Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

476
Banjo Lovers Online


 All Forums
 Playing the Banjo
 Playing Advice: 4-String (Jazz, Blues & Other Trad Styles)
 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Best complementing instrument for Irish banjo?


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/97786

Page: 1  2  

pweller - Posted - 10/30/2007:  12:22:00


In y'all's opinions, what instrument best complements a banjo in a Celtic setting? I'd have to go with accordion. I've jammed with an accordion player many times. I was never a big fan of flute accompaniment, but I know there's a lot who do it. I just think the banjo's twang stands apart from the accordion but meshes very well at the same time. Do any other instruments sound good with the banjo?

wayne biggers - Posted - 10/30/2007:  12:33:57


Violin and Flute

Never Give Up--Never Surrender

DanielT - Posted - 10/30/2007:  12:35:46


Box

JohnGP - Posted - 10/30/2007:  12:43:50


Only one possible answer:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AOD3NTSHvMA

John
Actually - it does get better if you pick it.

banjonz - Posted - 10/30/2007:  14:02:32


A pint of Guiness!!

Wayne
New Zealand

The lightning flashed, the thunder roared and all the trees were shaken;
The little pig curled up his tail, and ran to save his bacon.

Cotton-eyed Joe - Posted - 10/30/2007:  14:26:49


fiddle

Banjowen - Posted - 10/30/2007:  15:38:57


Melodeon closely followed by fiddle...

Owen.


http://www.fiddlehangout.com
www.transatlanticbluegrass.com.
www.banjohollow.ic24.net

ruraltradpunk - Posted - 10/30/2007:  17:15:36


button accordion or the pipes - coupla great tunes featuring banjo & pipes (and banjo & accordion) on "Memories From the Holla", the CD Angelina Carberry did with her dad and the guitarist John Blake. I think it's her da's uncle who plays the pipes on the recording, can't remember for sure though but know it's a family member.

Jill

pweller - Posted - 10/30/2007:  20:02:12


I've never heard banjo and pipes, but that sounds like it'd be a lot of fun. Banjo and fiddle seems to be more of an Appalachian pairing. I still side with box. I once jammed with a piccolo player. She claimed it would sound like a tin whistle, but it didn't.

pweller - Posted - 10/30/2007:  20:03:38


Oh, one more thing: But if it came down between a box player and jamming with Dubliners' John Sheahan....I'd side with Sheahan's fiddle!

mikeyes - Posted - 10/30/2007:  22:47:56


I have heard a number of very well know banjo players say that they don't like playing just with a flute. The reason given is that the flute phrases so differently from the banjo while pipes and accordion have a lot in common with the banjo. The banjo does not compete with them (different timbre) but it seems to enhance.

I have heard very nice banjo and harp but a lot of that depends on the players.

Mike Keyes
http://www.banjosessions.com
http://www.mikekeyes.com

DanielT - Posted - 10/31/2007:  14:06:59


Come to think of it, I can think of a couple real nice banjo / pipes pairings. One is on Seamus Egan's album In Your Ear. I particularly like the track that begins with "Piper's Despair." (Don't know who's on pipes on this one, sorry!)

Also, on the album Mick Moloney with Eugene O'Donnell, Mick and Joe McKenna did an amazing (and fast) version of "Sean Reid's/Toss the Feathers."

Anyone got any others?


Edited by - DanielT on 10/31/2007 14:08:34

pweller - Posted - 10/31/2007:  15:43:02


The Fureys had a piper didn't they? At least when they played with their father they did. Did they ever do a pipes/banjo pairing with Davey Arthur?

JohnGP - Posted - 10/31/2007:  16:06:05


quote:
Originally posted by pweller

The Fureys had a piper didn't they? At least when they played with their father they did. Did they ever do a pipes/banjo pairing with Davey Arthur?




Finbar Furey (now following a solo career as they say) was known as the "Prince of Pipers" and still is. I dont recall him playing with their father, the brothers Finbar and Eddie, Finbar playng uillian papes and tin whistle with Eddie on 12 string guitar is as far back as I go

John
Actually - it does get better if you pick it.

pweller - Posted - 10/31/2007:  18:51:47


Here's a clip of the Fureys with (allegedly) their old man:

http://youtube.com/watch?v=lFVmUU0B9dA

banjovy - Posted - 10/31/2007:  23:40:45


a great sounding guitar

mainejohn - Posted - 11/01/2007:  17:20:04


I'm no expert, but IMHO, if it doesn't feature a bodhran, it ain't Celtic. Nothin' like Celtic tenor banjo, a bodhran, and a pint of Guiness!

Cheers,
John
Scarborough, Maine

pweller - Posted - 11/01/2007:  18:04:10


I find that a well-played bodhran complements a banjo quite nicely. A badly-played bodhran is disastrous, more so than a badly-played fiddle or box.

DanielT - Posted - 11/02/2007:  00:23:46


quote:
Originally posted by mainejohn

I'm no expert, but IMHO, if it doesn't feature a bodhran, it ain't Celtic. Nothin' like Celtic tenor banjo, a bodhran, and a pint of Guiness!


Yea, a bodhran can be nice, but what's "Celtic" tenor banjo? Is it anything like North American five string banjo?

Mainechowder - Posted - 11/02/2007:  06:02:04


quote:
Originally posted by mainejohn

I'm no expert, but IMHO, if it doesn't feature a bodhran, it ain't Celtic. Nothin' like Celtic tenor banjo, a bodhran, and a pint of Guiness!

Cheers,
John
Scarborough, Maine




John,

I was getting ready to post the exact same answer, then I got down and read your response!!!!

Great "Maine" minds think alike.

Don


mainejohn - Posted - 11/02/2007:  07:13:18


quote:
[i]Originally posted by DanielT[

Yea, a bodhran can be nice, but what's "Celtic" tenor banjo? Is it anything like North American five string banjo?





That must mean there's more than one "Celtic tenor banjo" style and, once again, I don't know what the hell I'm talkng about!

Cheers,
John
Scarborough, M

diarmaid - Posted - 11/02/2007:  15:49:19


fiddle or button accordian are the best complementing instruments for me, and mainejohn no theres not really any specifically different styles of celtic tenor banjo playing...some different players play differently...though theres certainly not regional styles like in fiddle playing.


Edited by - diarmaid on 11/02/2007 16:00:02

mander - Posted - 11/02/2007:  17:38:59


Hate to show my ignorance, but is a box the same as an accordian? Or is it something altogether different?

Thanks,

mainejohn - Posted - 11/02/2007:  19:00:03


quote:
Originally posted by diarmaid

fiddle or button accordian are the best complementing instruments for me, and mainejohn no theres not really any specifically different styles of celtic tenor banjo playing...some different players play differently...though theres certainly not regional styles like in fiddle playing.





I didn't think so, but it sounds as if Daniel T knows more about this than I do. He probably does, so I'll just muddle along, enjoying the medicinal blend of Celtic tenor banjo, bodhrans, and Guiness! Damn!...I need to go to Ireland!

Cheers,
John
Scarborough, Maine

pweller - Posted - 11/03/2007:  00:59:00


Yeah, box and accordion are the same. Sometimes the Irish use a melodeon, which is just an accordion with one row of buttons, although you can really use any accordion for the music.

DanielT - Posted - 11/03/2007:  13:32:41


quote:
Originally posted by mainejohn
I didn't think so, but it sounds as if Daniel T knows more about this than I do. He probably does, so I'll just muddle along, enjoying the medicinal blend of Celtic tenor banjo, bodhrans, and Guiness! Damn!...I need to go to Ireland!


Well, I won't claim that I know more, but wouldn't you bristle if you read a response to a question about complementing instruments in bluegrass that went like this:

"I'm no expert, but IMHO, if it doesn't feature a washboard, it ain't Anglo. Nothin' like Anglo five string banjo, a washboard and a jug of moonshine!"

It's cool that people are into defining a pan-Celtic style of music, but am I the only one who's troubled by the tendency to elide "Celtic" and "Irish?"

mainejohn - Posted - 11/03/2007:  13:55:58


quote:
Originally posted by DanielT

quote:
Originally posted by mainejohn
I didn't think so, but it sounds as if Daniel T knows more about this than I do. He probably does, so I'll just muddle along, enjoying the medicinal blend of Celtic tenor banjo, bodhrans, and Guiness! Damn!...I need to go to Ireland!


Well, I won't claim that I know more, but wouldn't you bristle if you read a response to a question about complementing instruments in bluegrass that went like this:

"I'm no expert, but IMHO, if it doesn't feature a washboard, it ain't Anglo. Nothin' like Anglo five string banjo, a washboard and a jug of moonshine!"

It's cool that people are into defining a pan-Celtic style of music, but am I the only one who's troubled by the tendency to elide "Celtic" and "Irish?"





Daniel: To me, "Celtic music" and "Irish music" are one and the same. I don't know any better. I'm really not a fan of BG and moonshine. What I do enjoy is the music I hear when I visit the Canadian maritimes, which up there is referred to as "Celtic maritime music", or at least it is in the places I visit and by the people I hang out with. I'm sorry if I made you bristle. No hard feelings!

Cheers,
John
Scarborough, Maine

DanielT - Posted - 11/03/2007:  14:10:13


quote:
Originally posted by mainejohn
I'm sorry if I made you bristle. No hard feelings!



No hard feelings at all! I just get all curmudgeonly sometimes.

mainejohn - Posted - 11/03/2007:  14:58:49


I thought I was the "King of Curmudgeon"...just ask my kids!

Cheers,
John
Scarborough, Maine

Klondike Waldo - Posted - 11/04/2007:  11:54:40


quote:
Originally posted by mainejohn
[snip
Daniel: To me, "Celtic music" and "Irish music" are one and the same. I don't know any better. I'm really not a fan of BG and moonshine. What I do enjoy is the music I hear when I visit the Canadian maritimes, which up there is referred to as "Celtic maritime music", or at least it is in the places I visit and by the people I hang out with. I'm sorry if I made you bristle. No hard feelings!

Cheers,
John
Scarborough, Maine



Well, a lot of the Celtic music you'll be hearing in the Maritimes comes out of a Scottish tradition rather than an Irish tradition, but there has always been a lot of cross fertilization between Irish and Scottish music and culture.

deligo ergo renideo,
Bob Cam

Jon Eric - Posted - 11/05/2007:  10:58:20


Fiddle would have to be the best complimenting instrument for this style music


Jon Eric

http://www.myspace

mikeyes - Posted - 11/05/2007:  14:04:45


Seamus "East Coast" Egan talks about the banjo getting its sound from the accordion and the pipes. (This on the Masters of the Banjo CD) and he likes to play with those instruments. Fiddle is OK, but just listen to Angelina Carberry and tell me that it is better than the banjo/accordion mix.

Mike Keyes
http://www.banjose

pweller - Posted - 11/05/2007:  17:27:02


The fiddle/banjo mix is OK, but when an accordion gets thrown in as well, the two meld and each loses its distinctive sound. One instrument at a time sounds best with banjo. It's all a matter of taste. And yes, Angeline Carberry's banjo/accordion mix is top notch!

JFDonovan - Posted - 11/10/2007:  01:48:32


If my memory serves me correctly, Johnny Keenan thought any instrument sounded great with his Tenor Banjo, as long as they stayed in the background , kept in time and complimented his amazing licks, reels, jigs and hornpipes. When it was time for someone else to take a break it was Johnny's time to sip from his pint of Guiness. So good timing, chord changes, transposing and maintaining the melody no matter what the instrument is will compliment an Irish Tenor Banjo. IMO

John D

Earle O`Cameron - Posted - 11/13/2007:  01:49:07


To whoever mentioned flute being bad...come to think of it, I recall getting into a little disagreement with the flute player in my band as to the speed of "Star of the County Down" last week because I wanted it slower to accentuate more ornamentation, but she wanted it in double time (like the group used to do before I played it on banjo) to make it work better on flute. So maybe there is something to that.

pweller - Posted - 11/13/2007:  12:14:54


Yeah, flutists sometimes forget fingers move faster over sound holes than strings (I've played tin whistle and I can account for it being faster). However, Star of the County Down is a fun song to play in double-time on the banjo. Orthodox Celts have a video of it on YouTube done rather quickly, and it sounds fun.

Earle O`Cameron - Posted - 11/13/2007:  15:21:20


Hey thanks for the Orthodox Celts video, I think it was a big help in figuring out what to play for me. We'll see after I find where I put my pick.

Feo - Posted - 11/14/2007:  12:23:55


The banjo blends well with alot of other instruments in Irish music .... a fiddle often gets drowned out by other instruments but the tenor banjo has a bark to it that can always be heard in the mix .... if I play Irish tunes on a 5-string banjo the bodhran completely screws me up .... I used to play dances with my tenor banjo and a professional piper , worked out great ...
I have never figured out the fascination with accordians in Irish music, haven't heard one yet that I like ... For my metal free-reed instruments , give me the concertina and harmonica ...concertina has an interesting bark to it's timbre...and I think harmonica is much more interesting then accordian... I like slower flute playing ...when they do the speed-playing all I can hear is that
pphffft phffft pphfft , gasp gasp , stuff going on ... plus every flute player looks like they are in some kind of pain , the way they have to twist their necks and all to play their instrument :-) Whistle players look alot more comfortable..

locustsympathizer - Posted - 11/14/2007:  13:31:00


Random -- John Carty plays tenor alongside a saxophone in his band At The Racket...it's actually really sweet. When I first heard it, it sounded like mellow uilleann pipes in a ceilidh band.

Agreed, accordions and their ilk are a great match for the banjo! Fiddles, too -- whistles and flutes don't have the broad sound of a fiddle or a box, so in a duet, the banjo and the flute sound like they're competing more than complementing.

---
rain like gravel on an ol

snapjackson - Posted - 10/13/2008:  17:23:32


Harmonica and washboard.

www.myspace.com/thesecondstringquintet

Tom Hanway - Posted - 10/16/2008:  03:17:37


This is a brilliant question, but not easy to answer. In Ireland, it's all about performing context, even for Irish banjo, so by "Celtic setting", do you mean "best complementing instrument" at a pub session, ceílí, concert, or in the recording studio? Is the banjoist playing for an attentive audience, or competing with pub noise, performing for ceílí dancers, or playing in a studio environment? These details really matter and it's important to distinguish between different audiences and contexts. I play trad on the 5-string and guitar "back in the auld sod", recently joining an Irish traditional/contemporary festival band - Rig the Jig. Context is everything. I speak as a committed professional who plays for the public.

Let's start with dances, since professional banjo players in Ireland find a lot of work playing ceílís. I asked Michael Banahan, founder of Rig the Jig. Michael says, "The piano is fantastic at keeping the timing right for ceílí bands". He observes that a steady piano is needed by dancers, "without it the whole thing could fall apart".

Great backing piano players know the tunes and don't mess around or do harmonic guesswork. They don't play in DADGAD (guitar tuning). So an Irish banjo player in a ceílí band can depend on a piano - and the guitar wouldn't be considered the best complementing instrument in this context. It's "steady" and arranged piano that the whole thing is literally "swinging" on. That's just one context.

My bias - because I do this a lot - is that I know guitar is extremely versatile in backing tunes, and it complements all the instruments - not just banjo. At sessions I back players on guitar these days, when I'm not playing my own tunes on the banjo. I have done a lot of recording sessions for many producers, for different artists in multiple genres. I hear a lot of traditional music and make a lot of sessions locally and get around - see my BH photos for some hot spots.

Here is another context. Paul Gurney, a gifted keyboardist and multi-instrumentalist, is a top studio musician and engineer who records and also plays keyboards on Irish trad recordings for serious artists such as Arty McGlynn, John Carty, Solas, Frankie Gavin - Fierce Traditional - Frankie's reply to his critics, go here: http://www.taramusic.com/sleevenotes/cd4011.htm - as well as Rig the Jig. Paul plays in Rig the Jig. (The website needs an overhaul, but google the band and check out the old line-up and recordings. It's all good.)

I am the main backing guitarist on the current Rig the Jig recording sessions, but the banjo player for gigs ... all will be revealed. Gurney calls me up, I go over to his studio and he plays me his piano ideas and leaves them with me. I come up with the acoustic guitar parts, and I run suggestions past him, and we figure out modi operandi. We usually have a B and a C plan and improvise as we go.

I work closely with Gurney, who records all kinds of tune "backers" (not just for banjo), so I will ask his opinion, though I kind of know already. He's seen, played in and/or recorded all the standard situations. He has done projects with a plethora of traditional players here in Ireland, including tenor banjoists, Gerry O'Connor, Enda Scahill, John Carty (on fiddle), Cathal Hayden (on fiddle) and Seamus Egan (Solas). Gurney's been using my 5-string on different projects, with more tracks to do for Rig the Jig. This is a breakthrough for me, because I'm moving beyond bluegrass and country recordings here in Ireland. (I only live five minutes away from him, so we do tracking, usually at a moment's notice. It's been a fun time for me, and I love it - dream of a lifetime!)

I usually record to Paul's reference piano, whether or not we use it later in the mix. It could take a few passes, and I rehearse it and try to get it in the first take (or two). After that, you really do begin to lose something - Roy Acuff said that. He's right.

This is recording and getting it right for posterity - not "bludgeon-strumming" or blasting away madly at a session. Especially at sessions, it's not about showing off or playing louder (more obnoxiously) than the next guy banging away. It's about listening and playing with sensitivity.

In my experience, I would say there is no definitive backing or "complementing" instrument for Irish banjo (or any other trad instrument) - the latter is not a term that players use in Ireland. It is a good one nevertheless.


Happy pickin,

Tom

http://www.tomhanway.com/discog.htm
http://www.tomhanway.com


Edited by - Tom Hanway on 10/16/2008 04:13:54

Tom Hanway - Posted - 10/16/2008:  04:18:36


quote:
Originally posted by snapjackson

Harmonica and washboard.

www.myspace.com/thesecondstringquintet

This is not so far-fetched and there is an Irish-Cajun-bluegrass-gospel band doing this, based out of Dublin - Prison Love. They are immensely popular, even playing Glastonbury this year. They even have a horseshoe player, instead of a triangle!

Now, my personal choices, after my last essay, for laughs: if it's just two musicians, I'll take a daring contrapuntal guitarist, bouzouki or cittern player any day. I like string players. I like 5-string banjo and concertina for jigs, slides and polkas. I love melodeon and love playing with Johnny O'Halloran at Tigh Coili's in Galway town on Sundays.

I like harmonica and washboard too; a good egg shaker is fun, hey, tabla works. I'm not keen on distorted electric guitar, but loud guitar does not bother me - I'm no purist either - it depends. A good piano accordionist is a good find.

It all depends on the tune, the context, the local players and local tradition, and, well, who's doing it. I like guitarists and piano players who hear root movement in the bass and know how to re-harmonise a melody on successive passes, but that's just me.

I also love open-style uilleann pipes for 5-string, such as Noel Carberry who is the piper in Rig the Jig. Noel, an inveterate player, is the son of Peter Carberry. Both men are shining lights in an eminent list of Longford pipers, some of the best ... ever.

About Rig the Jig, which I recently joined: it's not a ceílí band, but a contemporary trad-crossover outfit. Bodhrán and guitar keep things tight; the outfit doesn't rely on piano or any single instrument to keep it steady. This band tours internationally, has a label deal and digital distribution. A complete re-working of the website and band material is currently in the works. It is groundbreaking stuff for all of us, especially for me, who has to work harder at this because, well....

The band used to have two tenor banjoists before hiring a 5-string player. I'm doing a lot of practicing and woodshedding on new tunes all the time. We have an 18-year old female fiddling prodigy (secret) who is also a gorgeous singer and keeps the energy flying (and keeps me on my toes). All will be revealed in 2009, after the recording comes out.

Irish traditional music, at its core, boils down to melody, unaccompanied, i.e., sean-nós (old style). The solo performer or instrumentalist is still at the centre, still much admired at sessions and concerts.

A good tune backer supports the melody and helps get the music across; likewise, a sloppy or insensitive tune backer can interfere with the melody player(s). In Irish traditional music, proper, tunes should never be lost to the "changes" or (poly)rhythms. When this happens it's some kind of Celtic fusion - almost jazz.

Mikeyes, as per usual, is spot on about tenor banjoist Angelina Carberry, cousin to Noel and great-niece to Peter Carberry. She doesn't need any complementing backing from anybody. An overeager or inexperienced backer (on any instrument) could easily detract from her precision and style. Husband Martin Quinn plays the tunes just fine on the "box", i.e., button accordion. Go here for the real deal - the box and the banjo complement one another - no need for a backer:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vx5aC6zZH8Y


Happy pickin,

Tom

http://www.tomhanway.com/discog.htm
http://www.tomhanway.com


Edited by - Tom Hanway on 10/16/2008 20:50:55

diarmaid - Posted - 10/20/2008:  00:55:23


heres a few great tenor banjo other instrument combinations with great complimentary playing.

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=-_0-QCuusi8 Cathal Hayden, Arty McGlynn and P.J McDonald

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=q1H8I3I59B8 Cathal Hayden, Seamie O' Dowd and Martin O' Connor

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=MDMnM36CLu4 Damien O' Kane and Shona Kipling

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=O-XKQ...ture=related Gerry O' Connor, Sharon Shannon and others

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=DRUUh...ture=related Éamonn Coyne and Kris Drever

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=YXj5v...ture=related Éamonn Coyne, Kris Drever and John Joe Kelly

Tom Hanway - Posted - 10/20/2008:  23:59:59


quote:
Originally posted by diarmaid

heres a few great tenor banjo other instrument combinations with great complimentary playing.

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=-_0-QCuusi8 Cathal Hayden, Arty McGlynn and P.J McDonald

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=q1H8I3I59B8 Cathal Hayden, Seamie O' Dowd and Martin O' Connor

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=MDMnM36CLu4 Damien O' Kane and Shona Kipling

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=O-XKQ...ture=related Gerry O' Connor, Sharon Shannon and others

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=DRUUh...ture=related Éamonn Coyne and Kris Drever

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=YXj5v...ture=related Éamonn Coyne, Kris Drever and John Joe Kelly

Diarmaid - all nice players here, a list with no explanation. It's a lovely "compliment" to these players, but such a list is not instructive in answering the question posed here, which asks for the best complementing instrument. You have inserted complimentary playing, which means by definition that the playing is given freely as a courtesy or expressing a compliment. You don't mean to imply that, do you? These are top professionals here, and they play for money, even if YouTube pays no royalties. Do you mean they're playing complimentarily for YouTube? Probably not.

How does your list - by no means comprehensive - answer the actual question posed in the topic? I see video URLs, but no explanation about any particular complementing instrument.

What are your personal preferences based on playing experience (session, band or studio)? I would imagine that you have a more relevant answer beyond *dropping* videos that *dump* a list of players.


Happy pickin,

Tom

http://www.tomhanway.com/discog.htm
http://www.tomhanway.com

diarmaid - Posted - 10/21/2008:  00:11:18


less is more!...hard man to please Tom!

i meant that theres several different combinations that can work brilliantly to compliment the banjo...as i stated months ago the button accordian is one of my favourites though in each video there is something quite a bit different in the first PJ McDonald shows that a tin whistle can sound great as a complimentary instrument...fast phrasing which is similar to how a banjo player plays, and Arty McGlynn doing a sensitive job as always on the guitar.in vid 2 theres Seamie O'Dowd playing practically the whole tunes and harmonies very well on the guitar before Martin O'Connor joins in on the box. in 3 Shona Kipling plays mainly drones and harmonies on the piano accordian...showing another harmonious style, and form of complimentary playing...in 4 Sharon Shannon starts off with the box playing a nice version of the Swedish jig and its Gerry O'Connor who joins later to offer complimentary playing on the banjo (theres a host of other instruments but for me its the box and banjo that are driving the music in this piece). in vid 5 Eamonn Coyne and Kris Drever are both playing the melody excellently with Kris playing some harmony parts and carrying the tune on at one point...video 6 was added primarily in reference to the several mentions of bodhrans in earlier posts...this is probably the best bodhran player alive and this is to show how it can be played in a great toned down, tasteful and complimentary way (John Joe Kelly is also a great banjo and mandolin player) and Kris Drever is doing a great job of sensitively accompanying on guitar again. i hope that explains the videos sufficiently for anyone unhappy with my previous post

heres another video for the list with the fantastic Leon Hunt playing an Irish tune in a bluegass/irish arrangement where solos are done on banjo and low whistle (Mike McGoldrick) while the guitar and bodhran do sensitive backing without a solo
http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=ehSTssRUTRk

www.banjomafia.com check it out!

Tom Hanway - Posted - 10/21/2008:  00:54:14


Less is less and in my experience I've come to realise that "thank you" doesn't pay the bills! Know what I mean?

Now, that's a mo' betta explanation (your last one), but you are still using the word "complimentary", which is an incorrect word choice, and not what the topic asks. Look them up folks if you don't believe me. Complimentary and complementing have two very different meanings and sets of connotations. Let's be precise here.

I am somewhat satisfied Diarmaid - and I was not unhappy if you meant to imply that - that you took a bit of time to answer a question - that you don't care *less* or are leaving players out deliberately. I could add to your list, but "less is more", for starters.

What would you recommend as the "best complementing instrument for Irish banjo", or set of instruments, based on your personal expertise or professional experience? Sorry for any confusion in post order, I was editing this while you replied. Great answer and I'm inclined the same way.



Happy pickin,

Tom

http://www.tomhanway.com/discog.htm
http://www.tomhanway.com


Edited by - Tom Hanway on 10/21/2008 01:09:57

diarmaid - Posted - 10/21/2008:  01:00:46


my favourite accompanying instrument for banjo in general would probably be a button accordian...though for me its more about the tastefulness of the accompanying musician(s) more than the instrument.

Tom Hanway - Posted - 10/21/2008:  02:18:37


quote:
Originally posted by diarmaid

my favourite accompanying instrument for banjo in general would probably be a button accordian...though for me its more about the tastefulness of the accompanying musician(s) more than the instrument.

Diamaid - now I understand what you were hinting at before. I like the box too, and I like eclectic, backing string players who play contrapuntally, like Dónal Lunny (on my Hangout Photos page). I like strings and fiddles at sessions and in the recording studio. The box and the melodeon also sound great with Irish banjo (tenor and 5-string).

Have you made (or approved of) a YouTube video of yourself playing with a favourite accompaniment instrument, in either a home or professional situation?

I have an ethical question for you, and I'm wondering if it concerns you as an artist or professional. I'll be brief:

What would you think, in general, of someone else putting out a YouTube video of you playing banjo (with or without accompaniment) without your knowledge or permission? Just curious ... because you express yourself quite often by posting other people's videos, which are not necessarily made or approved by the artists themselves. Some artists, indeed, want artistic control, but many YouTube videos pre-empt that, and then there is the question of royalties. "Thank you" doesn't pay the bills in general. Is "less" really "more" for the artists involved, whose choice may be taken away from them?


Happy pickin,

Tom

http://www.tomhanway.com/discog.htm
http://www.tomhanway.com


Edited by - Tom Hanway on 10/25/2008 08:32:43

diarmaid - Posted - 10/21/2008:  02:32:43


Tom the "less is more" i was talking about was describing my points in as few words as possible.

i find links to the music im discussing, as it helps people understand what im talking about specifically. I wish i was at a high enough skill level that people would want to video me (or watch me) playing the banjo for youtube, and if i had played a tune well, i would have no problems with letting someone put it on youtube...im not committed to any major record label now and its unlikely i ever will be!.. and i play irish music...so royalties and copyright aren't really an issue for me...i'd be happy for any music i played to get to as wide an audience as possible

Tom Hanway - Posted - 10/21/2008:  02:47:21


quote:
Originally posted by diarmaid

Tom the "less is more" i was talking about was describing my points in as few words as possible.

i find links to the music im discussing, as it helps people understand what im talking about specifically. I wish i was at a high enough skill level that people would want to video me (or watch me) playing the banjo for youtube, and if i had played a tune well, i would have no problems with letting someone put it on youtube...im not committed to any major record label now and its unlikely i ever will be!.. and i play irish music...so royalties and copyright aren't really an issue for me...i'd be happy for any music i played to get to as wide an audience as possible

So, okay, you are speaking as a non-professional who plays Irish music - I get it. That's one context. I get you now. Less is more. I agree with you that it is a good idea to reach as wide an audience as possible. Some people try to help others do this, without their permission, and "do-gooders" - I'm not pointing the finger at you - are not always helpful or appreciated by the artists whose original works and recordings may be at stake (for copyright control, mechanicals, royalities, residuals and the like).

I enjoyed the videos. Good stuff ... cheap.

Happy pickin,

Tom

http://www.tomhanway.com/discog.htm
http://www.tomhanway.com

Page: 1  2  

Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.0625