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Oct 12, 2017 - 9:20:20 AM

hoodoo

Canada

77 posts
Joined Oct 6, 2017

Hi,

I'm beginning to encounter this problem more frequently. What does the "P" mean. In other contexts it means pull off, but how do I pull off on an open string? (See attached photo for example of what I mean)

Oct 12, 2017 - 9:21:08 AM

hoodoo

Canada

77 posts
Joined Oct 6, 2017

It might help if I actually upload it.


 

Oct 12, 2017 - 9:44:02 AM
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Northl

USA

41 posts
Joined Apr 30, 2017

youtu.be/hzmbUg_z4Tg
This series of 3 videos by Fretless Fury show how it is done.

Oct 12, 2017 - 9:54:48 AM

janolov Players Union Member

Sweden

38396 posts
Joined Mar 7, 2006

I prefer to think the "P" as a left hand pluck rather tahn a pull off. I get a better sound if I pluck the string with the left hand (with a movement paralllel to the fretboard) instead of pulling off up from the fretboard.

You can try to find some videos of Doc Watson playing banjo. He never drop thumbed but used a lot of hammers and pull-offs, and his "pull offs" on open strings were typical "plucks" not pull-off.

If you want to do it as a pull-off (up from the fretboard) - and a lot of players do it this way - you just fret the string (withouth striking it) on the "bum" beat, at then pull off the un-stroked and fretted string at the "pa" (if you think of the typical clawhammer stroke as "bum-pa-di-ty".

Edited by - janolov on 10/12/2017 09:59:41

Oct 12, 2017 - 10:30:48 AM

AndrewD

United Kingdom

1018 posts
Joined Apr 29, 2012

Do a search on ASPO (Alternative string pull off )

Edited by - AndrewD on 10/12/2017 10:31:09

Oct 12, 2017 - 2:14:51 PM

hoodoo

Canada

77 posts
Joined Oct 6, 2017

Is the kind of thing that I can live without knowing or is crucial to my development?

Oct 12, 2017 - 2:39:22 PM

AndrewD

United Kingdom

1018 posts
Joined Apr 29, 2012

If you can do pull-offs then pulling off another string isn't hard - in fact possibly easier. Try it on just an open G chord for now. with a bum on the 4th string followed by plucking the 1st and then a ditty. See ? Easy !

Oct 12, 2017 - 2:42:15 PM
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Paul R

Canada

9670 posts
Joined Jan 28, 2010

quote:
Originally posted by hoodoo

Is the kind of thing that I can live without knowing or is crucial to my development?


Maybe not crucial, but certainly useful. It will come.

Oct 12, 2017 - 11:30:08 PM

John Gribble Players Union Member

Japan

4279 posts
Joined May 14, 2007

To do the passage shown, put your middle finder on the third string, second fret and your ring finger on the second string, second fret. Play the third string, then pull off (or pluck) the second string with the ring finger. You'll need to practice a little to get the timing right and not have the plucked string be too loud or too quiet. It is no big deal and a useful technique.

Oct 13, 2017 - 9:12:29 AM

Jim Yates

Canada

6258 posts
Joined Feb 21, 2007

quote:
Originally posted by janolov

I prefer to think the "P" as a left hand pluck rather tahn a pull off. I get a better sound if I pluck the string with the left hand (with a movement paralllel to the fretboard) instead of pulling off up from the fretboard.

You can try to find some videos of Doc Watson playing banjo. He never drop thumbed but used a lot of hammers and pull-offs, and his "pull offs" on open strings were typical "plucks" not pull-off.

If you want to do it as a pull-off (up from the fretboard) - and a lot of players do it this way - you just fret the string (withouth striking it) on the "bum" beat, at then pull off the un-stroked and fretted string at the "pa" (if you think of the typical clawhammer stroke as "bum-pa-di-ty".


I have never heard anyone differentiate between "left hand pluck" and "pull off".  I call them all pull offs, the word coined by Pete Seeger, (the folk musician's term for "left hand pizzicatto") even when I do a push off on the 4th string.  Simply lifting your finger off the string produces no sound.  You must pluck the string to make a sound.

Oct 13, 2017 - 9:17:24 AM
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Jim Yates

Canada

6258 posts
Joined Feb 21, 2007

Hoodoo, I'm curious. Why did you label your question about tabs "stupid"? If you don't know how to interpret something and you ask for help, that's not being stupid, it's being smart.

Oct 13, 2017 - 2:01:59 PM

9768 posts
Joined Feb 12, 2011

I think of it as a push off. I push towards me and a bit upward to get a bit of a pluck.

Oct 13, 2017 - 2:09:40 PM
like this

17399 posts
Joined Jul 21, 2005

I used to give my students this exercise in 4 beats:

1 1st beat: an open string pull-off on the 1st string.
2 2nd beat: a thumb on 3rd or 4th string.
3 3rd beat: an open string pull-off on the 2nd string.
4 4th beat: a thumb strike on the 5th string.

I usually used my left hand middle finger for the pull-offs and would "fret" roughly 3 to 4 semitones above the Open string.

My policy in teaching this would be the same as my general policy of using "air strikes" with the normal frailing finger passing harmlessly (or at least soundlessly) above the strings - thus with a steady beat.

Oct 13, 2017 - 2:12:28 PM

17399 posts
Joined Jul 21, 2005

That last sentence should have read: "Thus Keeping a Steady Beat."

Tony

Oct 16, 2017 - 2:51:25 AM

hoodoo

Canada

77 posts
Joined Oct 6, 2017

Thanks. I've been having a hard time with this one. I don't learn very well by watching videos.

Nov 17, 2017 - 5:48:10 AM
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hoodoo

Canada

77 posts
Joined Oct 6, 2017

Update : Although, I'm not great at it, I no longer cringe in fear when I encounter an ASPO. I'm getting much better at it!

I found this link to be much more helpful than the videos on YouTube : https://clawhammerbanjo.net/the-round-peak-recipe/

Edited by - hoodoo on 11/17/2017 05:50:54

Nov 17, 2017 - 1:33:04 PM

778 posts
Joined Jan 26, 2012

You have to plan ahead for the pull off. Once you're at the beat, it's too late. I plant my finger on the string on the beat before, so it's ready to go. The hard thing for me is planting the finger gently enough that it doesn't sound like a hammer-on. I do pull-offs with whichever finger is best for that particular pull-off, meaning whichever finger is available at the moment, and on a fret that will sound decent since there is always a bit of sound when planting it.

Nov 17, 2017 - 3:59:47 PM
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17399 posts
Joined Jul 21, 2005

ClayTech has it exactly right:
he pull-off is a sharp snap of the fretting finger toward the palm, sounding the open string below the pull off.

Some people use a push off instead but that strikes me as harder to control - how far will a given string push away from the palm before it snaps back seems like it would be more entangled with the string gauge and type - but the people that do it that way don't seem to have any trouble with it so...

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