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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: How do you string a Waverly 5th string tuner?


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/386516

mamero - Posted - 10/27/2022:  18:29:44


How do you correctly string a Waverly Planetary 5th String Peg? Could someone kindly point me to a stringing guide? Thanks.

OldNavyGuy - Posted - 10/27/2022:  18:57:33


See this archived thread...

banjohangout.org/archive/275954

Tim Mullins - Posted - 10/27/2022:  19:02:12


With the banjo on its back I lay a string package under the tuner so it is easier to see to vertically center the hole in the tuner shaft. I attach the string at the tailpiece and lay it over the bridge and the fifth string pip. Thread the string in from the top and pull the slack out, then tighten the tuner just enough to catch and hold the string. I then flip the banjo over and nip the string as close as possible to the tuner shaft, then continue tuning up to pitch. This draws the loose end of the string up around the shaft to where it won't poke your thumb while playing. Works for me!

The Old Timer - Posted - 10/28/2022:  12:59:56


I'm even more interested in how you remove the stub of a broken string from the dang Waverly I received on one banjo I bought. What a pain!!

gbisignani - Posted - 10/28/2022:  13:11:03


I agree with OldTimer. The issue I had with one was getting the string off when it is broken. I had actually requested the Waverly on a banjo I had made maybe 4 years ago. Even a local luthier had problems getting the string off the tuner. Even though I don't like the look of the tuners that have that barrel on them, I had the Waverly taken off and replaced with a Gotoh.

BNJOMAKR - Posted - 10/28/2022:  13:57:07


quote:

Originally posted by gbisignani

I agree with OldTimer. The issue I had with one was getting the string off when it is broken. I had actually requested the Waverly on a banjo I had made maybe 4 years ago. Even a local luthier had problems getting the string off the tuner. Even though I don't like the look of the tuners that have that barrel on them, I had the Waverly taken off and replaced with a Gotoh.






It's a pain in the axx to remove the broken piece from around the shaft. I keep ice pick type tool that has a 90 degree bend near the tip in my case, and a pair of bent end needle nose pliers to aid in removal of it.



I'll never forget the night that we were playing in a dark coffee house and my 5th string broke on the Waverly tuner in the middle of a song (my banjo below). It was dark!... did I say it was DARK!? The band kept playing as I struggled to remove the broken piece. No one came to my aid to hold a small flashlight. The group finished that song, and the next one. At the end of it, the leader told the crowd, "He knows how to build a banjo, but he can't change the strings on one!"  I was NOT a happy banjo picker the rest of the night.


Edited by - BNJOMAKR on 10/28/2022 13:58:03


arnie fleischer - Posted - 10/28/2022:  14:06:40


I love the Waverly fifth string tuner. It's on three of my banjos. Check out my post in the archived thread linked by Old Navy Guy above for detailed instructions.



As for removing a broken string, grab the visible portion of the string with needle nosed pliers. Hold the string fast and pull on it gently, back and forth, while at the same time slowly turning the tuner knob a quarter-turn to the right and a quarter-turn back to the left, never losing sight of the hole in the center of the shaft through which the string goes if properly installed. Do this repeatedly. The broken string will gradually loosen and you'll be able to remove it with the pliers.


Edited by - arnie fleischer on 10/28/2022 14:08:49

mamero - Posted - 10/28/2022:  14:20:03


Thanks for the direction folks. My new Gold Tone Bela Fleck Signature arrived this week! Very exciting! It comes with a Waverly tuner. In the process of loosening the strings to raise the bride for the first time the 5th string broke. Yes, that's right, the 5th string broke while tuning it down! That's a first for me. In case you ask if I was sure I was actually tuning down, YES, 200%. I know it broke while tuning down because I was gently plucking and listening while I did so. This is my first banjo with the Waverly tuner. Hopefully It will not be too troublesome.

mamero - Posted - 10/28/2022:  14:30:23


quote:

Originally posted by arnie fleischer

I love the Waverly fifth string tuner. It's on three of my banjos...






This is an awesome start to your reply. It implies you own at least four banjos! yes

lightgauge - Posted - 10/28/2022:  16:57:41


I had one back when it was a 5 star. I removed it for most of the reasons mentioned, plus multiple stab wounds dealing with it. I don't carry needle nose pliers when I am picking.

Tim Mullins - Posted - 10/28/2022:  19:19:27


I think the secret is to have no slack in the string and to clip the string as short as possible before final tuning up. This draws the end back in around the shaft where it can't poke you and avoids having unnecessary extra wraps around the shaft which make a broken end more difficult to deal with. I have been using Waverly fifth string tuners for over fifteen years and just haven't had the difficulties with them that some others have mentioned. I've actually been poked more often with string ends on right-angle geared tuners. smiley

mamero - Posted - 10/28/2022:  20:27:31


I would love to see a YouTube of video on how to actually string one of these.

Bill H - Posted - 10/29/2022:  04:23:38


I have had one of these on my Tubaphone conversion banjo for about forty years and have never encountered the issues being discussed. Like any tuner, the string goes into the hole, and you turn the knob to wind it to pitch. A broken string can be troublesome to remove, but I keep a pair of tweezers in my toolbox, and they usually do the trick. Broken strings are not a frequent problem , fortunately.

mamero - Posted - 10/29/2022:  14:26:51


How much slack do you wind in to these?

arnie fleischer - Posted - 10/29/2022:  18:49:14


Stew-Mac's instructions say that once you've threaded the string through the hole in the center of the shaft, clip the string so that an inch to an inch and a half remains extended beyond the tuner. But what the instructions don't say is probably the most important thing to do: push that inch or so of string back toward the peg before you start turning the peg. That does two things: it creates some slack, and the small portion of string that now extends beyond the hole (maybe an eighth of an inch) forms a hook as you tighten the string.



You should take a look at the archived thread Old Navy Guy linked to, my post in particular because it's a clear and detailed explanation, if I do say so myself.cheeky

 

LouZee Picker - Posted - 10/30/2022:  20:26:09


Arnie's instructions are spot on for attaching a new string ! The old 5 Star Planet & Waverly geared 5th string tuners are the best ones on the market if you know how to properly string it up & change it out for a new string.
If You do it properly, you will never break a short piece of string off in the spool hub or have to much extra string wound around the spool which causes breakage. Always keep pressure on the string when your winding out the string for removal, it will slide right out of the spool hub.
If buy chance you don't keep pressure on the string while removing it, the string starts reverse winding in the hub when it gets to the end of the string and often times breaks. The best way to remove the tightly bound string from the hub is dig it out with a dental tool instrument that your dental hygienist uses to clean your teeth. When you get enough of the string dug out from the spool you can pull the rest of the string out with needle nose pliers.
The most important thing to check on first is that the Tuner is installed in the neck at the right position, if improperly installed you will continually break your strings. The tuner has 2 vertical supports in the hub on each side of the spool, make sure that the string is not riding on either one of the supports after you install the tuner ! Your new string should only be contacting the spool in the hub and not the hub supports.

Hope this helps,
Brian

mamero - Posted - 10/31/2022:  11:04:08


quote:

Originally posted by LouZee Picker

If buy chance you don't keep pressure on the string while removing it, the string starts reverse winding in the hub when it gets to the end of the string and often times breaks.






This explains why the string broke while loosening it to raise the bridge on my new banjo. Great explanation. Thanks!

mamero - Posted - 10/31/2022:  11:26:27


Thanks for the help everyone! I had some old used strings kicking around which I practiced on. I broke a couple practice strings but eventually got it with your guidance. I concur, the correct approach is:

1. Make sure the Waverly tuner is positioned so you can see through the hole front to back.
2. String at the tail as normal
3. Feed the string through the hole from the front out the back
4. Pull the string from the back (taut but not tight) so there is no slack (for now). Make sure the tailpiece is still OK and the string is in the correct bridge slot.
5. From the back of the tuner (the backside of the neck) measure a couple of inches. Keep +- two inches and snip off the rest.
6. Pull the string end back so that the end extends just a few mm out the back tuner hole, there will now be about 2 inches of slack in your string. (pull, don't push with your finger other wise blood is involved!)
7. Start winding. This string should "catch" pretty quickly (about half a turn). It makes a sharp Z shape hook in the process which is what "locks" the string.
8. Tune up to pitch. Done.

What makes stringing a Waverly 5th string tuner a nail biter is you must trim the string BEFORE you tune it up which takes commitment! If it slips during winding the Z hook is made but because your string is already cut you are unlikely to be able to use the string again. This is why I left 2 inches. It's short but, enough still remains so that if the string slips during winding you can snip the Z hook off and have enough length to do one more attempt (which is what happened to me).

mamero - Posted - 10/31/2022:  11:28:28


Often it's the "simple" things where you learn the most.

arnie fleischer - Posted - 10/31/2022:  11:51:16


One more detail:

Stew-Mac's instructions state that the hole through which the string goes is larger on one side, and that once the old string is removed you should make sure the larger side is facing up at you. In other words, insert the new string through the larger side of the hole. The difference in the size of the hole is real but you have to look closely, and it helps a lot if you place a white cloth or a sheet of paper beneath the tuner.

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