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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Last Chance - Clawhammer (restrung guitar experiment)


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/393323

Noodlin - Posted - 10/12/2023:  07:50:54


After hearing Tom Collins play his Rickard Resophonic Banjo a few times over on Banjo Quest, I decided I wanted to experiment with that electrified sound myself. I haven't played my electric guitar in quite some time now, so I pulled it out of the closet, dusted it off, and restrung it in a similar fashion to a banjo by replacing the 6th string with a 1st string.

While it doesn't sound like a banjo, it's quite fun to play "as" a banjo, and gives those old banjo tunes an interesting new spin that I find enjoyable to explore. It won't replace a banjo of course, but I'd call the experiment a success, and I think it'll be fun to play around with.


Stu D Baker-Hawk - Posted - 10/12/2023:  09:23:51


That is wonderful!  I have a Recording King parlor resophonic guitar that's strung in the same fashion as your electric guitar (i.e., the sixth string now sports a .009 gauge string).  Though I'm fighting arthritis which makes it difficult to play, I've been getting a lot of enjoyment out of this little experiment.  So, thanks much for sharing this with us.  Maybe this idea will take off with more folks experimenting with their guitars such as you and I did.  Good picking! 

davidppp - Posted - 10/12/2023:  09:31:42


I like electric guitar sound, too.   And that's what you get no matter how you string it or play it.



Bill Rickard's Resophonic doesn't sound like a banjo either.  Banjo sound requires a drum head, and much of it comes through even if you're using a magnetic pick-up on the strings.  A resonator cone (à la Rickard) doesn't by itself sound like a resonator guitar.  In fact, its sound is a bit weak compared to banjos or resonator guitars. That's why his only comes with a pick-up system.  It's pricey.  I went DIY, which can be quite cheap, depending on how you source the parts.  Here are two sound samples: its.caltech.edu/~politzer/reso...ght-2.mp3 , its.caltech.edu/~politzer/reso...ght-1.mp3 , which are included in a brief description of the construction (its.caltech.edu/~politzer/reso...nator.pdf).  (Note that the bridge has to sit in the middle of the cone, which requires some carpentry on the neck to maintain the scale length as determined by the fret spacing.)  Of course, some sort of pick-up could be added.



This construction was just the first stage of an ambitious project to address resonator guitars.  The subsequent steps appear as they come on its.caltech.edu/~politzer/ .




Paul Roberts - Posted - 10/12/2023:  12:22:51


Nice dreamy sustain...

I, too, enjoy banjo-izing other instrument.



TreyDBanjoKS - Posted - 10/12/2023:  14:03:31


I keep a telecaster strung that way- I put a spike on the 5th fret of the low E to easily switch between 6 string and 5+1 configurations. I don't notice the spike under my fingers when I play 6 string.

This guitar also has a scruggs tuner on the b-string for more banjo-y goodness. When combined with behind the nut string bends there are a lot of cool sounds available!

-TD

Noodlin - Posted - 10/12/2023:  16:26:31


Thank you guys!

Paul, that was beautiful! Just lovely.

Trey, I’m thinking about putting a spike in on this one for that convertibility too, glad to hear you’ve done it and it works fine.

I really wasn’t trying for a banjo sound, but rather simply to explore how banjo tunings and picking techniques translate to guitar, and I am quite impressed. I do love the dreamy sustain, and the patterns involved just give the guitar an interesting and unusual character that surprises people. It’s a lot of fun!

Paul Roberts - Posted - 10/12/2023:  18:11:12


Adam's demonstration shows that the 5-string banjo, its playing and setup, can be utilized as an *orientation* that can be creatively utilized on other types of instruments; a cross-feeding which might bring about some interesting music...like frailing on a tubasmiley

Noodlin - Posted - 10/13/2023:  08:05:56


quote:

Originally posted by davidppp

I like electric guitar sound, too.   And that's what you get no matter how you string it or play it.



Bill Rickard's Resophonic doesn't sound like a banjo either.  Banjo sound requires a drum head, and much of it comes through even if you're using a magnetic pick-up on the strings.  A resonator cone (à la Rickard) doesn't by itself sound like a resonator guitar.  In fact, its sound is a bit weak compared to banjos or resonator guitars. That's why his only comes with a pick-up system.  It's pricey.  I went DIY, which can be quite cheap, depending on how you source the parts.  Here are two sound samples: its.caltech.edu/~politzer/reso...ght-2.mp3 , its.caltech.edu/~politzer/reso...ght-1.mp3 , which are included in a brief description of the construction (its.caltech.edu/~politzer/reso...nator.pdf).  (Note that the bridge has to sit in the middle of the cone, which requires some carpentry on the neck to maintain the scale length as determined by the fret spacing.)  Of course, some sort of pick-up could be added.



This construction was just the first stage of an ambitious project to address resonator guitars.  The subsequent steps appear as they come on its.caltech.edu/~politzer/ .






Some very interesting reading in there David!  Thanks for sharing it, I can tell you've put a lot of into researching the subject!



Cheers,



Adam

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