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I Ordered The Osborne Chief (Part 8)

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Jun 23, 2019 - 11:39:54 AM
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Players Union Member

rbfour5

USA

963 posts since 11/9/2010

@beardog.  That is a great story, and a memorable one at that! And I’ll bet you still own that maple Cheif banjo!

Jun 24, 2019 - 3:20:37 AM

17 posts since 5/14/2003

Sonny,

I am wondering if you know where each and everyone of the Chief banjo's are living? I know there are so many out there and it may be hard to keep track, but I am thinking that those who do acquire one eventually get around to telling you about it. I would love to know where #33 ended up.

Jun 24, 2019 - 1:19:32 PM
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2978 posts since 3/6/2005

Jeff...I can tell you where each one went when it left here originally. They became like children to me. I set every one up and made sure everything was right. Delivered some, packed and shipped the rest. George Gruhn sold a few so I didn't do everything on those.

I can tell you where #33 went originally and to whom it was sold...and the date it left me.

11-16-2000...Number 33 went to Jeff Tuttle....wait a minute here...that's you ain't it Jeff...why sure. 

A little trivia...Rocky Top, perhaps the top selling Bluegrass song of all time, was recorded at Bradley's Barn Studio on that date in 1967. 'twas the first recording of that song. Recorded by The Osborne Brothers and since has been recorded over 100 times by different artists.

s

Jun 24, 2019 - 1:27:37 PM
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2978 posts since 3/6/2005

Incidentally Sam....you bought number 42 and it was built on Oct. 4, 2009. 

s

Jun 24, 2019 - 2:45:04 PM

17 posts since 5/14/2003

I sold #33 to Rod Carter around 2007 or 2008. I'm not sure that he has it any longer. I like my Rocky Top model, but if the circumstances were right, I'd like to have #33 back. A great banjo...

Jun 24, 2019 - 4:47:28 PM

chuckv97

Canada

42058 posts since 10/5/2013

I posted this here a while back. Very nice banjo... I’ve got to get over to Tim’s again soon to play it.  If memory serves me right ,he bought it from BHO member Michael Corcoran in Saskatoon.
“btw, I was lucky enough last week to play Chief #8, owned now by Tim Vickers of Calgary. What a great sounding and easy-to-play banjo!”

Edited by - chuckv97 on 06/24/2019 16:50:23

Jun 26, 2019 - 8:51:05 PM

2978 posts since 3/6/2005

They're good and aging well.

s

Jun 27, 2019 - 1:14:06 PM

462 posts since 3/30/2008

I have #77. Walnut Chief "born' 9/2015. Sounds great. Looks great. Wouldn't trade it for about nothing.

Craig

Jun 30, 2019 - 6:39:10 PM

157 posts since 3/6/2006

Chief,

This is a little off-topic, but I'm reading a book by the name of "Trapped! The Story of Floyd Collins". Floyd was trapped in a cave near Mammoth Cave in 1925. He died there. It's a heartbreaking story. Since this is near your "neck of the woods", I was curious if you had any caving stories to tell?

Tim L.
Chief #5

Jul 1, 2019 - 5:54:53 AM

257 posts since 4/2/2009

I have a 2006 walnut engraved chief and a 2005 maple chief that are amazing banjos. Unfortunately, due to the weights and a bad back I'm now playing hoop banjos more than anything. Any interest if I offer them up?

Jul 1, 2019 - 8:19:45 AM

257 posts since 4/2/2009

Just listed my Walnut Chief in the classifieds

Jul 1, 2019 - 9:47:29 AM

5166 posts since 10/13/2007

quote:
Originally posted by bulldog bob

Just listed my Walnut Chief in the classifieds


It is a beauty and from wood from Bean Blossom! And a good price too. That will gone soon. Sorry for your back problems. It has to hurt to let that one go.

ken

Jul 1, 2019 - 9:56:54 AM

257 posts since 4/2/2009

Thanks. I have a 2005 maple one too.

Jul 1, 2019 - 1:23:47 PM
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2978 posts since 3/6/2005

Nope, I don't do caves. Too confining. Not a phobia, I just don't like the idea of being back under something that COULD fall.                        There was another happening too. Jimmy Osborne had a song about it...Little Kathy Fiscus. I shiver at the thought.

NOPE, not for me.

s

Jul 1, 2019 - 4:57:46 PM

WesB

USA

164 posts since 12/17/2014

Boy, "Kathy Fiscus" brings up really old memories. Wasn't she the tyke that fell into the well in SoCal many years ago?

Edited by - WesB on 07/01/2019 16:58:31

Jul 1, 2019 - 6:31:20 PM

5 posts since 3/22/2019

Sonny,

You and Bobby recorded a CD “Some Things I Want To Song About”. One of the songs I especially liked was Rosie Bokay, but there is one entitled “So Doggone Lonesome”. On it it sounds like you’re playing a 6 string banjo.

Can you tell us about the 6 string banjo, how it’s tuned, etc. How hard was the addition of a 6th string to incorporate into your roll. I don’t know that I ever saw you play a 6 string. Did/do you offer 6 string in a Chief banjo?

Take care and many thanks!

Jul 6, 2019 - 10:11:01 AM

1252 posts since 4/13/2009

"And our next number is called Rawhide!"


 

Jul 9, 2019 - 5:23:10 AM
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5166 posts since 10/13/2007

Sonny,
Recently I have been looking at a book entitled "Peak" by Anders Ericsson and Robert Pool. It talks about the practice required for peak performances and has studied athletes, musicians and memory champions at the highest level. They say that "deliberate practice" is essential for this level of success . In defining this type of practice they say ( among other things) that: 1. you must have feedback and understand your weaknesses, 2. That you have to constantly challenge yourself.
As I understand your story, when a youth, you practiced all you could from sun up to sun down and from what I have seen, no one has become a better player than you. Sooo my questions to you are: 1. Did you get feedback, were you able to focus on weaknesses. 2 Were you able to/ how did you, constantly challenge yourself? 3. What do you think of their ideas? 4. Most importantly:  What do you think are the keys to the most productive practice?

If this is not of interest to you, please pass it by. Thanks for your time in reading this and for your accessibility to us.

Ken

Jul 9, 2019 - 5:33:48 AM

5 posts since 3/22/2019

quote:
Originally posted by From Greylock to Bean Blossom

Sonny,
Recently I have been looking at a book entitled "Peak" by Anders Ericsson and Robert Pool. It talks about the practice required for peak performances and has studied athletes, musicians and memory champions at the highest level. They say that "deliberate practice" is essential for this level of success . In defining this type of practice they say ( among other things) that: 1. you must have feedback and understand your weaknesses, 2. That you have to constantly challenge yourself.
As I understand your story, when a youth, you practiced all you could from sun up to sun down and from what I have seen, no one has become a better player than you. Sooo my questions to you are: 1. Did you get feedback, were you able to focus on weaknesses. 2 Were you able to/ how did you, constantly challenge yourself? 3. What do you think of their ideas? 4. Most importantly:  What do you think are the keys to the most productive practice?

If this is not of interest to you, please pass it by. Thanks for your time in reading this and for your accessibility to us.

Ken


Good question - I would add, and perhaps Sonny can comment, some of the best banjo licks I’ve made were spontaneous and completely unrehearsed.  I think (maybe unique to bluegrass music) the spontaneous licks/energy brought to the stage is great.  I think Sonny was one of the best in this regard.  IMHO - makes for some terrific/entertaining music.

Edited by - leeave96 on 07/09/2019 05:34:41

Jul 9, 2019 - 8:47:42 AM

2705 posts since 11/19/2003

I've just listed this 2003 maple Chief in the classifieds. . . I took it in as a trade and it's a great banjo (of course). . . it also has some of the prettiest maple I've ever seen in one of these.  I have not had the tone ring out of it, but it should be a Blaylock. . . interestingly, the ring appears to be copper-flashed instead of gold plated. Any insight on this?

banjohangout.org/classified/76217

thanks,

Greg Earnest

Edited by - Greg Earnest on 07/09/2019 08:49:01

Jul 10, 2019 - 5:10:59 PM

25 posts since 5/19/2006

Greetings Chief owners!
I realize this question has probably been answered several times. But I’d appreciate a breakdown of how to interpret the serial numbers on these banjos. Particularly the maple models of the Chief. I remember it used to be on Sonny Osborne’s website but the site doesn’t seem to be operating any longer.

Thanks in advance for the help!
Dale

Jul 13, 2019 - 8:51:29 PM

2978 posts since 3/6/2005

Dale,

Year, month. and number of that particular banjo.

12-2019-75   it was made in December (12) Two thousand nineteen (2019) it was number seventy five. (75)

And, they were not in any kind of sequence...other than the month and year.

s

Jul 13, 2019 - 8:59:42 PM

2978 posts since 3/6/2005

Hey Greg,

The tone ring is not gold plated...you are correct. If the number of that banjo is after 66, it's definitely Blaylock.

Good to hear from you Greg. Are you still working with John? Sent an email to him a couple months ago. Figured the address was wrong, or he just didn't want to respond...HA!

s

Jul 13, 2019 - 9:26:40 PM
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2978 posts since 3/6/2005

Ken.

1. Did you get feedback, were you able to focus on weaknesses. 2 Were you able to/ how did you, constantly challenge yourself? 3. What do you think of their ideas? 4. Most importantly:  What do you think are the keys to the most productive practice?

1. I did not get feedback, I knew my weaknesses and struggled mightely to defeat them...eventually I succeeded, for the most part.

2. The challenge was simple. Determination. The need to beat the odds and defeat the master...coming in a distant 2nd, although I told myself I won!!!!!

3. I was all in for Scruggs until Randy Lynn Rag came out and they left a clear mistake on Earl's part. I figured if he went down, I went down because I didn't know anything else. I started listening to every other kind of music played on every conceivable instrument. That opened my mind and from that point their ideas, I should say, No one's ideas meant anything.  I loved my musical ideas and thought process...still do for the most part. 

4. Practice. Learning, I practiced up to 14 hours per day. Determined to play the banjo. The very best way to practice is complete focus, and concentration. No phone, NO distraction, No TV or radio. In a room with the door closed. Learn what your weak points are and do just those until you beat them, then move on to the next one.  

I will add this...by learning Earl's right hand...and I did it, I was able to play anything. If I could hear it, I could play it because of the right hand...and knowing the neck of the banjo. 

Ken, I hope this is clear...a small wonder if it is...

s

Jul 13, 2019 - 9:30 PM
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2978 posts since 3/6/2005

Hey Wes and leeave I haven't ignored you. I'll tell you all about the 6 string banjo, next time. Old 82 year old guys get tired real easy.

Hang in there.

s

Edited by - TheChief on 07/13/2019 21:32:26

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