-behavior-discipline-collaborative-proactive-solutions-ross-greene/

[I see the word "politics" in the link, so I guess I'm out on a limb...]      wink

Feb 14, 2018 - 11:39:21 AM

1366 posts since 7/28/2015
Online Now

I have noticed in my children's classes that they often punish the ADHD kids by taking away recess time. What a great idea, take away the one thing that makes these kids calm down and be able to learn as a way to punish them for their inability to calm down and be able to learn.

The beatings will continue...

Feb 14, 2018 - 11:57:24 AM

7364 posts since 2/22/2007

----"Under Greene’s philosophy, you’d no more punish a child for yelling out in class or jumping out of his seat repeatedly than you would if he bombed a spelling test. You’d talk with the kid to figure out the reasons for the outburst (was he worried he would forget what he wanted to say?), then brainstorm alternative strategies for the next time he felt that way. The goal is to get to the root of the problem, not to discipline a kid for the way his brain is wired.-----"

One teacher, twenty five kids, one will not stop acting out, what to do? The article seems to suggest that this teacher will have unlimited time----not to mention a host of specialized behavioral skills----- to devote to this one problem child. What about the other 24? Sometimes it's like triage and one must do the best that they can in the real world in which they work, not some idealized situation.

Feb 14, 2018 - 12:27:01 PM

Owen

Canada

1760 posts since 6/5/2011

Bill, as a former teacher I kinda wonder about that aspect too, but maybe it needs a change in basic outlook, rather than trying to fit it into an existing model  The article gives a few examples of school(s) and juvenile detention centers [real world?] where it's apparently working.  I wouldn't expect an immediate transformation.  More educational assistants would be required, but that could be an investment that pays off in spades.  In the long run a teacher could conceivably spend less time over-all on "discipline" and other results also improve. Since current methods too often aren't producing the desired results, I'm certainly willing to give it some time.

Frank, I witnessed the exact scenario you describe, with a classmate of mine,  when I was a student, and his frequently included noon hours, minus a 5-minute-or-so toilet break, of course!!!  ... That might have been before ADHD even had a name, so it's been  with us for a while.   Without actual knowledge of such things, and having serious things to do... like get out and play ball, I nevertheless remember thinking, with my child's reasoning how "unfair" it was.

Edited by - Owen on 02/14/2018 12:40:45

Feb 14, 2018 - 12:49:51 PM
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Mooooo

USA

2039 posts since 8/20/2016
Online Now

When I was a kid, my parents gave permission to the teachers to give me a good spanking if I acted up. Those were the good old days.angry

Feb 14, 2018 - 1:12:06 PM

donc

Canada

5265 posts since 2/9/2010
Online Now

The old world thinking was that children were simply little adults. Children who were entirely focused were rewarded with ornate stickers and public commendation. Essentially they were rewarded for providing the teacher with a soft job. Children who had other ideas and interests were singled out, punished, and humiliated for having thoughts of their own. Bullying was often ignored because kids typically harassed the kids who didn't make the grade. Teachers were often the kids who succeeded in the classroom and were often the athletic icons. How could these people naturally identify with outsiders ? In the 1960's many teachers only had a 10 month long certificate course. I still don't like to reminisce about my early school days.Too many women were there because they were deprived of the opportunities to enter male dominated professions. Their frustration with the limited choice of being a nurse, typist, or school teacher was obvious. We did have some good men and woman teachers but others were there because they were probably searching for a slack job with a steady pay check . As any teacher will agree there is nothing easy about that job.

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