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Oct 12, 2017 - 7:17:04 AM

rinemb Players Union Member

USA

9481 posts
Joined May 24, 2005

From prior topics, I have discovered we have many folks familiar with wood fences. I have built a couple but, figure I can do better.
I plan to build about 275 feet of fence, navigating the perimeter of my back yard. NO PAINTED FENCE THIS TIME! We are going for a nice look and quality.

The Fence: Style-basically a "cap rail" fence. 6 feet high, all cedar (though costs are zooming on quality western red cedar), 6x6 posts on corners and at gates, and likely 4x6 posts everywhere else. two walk through gates, and one equipment through gate. 2x6 cap rail with posts going up higher than cap rail (so no joints in cap as they but into posts), 2x4 rails (up to 3 rails on inside, and 1-2 on outside), 1x6 pickets. Likely copper or wood post caps.

I am concerned about best way and positions of the fasteners, for structural integrity and avoiding water capture.

As previously discussed, due to ground conditions, will use concrete to set posts on gravel base.

Some details to ponder....nails or coated screws on pickets and rails. quickcrete (which may save having to support posts while concrete sets, or standard concrete. coating or wrapping bottoms of posts. treating or not treating fence with various preservatives. etc.

My first cost analysis (using quality grades lumber), has climbed to 13000.00 or 47.00 per running foot of fence. (lumber, cement, fasteners, hardware, post caps) Ouch! no labor included.

I look forward to any and all recommendations and suggestions.

Edited by - rinemb on 10/12/2017 07:18:13

Oct 12, 2017 - 8:08:07 AM
like this

12737 posts
Joined Aug 14, 2003

See if you can't find a local sawyer in your area that can cut exactly what you want.. Bandsawn cedar is plenty good as it comes off the mill... Save yourself a bunch of money..

Oct 12, 2017 - 8:44:30 AM

rinemb Players Union Member

USA

9481 posts
Joined May 24, 2005

quote:
Originally posted by Kenneth Logsdon

See if you can't find a local sawyer in your area that can cut exactly what you want.. Bandsawn cedar is plenty good as it comes off the mill... Save yourself a bunch of money..


Interesting idea.  I have not considered that for fencing lumber.  We do have a a couple around here with resaw equipment etc. Brad

Oct 12, 2017 - 9:13:57 AM

mander

USA

1729 posts
Joined Oct 7, 2007

I've never met a fence I liked. This being dog central, I assume the reason is pets? If not, may I put in my plug for a hedge instead? I actually prefer cyclone over wood. The trouble with wood of course, is moss. I actually love moss. It's one of my favorite things. However, every time a fence starts to grow moss and starts to look interesting... people take the fence down and put up something new. You can see through cyclone if you want to, or, you can grow grapes, hops, kiwi, etc if you prefer those. If you're set on wood, then by all means, copper on the posts caps.

Oct 12, 2017 - 9:25:21 AM

Brian T

Canada

13217 posts
Joined Jun 5, 2008

All sorts of back yard fencing here, no village standards at all.

Neighbor to the south put up a very strong solid cedar fence on 6" posts.
Makes his yard seem like a prison yard.
The cedar has weathered to a really nice silver color over the years.
As has become obvious, the wasps just love the weathered wood for nest building,
so the entire fence has what look to be scratches all over it.

Neighbor on the other side has done nothing. They are willing to complain about the deer that browse their apple trees ( like 7:30AM this morning!)
Doggie and deer reasons to fence my yard. 4x4 treated posts in tamped sand every 8'. treated 2x4 rails. 2" stucco mesh is just about transparent. Did 80' down the side and the grape vines are producing nicely. Privacy in the summers, no wind loading in the winter storms.

Oct 12, 2017 - 11:15:34 AM
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RonR

USA

1071 posts
Joined Nov 29, 2012

One week at an inclusive in Barbados, dump the rest in mutual funds, wait two years and see if you still want a fence

Oct 12, 2017 - 11:49:42 AM

rinemb Players Union Member

USA

9481 posts
Joined May 24, 2005

quote:
Originally posted by RonR

One week at an inclusive in Barbados, dump the rest in mutual funds, wait two years and see if you still want a fence


Well, I tore down half of the fence 5 years ago and built the new retaining wall on the down hill side of the property.  Talked to a fence builder 4 years ago.  Bought my farm jack 3 years ago to pull remaining posts, tore out those remaining posts this year.  Wife thinks my procrastination time is up.  Besides, with the cut off my lot, I have 5 backyard neighbors...and you ought to see the yards of four of them.  Then it may add a tad more protection from the bad guys that have wondered around back there stealing my stuff and trying to break in back door.  Other than that, Ron, I like your plan. ;-). 

Oct 13, 2017 - 7:36:04 AM

4492 posts
Joined Sep 16, 2004

Unless they're bolts, nail and screw fasteners are doomed to failure.

Personally, I like to capture rather than mechanically fix outside assemblies. As for water protection, I prefer sloped and naturally shedding designs.

Your soil, topography, weather and aesthetic values (Mander's hedge rows is nce, except for decades needed to establish) will determine your method of assembly. However, one element remains constant and that's expansion and contraction. Perhaps consider, captured eight foot sections floating between posts fixed above with a cap and below grade in gravel. It's the same method as a panel door. The advantage is the repetition of panels. You can make an assembly line. Another advantage of the expansion panel method is tolerances are become less critical. The design of post stops is arbitrarily determined. This is where Ken's suggestion of custom milling could come in nicely.

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